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10

1) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'T' cross section. Cut a slot down the middle of the 81" edge of the panel to accommodate it. Dry fit, then assemble with construction adhesive. If desired, 'pin' the T-bar in place with nails or screws through the surface of the door. ... or ... 2) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'U' cross section and 1.5" outside ...


6

How much the shelves will sag depends not only on the materials you use, but also whether or not the shelves are fixed, whether there's a hardwood strip along the length, and how they are attached. The magic number to watch out for is 1/32" (about 0.8 mm) of sag per foot. MDF is incredibly heavy - your bookshelves will weigh a ton if you construct them ...


4

If it is MDF or HDF (as opposed to particleboard) then I would choose the fiberboard over ply. Any surface wear will impact the finish laminate, regardless of the underlying material. By contrast, MDF/HDF should be more impact resistance, water/mold resistant and uniform in density and composition. MDF above: more uniform and dense. Particle below, less ...


4

You shouldn't have any problems using MDF. A lot of modern cabinets are made out of MDF these days as it's a cheap material to use. It comes in a variety of thicknesses so you'll be able to get one that meets your requirements. You need to wear a mask when cutting and sanding it as the dust is not very nice. It takes paint well and you should have no ...


4

Unfortunately forever is simply impossible ;) Without knowing what/how these planks are going to be used, it is difficult to provide a great answer. I have no real experience with liquid nail, but have used similar types of glue with success, but again, without the what/how you indeed to use these planks... I can't say too much for your case. One issue ...


4

I would use MDF. It is uniform, takes paint well and doesn't warp. It also routes well. It should hold the weight I'd expect in a bookshelf (supported at both sides, about 30" wide and no deeper than 18") If you're really concerned with the sagging you might add a single center support bracket.


3

I would select the product based on the appearance and durability of the finish laminate alone, with little concern for the substrate material, assuming the substrate is some viable material and not pressed paper pulp or something else obviously inferior. For identical finish laminates, MDF would be preferable to plywood as it is denser and more ...


3

There's many variables, many choices. You could just slam some screws into the shelf edges and it may be adequate. Pocket screws are a big improvement because you are no longer screwing into the panel edges. They work really well in cabinet face frames because there is plenty of room for screw embedment. For a bookcase, embedment is limited, so you should ...


3

You probably want an epoxy based filler such as Bondo. A variety of manufacturers have a version of this. These products are a little more complicated to use than traditional wood fillers, but they are pretty impervious to moisture once they harden. You need to mix small batches that can be used in a few minutes. Nitrile/latex gloves are a must. Once ...


2

I would not use MDF in an area with lots of moisture like a bathroom or a garage. It will swell up and degrade quickly if it gets wet. If you do use it in a wet area seal it up well.


2

My suggestion would be to embed square tube stock steel into the MDF and epoxy it in. I recently did this exact thing with MDF subtop for my granite counters and uses a polyurethane glue to embed the steel. Check out the pictures here: Can I support a granite countertop overhang with embedded steel bars? Square stock is rigid and cheap. Route a channel ...


2

Nail it. You will forever regret a decision to glue the casing if it ever comes to a need to do repairs or modifications.


1

Pine. It is the the only one of the choices (other than plywood) that will give a natural wood finish easily. Also its edges do not need special treatment, unlike plywood. While veneer makes all of the other choices feasible for finish, that is a complex process on a multifaceted model. Every face and visible edge needs to be precisely laminated. Pine is ...


1

There's no reason you can't leave it as-is as long as you are happy with the appearance. A lot of new homes in large developments don't have much more on the walls either. You could have also used a primer/paint combo product and not have to apply any additional layers at all.


1

Although MDF is more stable than solid wood, I won't claim that it will not swell enough with enough humidity to break the joints at the corners as solid wood will if there is no room for expansion, did that my self with a single panel in a 24" cabinet door 20 years ago never again... The strength of the door needs to be in the joinery, not the panel. There ...


1

In most localities it is illegal to permanently block a window from the inside only. The reason being in an emergency fire fighters may waste time trying to enter a blocked window. The amount of difficulty to do it properly will vary based mostly on the type of exterior siding. I would remove the window, frame it in with 2x4's or what ever the wall is framed ...


1

Liquid Nails comes in various formulations, some better than others. Of this type adhesive, polyurethane based of any brand will give the best bond, as Jon Raynor suggested. I don't have hard data, and again it varies by formulation, but epoxy should give an equal or better bond than polyurethane, and is less susceptible to creep deformation. Epoxies that ...


1

End-grain gluing does not work very well with MDF, if you want to use glue i would recommend using dados, but with 3/4" mdf it weakens it a lot, maybe gluing 2 planks and then cutting some dados. And if youre going to use screws you need long and coarse thread screws so the mdf doesn't get damaged. But there's an easier way than using screws: shelve pins ...


1

If you are willing to invest a little, I would consider pocket screws. The joint will be considerably stronger than edge-screwing. Just drill the pocket holes, apply glue, and screw together. This joinery method is perfect for a novice woodworker. Simple, almost impossible to mess up, and does not require precision or specialized skills. I have used ...


1

I built a bookcase from 3/4" (19 mm) MDF back in 1985 to hold heavy, oversize college textbooks. It's three feet wide with two twelve inch deep, fourteen inch tall shelves. It has not bowed under the weight in 27 years. The shelves are are attached to the side uprights with four screws on each end. The back is 1/8" masonite, well secured with screws. 1.5 ...



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