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11

After cutting the bolt to length, use a stationary grinder instead of a file to clean up your work. With a grinder, it's easy to square up the end of the bolt and apply the chamfer that you want. Just be careful, especially if the bolt is shorter than the grinder's table. If the bolt is short, use a pair of vice grips to hold the bolt during grinding. And ...


8

A hack saw is a fine tool to cut fairly thin gauge tubing (which this seems to be). You may want to use a jig of some sort, such as a miterbox, to keep your cut square to the piece. Tape around the diameter to minimize chipping of the finish. File down the cut edge to remove the burrs from sawing, using a metal file, followed by emory paper. If there is a ...


8

There are several online metal suppliers that will also make custom cuts. Online Metals is one that I have used. There is a minimum length that you must order (usually 1 ft) and a charge per cut. Depending on where you live you might also find a local metal supplier that can do the same for you. Wherever you order, I'd suggest you get two 5" pieces ...


7

Right snips are the most often used and it is possible to use only them, but if you want a neat and professional finish I would advise getting both right- and left-cutting, considering they are not that expensive for a decent set. If you are a beginner with corrugated it may be worth getting offset snips if you're planning on cutting the length of sheets. ...


6

A hacksaw would definitely get the job done. If you're looking for a power-tool version, a Reciprocating saw is the (fun) way to go. Probably not a good thing to use a jig saw on as usually they are intended for making more precise cuts, hence are slower.


6

I used to use a 7 1/4" metal cutting wheel on a circular saw. Works good, but wheel wears down fairly fast. There are also some good shear attachments that mount on drills. I'd advise you to make the cuts on the end going to the top, not the exposed bottom. Definitely have some spray paint or primer to treat the cut end, because it will rust. If you put ...


4

If you're trying to cut in place, I'd personally go with drilling an initial hole, and then cutting the shape of the vent with a "sheet metal nibbler". The nibbler will let you cut from one side, as there's a small bit that you insert into the hole, and sheers off a small roll of material (somewhere near 1/8", depending on the exact pair). You can also ...


4

You have numerous options: Drill out the screws with a drill bit larger than the screw diameter. Use a hand hack saw to cut it into manageable pieces. Use a reciprocating saw - a "Sawzall" to cut it into manageable pieces. Beat it into submission with a sledge hammer until it folds and bends and breaks (get medieval on it!) My recommendation would be the ...


4

The bases of the stand look as if the pole is welded to it. Unless you have welding skills, cutting at the base probably will not work. The top appears to consist of a thinner pole that the speaker is attached to, inserted into a slightly larger pole that is attached to the base. In addition, there is a locking knob that seems to go through a threaded hole ...


3

NOt as High Tech as Bib's answer but its still popular and only requires a bit of elbow grease. A hand held hacksaw with a blade designed for steel. TIPS The blades sharp edges need to curve/point towards yourself (called a pull-cut orientation). So it will cut when you pull back. Otherwise you will have a really hard time doing this. Apparently a ...


3

You can use a Dremel cutoff wheel to cut off a piece of the rod but you may have to remove the rod to do this. You can use Dremel grinding wheels to grind down the end of the rod. If the rod is not protruding out of the hole, you could use a wooden plug to seal off the hole. Sand the plug flush with the bench top.


3

Wrap the pipe with masking tape,mark the height with a pen so you have a precise line.As @ dbracey has suggested use a pipe cutter. The tape will protect the finish from the quide roller of the cutter. Any type of rotary saw will generate enough heat to mar the finish. Also cutting a straight line with a saw will be difficult.


3

Examine the where the pole connects to the base, looking to see if you can easily remove the base. If you can, then what you want to do is cut the bottom off the pole and re-attach the base. You will need a hacksaw and a miterbox to get a square cut (OR a large pipecutter (you can rent those at local tool rental) OR a chopsaw with abrasive blade)). You ...


3

Some times tightening the screw helps un stick it.I don't mean turning it a full quarter tighten but use some force. If you hear it click/budge a bit- Spray WD-40 on it then untighten it, spray WD-40(only a short spray-don't drown it), repeat over and over and the distance will get larger and larger and eventually you will be able to unscrew with ease. By ...


3

You have the basics down pat. The key to getting the threads working properly is: Squaring off the thread end of the bolt. Yes, the hacksaw blade will follow the threads slightly. If you have a bandsaw with a stock holding vise that can be squared to the blade, run a single nut on so the hexes will hold the bolt in place as straight to the blade as ...


3

You are doing it the optimal way for somebody that just does it occaisonally. A cut that is more square across the bolt (OK - orthogonal...) can be had by using a motorized chop saw with an abrasive blade, an a grinder will help the clean-up, like Caleb says. If you were to do it this way, you don't need the nut threaded on to clean out the threads. ...


3

Quoting from the Norton Catalog: .035, .040, .045, .060 Where fast cutting and low kerf loss are desired .090, .125 For tough cutting and notching applications where stability is important I would also expect that longevity plays into the equation for industrial applications (not something a DIY-er needs to care about)


2

Rather than trying to cut holes and add vents, you could also replace these with vented soffit skirting. E.g. This one can be picked up from your local HI store:


1

Step one - personal protective gear! High speed, low pressure, and try to avoid sideways (flat way on the disk) movement or twisting in the cut. If the motor bogs down, reduce pressure. Edit: unless your abrasive wheels actually mention a top speed, and it's lower than the fastest your machine goes. Expect to break some - aside from the hot sparks, ...


1

My favorite technique (if I don't care to load a 12" metal cutoff blade in my miter saw) is have a helper slowly rotate cylinder (works well with large PVC, too) away from me while I hold a 4 1/2 angle grinder with a metal blade. Start by wrapping blue tape around the leg. The same rotation technique with a pencil will yield a cut line. A tight string ...


1

Remember, cast iron is brittle. A chain-breaker does not actually cut it, it cracks and separates it. You can use the same principle: use the angle grinder make a groove to weaken material around the perimeter of the material right where you want it to break. Then allow the grinding wheel to penetrate all the way through at only a single spot (a 1/4" or ...


1

You can make a good cutting blade for sheet metal roofing out of a cheap circular saw blade. Go find your old used circular wood cutting blades, without carbide teeth, or buy the cheapest circular saw blade you can buy. There is no point in messing up a good carbide tooth blade. They can be easily re-sharpened. Circular saw blades usually cut about 1/8 ...


1

You could use most kinds of metal cutting tools - but go for a relatively fine one, whether it be a small circular saw on a Dremel tool, or a fine jigsaw or something else. No matter what cutting tool you use, you should expect some sharp edges or burrs, so be prepared to file them down smooth. You will then probably need to weld the bracket back on to the ...



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