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One option is using Arduino based microcontroller. I recommend JeeNode for integrated wireless. For basic one "server" plus one remote sensor you need two JeeNodes, USB adapter, temperature sensor and battery, all for around 55 €. You need to know how to solder electronic components and program in C. Each additional sensor would cost about 20 €. Here is ...


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Google Power Meter is one good place to start: AlertMe makes a product for the UK market specifically. It's also possible to DIY. For 3 phase power, you'd need 3 current transformers, and then something to interface them to (an arduino may fit the bill). Note, be sure you actually have 3-phase: most residential buildings use split-phase (in which case you ...


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Ccf stands for 100 cubic feet. So the meter is read 8953 hundred and 9035 hundred, or 895,300 cf and 903,500 cf respectively. More Info: When reading a meter, you'll notice each dial has an arrow. This arrow points the direction the needle spins. The number above the dial indicates how much the value increases, per revolution of that needle. For example. ...


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Based on my experience being qualified as a battery charging electrician on submarines and installing/upgrading/maintaining the 12v electrical system in my motorhome. Battery electrolyte specific gravity is not model or battery specific so your chart is fine. Amp-hours is a measurement of current consumed (or the sheer number of electrons you've pulled out ...


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I (literally) dug up the information on our water meter: Currently we have a 2" Neptune T-10 installed. On their website they offer specifications for their different meters, including charts of pressure drop vs. flow-rate. I used some free software to quickly digitize the plots and stick them together onto one chart showing the pressure drop vs. flow rate ...


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It's likely that the type of meter you have is called a PD meter. PD Meters are very accurate, but do this at the expense of pressure. My guess is that increasing the volume of the meter likely does do a little to reduce pressure drop. However, without the actual specs for each meter, it's impossible to say how much. That said, **it is highly unlikely ...


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Your second set of readings is correct. The meter face clearly states that for the left most dial, the scale is 1,000,000 cf per revolution. Thus each digit on that dial represents 100,000 cf. Each dial to the right is 1/10 of that to it's left. So each digit for the 4 dials, from left to right, indicates 100,000; 10,000; 1000; and 100 cf, respectively. ...


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You should check KWh meters that support the S0 interface that provides a pulse output. I have something like this http://www.produktinfo.conrad.com/datenblaetter/125000-149999/125363-an-01-ml-WechselstrZaeh_Geco32_230V32A_LCD_de_en_fr.pdf i think this one is as well able to do it ...



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