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7

This is a tough one. There is no easy way to remedy your problem. The best way would be to remove and replace the tiles properly. If in fact the tiles are real marble, you can grind them to create the proper angle and slowly refinish the surface by stepping down grits and finally getting to a wet polish grit of 2400. That is actually impracticable for a DIY ...


5

Alternative idea. Test the sealer on a piece of left over tile. Let the sealer get onto the glass and wipe it up shortly thereafter. Compare the before/after -- if you see no notable damage, just put the stuff on and have someone clean up the glass right behind you.


4

Assuming you don't have extensive scratching or damage to your countertops, sometimes a simple acrylic sealer/refinsiher will work great. You will need to clean the tops thoroughly with a non abrasive cleaner and rinse completely. After they are dry, simply apply the acrylic sealer with a lint free smooth cloth evenly over the whole surface. Let this dry ...


3

Yes, your plan sounds perfectly fine, initially. But, that deep of a divot for such a small area is concerning to me. I'd take the plywood up or drill an inspection hole in the ceiling below to see what's going on. To me it sounds like it could be 1 of 3 things: 1- The plywood is cracked & therefore compromised, so it should be cut-out & replaced ...


3

You mean as a backsplash? Just about any material can be used: ceramic, glass, vinyl, ABS, wood, aluminum, steel, contact paper, etc. See this gallery for many ideas. While most of them are ceramic tile, which is the current fashion, look carefully and you'll see vinyls which look metallic. Here is Home Depot's version of that. We are considering that ...


3

The easy thing to do would be Liquid Nails and I am pretty sure they have a stone version. A better solution would be some thinset. I do not agree with silicone because it has a little give in it. After a while of kicking or stepping on it will lose its grip a bit and eventually come loose.


3

The guy at the store is correct. If the marble is not taking on any water now it is because they are sealed, it is a maintenance item, that will need to be resealed every 5 years at the least with heavy traffic, 7-10 years with light traffic with a penetrating sealer. A kitchen floor is definitely heavy traffic. The porcelain tile is non porous, just the ...


3

Even without knowing how thick it is or how heavy, that's a lot of marble. You really need to attach this to something, somewhere. The wall, the floor... Without that, you would have to have a serious counterweight at the bottom, at least as heavy or heavier than the marble. Why not just attach it to the wall or the floor? When your child's health is at ...


3

Anchoring them to studs is just fine, your main problem is going to be getting brackets that will support that amount of weight. The amount of weight each bracket will support will be printed on the package. I would consult your granite or stone supplier for weights of their products. You MUST make sure that you're anchored into studs, though, and ...


3

I'd say shirlock's answer is really the proper way to handle it. If you're looking for a quick fix, perhaps a rubber threshhold seal could be applied with silicon caulk. The key would be to find one that looks not-ugly, which may be the bigger challenge.


3

I would suggest that to get a really smooth polish you will be using sand paper or polishing pads with grit numbers as fine as 3000 or more. The general advice is to switch to the next finer grit when you no longer see any remaining grooves or roughness left by the previous grit. You may need to experiment with looking at the area that you are polishing ...


2

Since you're going to be doing delicate work, it calls for delicate application. Use artists brushes. Flat brush for the marble: Filbert brush for the grout: It'll be slow but it'll be precise.


2

You would normally clean marble with etch spots with hydrogen peroxide or bleach and then repolish. From the sound of it yours may be more severely damaged. I would try both on a small spot and see how it goes. If your marble is actually corroded then you will have to polish until you hit uncorroded marble.


2

To expand on wallyk's answer: nearly anything. It's really entirely up to you. The main two things to consider are maintainability (how easy is it to keep clean) and aesthetics (what do you like?) The range of options can include (but is not limited to): Tiles Ceramic (as you mention) glass metal stone etc Metal stainless steel copper etc ...


1

Shop for a stainless steel sink with integrated drainboard. Some designs even have an apron front to eliminate the strip of countertop in front of the sink. If you can find a suitable one in the right size, you can make the countertop out of strips and the drainboard will cover the joins. The strips should be synthetic lumber such as polyurethane or ...


1

There may be several causes for tiles becoming loose. The most popular are: 1). sub-floor not level. An un-even floor won't fully support the tiles. The unsupported area of the tile will slightly flex and overtime will magnify its' motion until it loosens completely. 2). Thin-set not mixed or not properly applied. The cement adhesive needs to be mixed ...


1

If your counter did not come with a backsplash, you could have a small one (6 inches high or so) made to match the counter and then just paint above that.


1

A diamond hole saw will do the job, use plenty of water and light pressure. You will do better with a single hole, AFA breakage goes, compared to making 2 edge semi circles. Update If we are talking about a toilet flange, there are 2 methods, each with variations, depending on your equipment. With a tile wet saw, raise and lower the blade such ...


1

White thinset is always used on light colored marble, you used the right stuff. Give it a few days, it will turn back to the dry color. I see Kerdi around the niche. Are you planning on running Kerdi in the rest of the shower?


1

Deep scratches and broken edges are a bad sign. If you want to learn about stone polishing, this would be a good learner project. Don't expect to be able to craft a Michelangelo. A matte finish would be reasonable, and expect to leave the deeper scratches in place. Matte marble finish should be polished out to 1500 grit. Gloss finish out to 3000 and ...



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