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19

Yes, install heating cable behind the mirror - it will heat the mirror and water will not condense on the mirror. Heating cable manufacturers even offer some special kits for that - like this one from DEVI.


12

I'm unaware of any permanent solutions, but there are quick fixes available in the auto and dental industry. Dentists use anti-fogging solution like this or this. I know a guy who uses Rain-X Interior Glass Anti-Fog on his car mirrors. Would probably work inside a shower, too.


11

At Home Depot (or Lowes) you should be able to find these Spring Loaded Mirror Mounting Clips made specially for hanging a mirror. They are no where near as big as a j channel and the top two have a small spring inside of them so they kind of grasp the mirror (and snugly fit on the glass). You put the two without the springs in the bottom and the mirror ...


10

Why, of course! You're looking for a "magnetic catch". Just you should possibly install it the other way around - a metal plate on the wall, and the catch screwed on the mirror. Images added: Magnet mounted as plug in the cabinet with large head screw contact Magnet in cup washer and mating contact washer mounted with screws Thin magnet to metal plate ...


7

For the truly DIY solution, you can clean the mirror with soapy water. The layer of soap helps reduce the fog. It also tends to be the nearest cleaner when you're in the shower.


7

I'd agree with DA01 here. It's far more likely that your wall isn't perfectly flat rather than the mirror being distorted. The simple way to test this is to get a spirit level - or anything with an edge you know is true - and lay it across the mirror. If it doesn't lie flush then the mirror is warped. You can do the same with the wall.


6

Liquid Nails Mirror Adhesive, but it does say you need to use a mechanical support as well, such as a shelf angle or "J" channel. Another option is Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive which will hold about anything. In our new house, we installed large, frameless mirrors in each bathroom using this and it worked great. UPDATE As Alex pointed out in the ...


6

What you're looking for is called a "stand-off". From mirrorsupports.net: For simple, standoffs, without the need to drill holes in the mirror, choose from the following framepegs or edgegrips. For large heavy mirrors and large offsets - drill holes in the mirror and use our standoff sytems.


6

Here is a little known secret, don't tell anyone!!!! "Bar Keepers Friend" powered cleaner works miracles with fogged, rain stained and calcium covered glass. It contains acyclic acid and a mirco fine abrasive. It cleans glass, head light lenses and fiberglass like crazy and give you a very smooth polished finish. you can also use it with a buffing wheel ...


5

Mirrors are made up of two parts, the glass and then a reflective coating on the back. Because of this, they are not considered 100% glass and many times the town's recycle pickup (if your have one) for glass will not take them because there will be an additional process to separate the glass from the reflective material backing. Possible disposal methods: ...


5

I'm sure there are several ways to secure your mirror, However the two basic methods are 1) mechanical side clips and 2) Mirror adhesive. The safe and easiest way is to use mirror clips that screw into the wall around the parameter of the mirror. Small drywall anchors are normally used if you're not lucky enough to have a stud along the horizontal sides. ...


5

A good ventilation fan, to remove the steam is the first step. Then you need a heated mirror, or try to putting a floor heating mat behind the mirror. If the mirror is warmer then the tiles then most condensation will form on the tiles rather then mirror.


5

http://www.speich.it/htmlEN/PG/PG.htm


5

In Central Texas, we have very hard water (high calcium levels). I cope with this by using white vinegar. The 5-7% acid level will react with the calcium to make water-soluable salt which is easily removed. Apply vinegar to a damp, clean cloth, or use a spray bottle to apply vinegar to the affected areas. Let soak for 30-45 seconds, then wipe away with a ...


3

I've learned a little trick to this: Water vapor only condenses on colder surfaces so holding the mirror under the hot shower until it has warmed up will make it no longer fog up.


3

You need to find a better hardware store. FWIW, you can order it online: http://www.amazon.com/s?field-keywords=muratic%20acid


3

I had 30 mirror tiles to remove on a wall up a stairwell. Tried a hammer and it bounced off. Had to give it a real hard blow before I could break a tile and then it shattered into 1000's of bits. Next I tried scoring the tile with a glass cutter then prying behind it with a strong putty-like lnife (blade 4 inches long and about 1 inch wide)until it broke on ...


3

Mirror mounting clips (links to an answer to a similar question)


3

I think in this case the best solution is to use a timber profile - L shape trim. You stick it on the edge with some liquid nails glue and so it covers the wall from one side and goes over a mirror edge on the other the ones in the middle in the picture


3

If it's very long, I'd suspect that it's being physically distorted during the installation process since the glass itself is flexible enough to distort the image without breaking first. To correct it, you need to make sure that the mirror is as straight as possible - use shims. If it's along a wall, the mirror may be following the contours of a slightly ...


2

The decorative "washers" that cover the holes in the mirror are called rosettes


2

If you can feel the scratch with your finger nail then there is a good chance that it is too deep to remove by yourself, but you can certainly try! Removing scratches from glass is similar to removing them from car paint - you use a polishing compound (made for glass) and ideally an orbital polisher to try and remove the scratch (lots of muscle power works ...


2

Is the mirror one piece or is it made of tiles? Is it glued in place or supported by clips, brackets, or a frame? If it is mounted (clips, brackets, or frame) carefully unmount it, have it professionally cut, and then remount it. I strongly advise hiring a professional window or glass man to do this. If it is glued but is made of tiles: Locate a supply ...


2

Hydrochloric acid is the key component in swimming pool acidifying products (pH Minus). These products usually contain a buffer, which may make them less useful for your project. But, you can also by the stuff "straight": Crown Muriatic Acid - 1 Gallon at Lowe's.


2

A lot of times you'll find it in the masonry section of your hardware store. It is used a lot for cleaning brick after it is set.


2

I purchased a mirror that has a water reservoir in the back. You fill it with hot water when you start your shower and it will never fog. I've been using it for a few years and I love it.


2

You'll probably have an easier time using a picture hanger than a screw, and it will leave your wall in better shape when you remove it. Picture hangers transfer the downward force into pressure into the wall because the nail is mounted at an angle. The screw, on the other hand, is being bent because you're acting as a lever, where the stud is the fulcrum, ...


2

You could mount support bars on the walls that touch the ends of the shelves. The bars should be screwed into studs that form the framing of the inset walls. Square tubing, either aluminum or steel would do well. The shelves would need to be fairly thick. They would have a slot (dado) cut into in the middle of the end edges, slightly wider that the ...


2

By far, the best approach is to attach either clips or a frame to studs (either wood or steel, depending on your construction). If the panels are being arranged at the same level, you could run rails horizontally along the wall at the base and top of the panels. These could be made from two pieces of molding, one slightly thicker than the thickest glass ...



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