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12

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


7

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


7

Looking at your pic, I think you have a couple of problems to solve. the reason the bricks broke in the first place is that the base under the edge of the bricks is too low or uneven. This cause the edge of the bricks to break under pressure. I also see that the crack has traveled further to the inside brick and that one as well as the mortar joint is ...


7

Mortar is not waterproof. However, there are products that can be applied to mortar (and other concrete materials), that can make the mortar waterproof.


6

Quikrete FASTSET Repair Mortar is a great product. The biggest difference between it and a typical type S mortar is that it is "fastset" (duh) meaning it will be hard in about 20 min. Not cured, but hardened. And that it is intended for commercial use as it will eventually reach 6000 psi after it's full 28 day cure. This product does not need any bonding ...


6

If by HMA you mean Hot-Melt Adhesive, that stuff is for arts & crafts, not construction. You should be using construction adhesive. LOCTITE®, LIQUID NAILS®, DAP®, and possibly other adhesive manufacturers offer a molding adhesive.


6

It occurred to me that this project might benefit from a single piece stone cap and eliminate lintel altogether. You could incorporate a bit of slope and weather proof the structure. A stone supply house could fashion it out of limestone. More traditional lintel: This window drawing is pretty analogous to a mailbox opening: You are probably building a ...


5

First of all, I hope the mortar wasn't concrete. Concrete and mortar, while related, are two different things. Mortar is meant to be softer and give (rather than the brick or stone giving and thereby cracking). The proper solution is to re-tuck-point the joint. That means chip/grind out the old mortar and put new mortar back in. Alas, mortared steps are ...


5

You could try some "No Nails" or equivalent, though as you say it shouldn't be necessary. The size of screw you are using will determine the size of the anchor you use. This in turn will determine the size of hole you drill. The anchor should fit snugly into the hole and even require a light tap with a small hammer to ensure it fits flush with the surface. ...


5

It is efflorescence. Water picks up minerals in the mortar and transports them until the water evaporates, leaving the minerals behind. Other than cosmetic issues, this is normally harmless, though if the process continues for a long period, enough minerals can be removed that the mortar sort of rots. Only close inspection will indicate if the mortar is ...


5

Considering how little exposure you will get to the mortar for your small project, you're probably fine with just your work gloves. Wearing latex gloves under your work gloves will provide additional protection. I would suggest that for the people who will be working directly with the mortar. Big picture, more important than gloves is breathing protection. ...


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


4

Paint difficulties can be resolved by scraping and priming with a shellac or oil based primed. I prefer the polyurethane based construction adhesives for strength and toughness. Their down side is cure time (overnight) Another scheme would be to cut back the plaster to 75% of the baseboard height with a diamond blade in an angle grinder (yes, very messy: ...


4

Cement surface and even paint (scarifed with 50 grit belt sander or similar) can stay, if both are well adhered.. An experiment is in order: Use a good quality thinset, (Laticrete Platinum 254 or Custom Flexbond) Trowel on 1/4 inch patch (4in x 4in or so). Wait 24 hours Chip off patch with a chisel Observe the removed thinset: If it cleaves off ...


4

They make them. Not concrete blocks per se but other precast concrete units. You'll need to find out if you're local suppliers carry them or you have a precast stone manufacturer near you. The family of products you're talking about, which includes not only the half round but other shapes, are called concrete coping stones. That should help you ask around ...


4

Insulation value of masonry walls vs wood-frame walls You should be able to find guidance. For example Scottish Guidance, UK Guidance In the UK, I believe regulations specify maximum U-values U-values are measured in watts per square metre per degree Kelvin (W/m²K). So for example, if we consider a double glazed window with a U-value of 2.8, for ...


4

There is a product called Sure Klean® that is used nowadays. I am sure there are other brands out there too. Muriatic acid used to be used, at least it was when I was a masons helper, but I think Its availability is regulated. Sure-Klean has it, just in small amounts I guess. It needs to be diluted and protection worn, it pretty caustic stuff, so read the ...


4

Since you're working with other minors, at a very minimum, you should follow OSHA guidelines: Skin Irritation: Wet portland cement can cause caustic burns, sometimes referred to as cement burns. Cement burns may result in blisters, dead or hardened skin, or black or green skin. In severe cases, these burns may extend to the bone and cause disfiguring ...


4

Those are terra cotta blocks. They are, indeed, hollow. You could drill (carefully! Terra Cotta is fragile when drilling) and fill each and every block with low expansion foam (has normal expansion foam could break the blocks). But that would be a huge project. And you'd still have major thermal bridging issues along the edges of each brick. It'd be much ...


4

Depending on where you live, reclaimed brick can be very inexpensive. The same theory still applies: if there's a problem in the future, just pull up the bricks and re-level the bed. However, bricks are thicker than bluestone, so will you have less stone/sand between the brick and the roots, and thus less room for adjustment. Another possibility is just ...


3

A mid size rotary hammer (SDS plus or SDS max) with a point and a chisel will break the bricks out. Have an extra manual chisel, mason's hammer and prybar on hand (to free the rotary hammer, when you get carried away and plunge too deep). Hand, eye and head (hard hat) protection are advised. Dust masks, too.


3

Just get replacement windows instead of new construction and use tapcons to fasten the windows through the sides. Caulk outside good to keep out water. Foundation should also be graded away from the window to keep out water.


3

If you don't want to remove your drywall, then putting full sized bricks is not a good idea! Tying into the drywall is also bad idea- it would most likely rip out and will absorb any dampness locked in between all the walls. There are solution out there where you put look alike bricks that are just a fraction of the weight and there is adhesive that is ...


3

You have divots in a concrete driveway. I'd saw around the divot area, break it all out, and pour concrete, rather than anything to do with asphalt. Drill some holes in the edges and insert steel to tie the patch to the slab. If following the "quick fix" fill-on-top approach, possibly thinset (tile cement) but trying to do anything with concrete in the ...


3

My house was built in the 1880s and has a stone foundation, mostly sand stone. The best fix for situations like this I have found is building a form and packing in stiff cement and as large of pieces of the original rock as I can get. If you do the form in a couple layers (say using a 2x4 or 2x6, the long way). Let the cement s set around 24 hours and brush ...


3

If you'd like to minimize use of concrete, don't use any. I have 4 sheds that have been sitting for 14 years on sections of pressure treated wood, set on top of the ground - and a 5th that's on 4 pressure treated wood posts set into the ground. No concrete at all. Wooden floors (not pressure treated - only the ground-contact wood is PT.) Nice and dry.


3

The foam you suggest will work well for what you want to do. Do not over fill the cavity, leave room for expansion of the foam. After it cures in a couple of hours, poke it in a little, maybe an inch, more would not hurt. Clean off the skin of foam that is left so the new cement bonds with the old. The act of pushing in to compress the foam should relieve a ...


3

Yes, mortar is waterproof. It is "relatively unaffected" by water "under specified conditions". Water-proof or water-resistant describes objects relatively unaffected by water or resisting the ingress of water under specified conditions. –Waterproofing, Wiki However, anything claiming waterproof is likely a long way away from being watertight or ...


3

There is no way you touch those bricks. This is an exterior wall. You are weakening the bricks, you are allowing for more entry points for moisture and vapor (your insulation won't cover every hole like the bricks are), some of these will break, and so on. Please erase this idea from your mind as it is one of those things that you would do that would be ...



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