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11

After cutting the bolt to length, use a stationary grinder instead of a file to clean up your work. With a grinder, it's easy to square up the end of the bolt and apply the chamfer that you want. Just be careful, especially if the bolt is shorter than the grinder's table. If the bolt is short, use a pair of vice grips to hold the bolt during grinding. And ...


10

This stuff is sick: http://www.evaporust.com/ I used it on a drill press my buddy left out on a patio in the rain for a year. Virtually no scrubbing. I don't understand how this is not one of the most widely known products in the world. It is THAT good. I guess with the military as a client, they don't need the business from the public. Here are some ...


10

A knockout punch is typically capable of going through thicker metal - at the very least, it will do it faster. A quick search easily finds knock-out punches that can do 10 gauge steel, where most step bits don't seem like they'd do well beyond 16 gauge (though I can't find anything that really says the limit). For thin metal though, the step drill bit is ...


8

There are several online metal suppliers that will also make custom cuts. Online Metals is one that I have used. There is a minimum length that you must order (usually 1 ft) and a charge per cut. Depending on where you live you might also find a local metal supplier that can do the same for you. Wherever you order, I'd suggest you get two 5" pieces ...


5

You can make watertight trays from flat sheet metal without soldering or riviting. Take a sheet of metal whose length is the length of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides; width is the width of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides. Fold the sheet so it ends up looking like this: You can fold up one side at a ...


5

As Karl recommends, drilling dry with a metal drill bit (HSS or Carbide) is the basic information that you need. As far as drilling speed goes, you can refer to a cutting speed chart and do a bit of math. Aluminum's cutting speed is 350-400 fpm or 106,680-121,920 mm/minute. The distance travelled by a point on the outermost edge of the bit during one ...


5

Based on questions answered in chat you have a case where the contractor didn't measure the deck properly, and built it too high, could not flash properly under the door frame, and performed a "some genius" move putting a transition strip (meant for interior use) over top of the door frame and the vinyl, with caulk under neath. Stupid. Two options: 1 ...


4

I don't know about the machine, but depending on the size of the wire and the length, you can straighten it by holding one end in a vise and then holding the other end in a pliers and giving it a quick jerk. It takes a little practice but it works quite well. However I would hesitate to use this technique on wire you plan to use for household wiring. If ...


4

If you're trying to cut in place, I'd personally go with drilling an initial hole, and then cutting the shape of the vent with a "sheet metal nibbler". The nibbler will let you cut from one side, as there's a small bit that you insert into the hole, and sheers off a small roll of material (somewhere near 1/8", depending on the exact pair). You can also ...


4

Is the garage door made out of steel? Here is a good article on repainting rusty steel: I think the key is to prep by washing the area and then removing as much rust as possible by scraping and then using a wire brush (or even sanding). Prime the area with Rustoleum. The topcoat should be high quality latex exterior paint.


4

Based on the clarifications, I would recommend using a reusable thread-locking liquid. Here is a link to one I found that may work. I have not used it. Vibra-Tite VC3 Threadmate http://www.vibra-tite.com (I am in no way affiliated with the Vibra-Tite Company)


4

If you can remove the entire face plate use regular paint stripper. When you get it down to bare metal you can polish the surface with scotchbrite pads or steelwool. You might find something to attach to your drill to make this part easier. Once you get the finish you are looking for cover it with clear enamal to protect it. If you can't get an acceptable ...


4

The bases of the stand look as if the pole is welded to it. Unless you have welding skills, cutting at the base probably will not work. The top appears to consist of a thinner pole that the speaker is attached to, inserted into a slightly larger pole that is attached to the base. In addition, there is a locking knob that seems to go through a threaded hole ...


4

The punch suggested by SpectralGhost is a good idea. If that doesn't work, you can make a jig with three pieces of 2x4. Screw the pieces together and drill a pilot hole for the drill bit (the dotted line) using the same size bit you intend to use on the pipe.


3

You can use a Dremel cutoff wheel to cut off a piece of the rod but you may have to remove the rod to do this. You can use Dremel grinding wheels to grind down the end of the rod. If the rod is not protruding out of the hole, you could use a wooden plug to seal off the hole. Sand the plug flush with the bench top.


3

Wrap the pipe with masking tape,mark the height with a pen so you have a precise line.As @ dbracey has suggested use a pipe cutter. The tape will protect the finish from the quide roller of the cutter. Any type of rotary saw will generate enough heat to mar the finish. Also cutting a straight line with a saw will be difficult.


3

Examine the where the pole connects to the base, looking to see if you can easily remove the base. If you can, then what you want to do is cut the bottom off the pole and re-attach the base. You will need a hacksaw and a miterbox to get a square cut (OR a large pipecutter (you can rent those at local tool rental) OR a chopsaw with abrasive blade)). You ...


3

You may have a damaged/stripped bolt or threaded hole. Check to see if the threads on the bolt are damaged then you will need to purchase a new bolt. If the threads in the hole are damaged you will need to install a threaded insert or use a tap and die set.


3

Bread Tin Corner. How to make a water holding container without needing to solder it has been an age old necessity. You'll still see them used in cheaper bread pans, though hydroforming or stamping have taken over for the most part.


3

This a is a very interesting question. I must assume, hopefully not wrongly, you are talking about a main supply line from the street. I can see no reason for an in house line to be embedded in the floor unless it feeds an out building or the like. In any case, an in-house line could be tracked back to some point of source and rerouted if necessary. As for a ...


3

You have the basics down pat. The key to getting the threads working properly is: Squaring off the thread end of the bolt. Yes, the hacksaw blade will follow the threads slightly. If you have a bandsaw with a stock holding vise that can be squared to the blade, run a single nut on so the hexes will hold the bolt in place as straight to the blade as ...


3

You are doing it the optimal way for somebody that just does it occaisonally. A cut that is more square across the bolt (OK - orthogonal...) can be had by using a motorized chop saw with an abrasive blade, an a grinder will help the clean-up, like Caleb says. If you were to do it this way, you don't need the nut threaded on to clean out the threads. ...


3

Rather than attack the window itself, I'd re-install it. Usually there's a gap around the frame filled with spray foam insulation. Take the trim off the inside to see it. You'll also see a bunch of screws that hold the window frame to the house frame. See if you can take them out. Once this is done, you can scrape off the spray foam with a stiff knife. ...


3

"Siding Corner Caps" Or often just tin caps. They should be available. Or you could have some fabricated, or perhaps adapt some intended for other siding materials. Install by running a thin bead of caulk along the end of each clapboard, slide the top under the upper course and press into the caulk. Nail underneath at each corner with a small corrosion ...


3

It may be that the frame was originally designed to have slats span the rails, and not have the mattress (box spring) sit directly on the rails. This would have lifted the mattress up a bit, and possibly allowed it to ride over the bits that are giving you trouble. This was one persons solution:


3

For getting paint off a door, I highly recommend using Citrus Strip. We tried it on our old wooden door and it worked great, taking off multiple layers of paint. It doesn't work as well under a lot of sun and heat, so I would recommend either taking the door off the hinges or erecting some sort of tarp to block the sun from hitting it directly. Then get a ...


3

If you don't want to strip the new paint off, you can sand it to smooth out the rough areas. Go over it with a 150 grit first, then go over it a second time with 220 or 340. You can use a sanding sponge to get into the tight details. Be sure to clean it well after sanding, completely dust free this time. If possible, pull the hinge pins and remove the ...


3

Are you taking about one of these things? If so, you might not want to cut it down. The lip should be a bit higher than the surrounding grade so that rainwater doesn't run in to the well. If you don't cut it, you might be able to decorate it. However, if you really want to cut it then you can use a reciprocating saw. If the metal is too thick, you ...


3

The finish shown is a type of paint - "Hammerite" is either the name, or the brand name of the most popular/first version. It's presumably on mild steel. However, any automotive paint should work (think about it) - and COULD be cheap if you have a cooperative paint shop and you don't care what color it is (ie, they can spray some excess when they spray ...



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