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2

Let me spin this in a slightly different direction: If I use a wood rule, it's because I like the feel of the wood and/or need the rigidity or straight edge. Or nonconductive. If I use a rigid metal rule, it's because it's more accurate than a tape measure and/or I need the rigidity or straight edge. If I use dividers, or a story stick, or something of ...


1

Nowadays, the only place I regularly see them used are with masons. Mason's rules have sizes and lengths for standard cinderblocks and bricks printed on them (for measuring multiple courses with the appropriate number of mortar lines, etc.) I still reach for my smaller folding rule when making decorative boxes; though I might just as likely reach for a ...


1

A measurement by a rule will usually be more accurate than a tape measure and will not bend. You can hold a rule against a flat object much more securely than can be done with a tape measure. Also, if you have a machinist's rule that is accurate to the end, you can scribe using the end of the rule, something that is impossible with a tape measure.


2

Wood rules work great when it is impractical to use a tape measure. They are great in tight areas, or when you are measuring small distances. When you do use one, just make sure that it is accurate.


3

You should use the wood rules when: you have a beard prefer flannel use only hand tools prefer your lattes with artisan made, gluten free, non-dairy, coconut milk live in Brooklyn, NY or Portland, OR


1

No real "should" here as far as I know. sometimes a wooden rule can be stiffer, and it has the nifty feature of being able to do some interesting stuff with angles/trigonometry due to having hinges regularly spaced... but I would just call those handy features rather than rules.



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