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1

I would go with pine because it has a look that is close to maple but not exactly and I think a good pine trim is probably my preferred wood type. Oak would stand out too much. You want something to complement what you have not draw a person's eyes to it. So I would say pine or maple (if you can find maple trim in your area).


1

I used poplar in my home, it is cheap compared to other off the shelf materials. It took stain very well, but a word of caution, the heartwood of poplar is green, takes stain well, and when it ages it turns a nice shade of brown from UV exposure. The sapwood is the bad guy here, it is really light in color, as soaks up the stain, so much so, that if there ...


2

If you want to color maple, you might investigate dyes rather than stains - leaves much more of the grain visible. If you're going to stain it anyway, poplar (in the lumber trade that almost always means tulip poplar) is a nice, cheap, stable wood. Has a somewhat greenish cast, but dark stain will obliterate it. Responding to Jack's comment: I've posted ...


1

To prevent warping in the future, put a coat of finish on the back side similar (or the same as) what you put on the front side. Kerfing is only needed to make it bend more easily where the wall is curved, if it does not conform to the wall with a reasonable amount of pressure. The other stock piece of word-warping-wisdom (since unlike pre-shaped baseboard, ...


5

The main reason the recess is in the back of all moldings is to "thin" the wood, reducing the amount of continuous rings in the wood that helps control cupping. There is a fringe benefit of that relief in the back of trim, it helps get past some irregularities in the wall. I have had more problems with that relief cut than benefits when it come to base. The ...



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