Hot answers tagged

24

Almost all of the Home Depots that I do business with have short term rental trucks available right in their parking lots for very reasonable rates. Call in and reserve one for a particular time. Drive to the Home Depot in your car and park it in the lot. Go inside and checkout the truck. Then drive it up and load all of your materials and head home with it ...


16

You didn't mention how you're using the ratchet straps, but from your concern about slipping, I think it's possible that you could be using them to better advantage. So I apologize if this is what you're already planning to do, but just on the off chance it isn't... For the MDF, you want the straps going over the edge of the MDF and running straight down to ...


15

Technically, the 1x8 is 3/4" THICK, not "high". That's nitpicking, though. A 1x8 is always specified as a "1x8", never by actual stock thickness in softwoods (ie pine). A nominal 1" plank will always be 3/4" thick after planing, a nominal 2" plank will always be 1-1/2" thick after planing. Width is a little different, but follows generally the same rules - ...


12

From the similarity of the lines, I'd say you pulled something out of the old 2x4 (nails) and dragged them across the board, perhaps as you twisted and pulled to separate/remote the board from wherever it was before. I don't believe there are any insects that travel in perfect unison like that.


10

You have to cut the wood somehow... You can give your blades a wipedown with a slightly damp rag to remove sawdust particles (let them air-dry well afterward), but I wouldn't worry too much. Corrosion involving PT lumber is mostly a problem with long-term contact; the copper compounds in the chemical treatment are more "galvanically noble" than many common ...


9

The following information is from Norway, but I would expect that the same dimensions are used elsewhere in Europe. The system used there parallels what we have here in the U.S., but the actual dimensions are different. Colloquially, terms like “two-by-four” are used, but the actual millimeter sizes are used in price lists, etc. The dimensions referred ...


8

You won't want to use pressure treated wood in any application where people will be touching the wood often, especially children. Cedar is a good wood for outdoor applications, and is often used in playhouses and swing sets. If you've got really deep pockets, Teak is a very good choice for outdoor applications. Teak is often used in higher end patio ...


8

You need to calculate the outward force. Assume 8' x 8' x 3' hot tub, filled to the top. 3 ft of head * 0.424 * 1(specific gravity of water) = 1.302 psi That's the pressure at the bottom. Obviously the pressure at the top is 0. If I were to sketch the pressure gradient, it would be a triangle, so we can easily calculate the average pressure as 1.302 /2 = ...


8

Most mills do not produce and sell treated wood rated for contact with the ground, so any wood in your deck that will be in contact with the ground should be treated, and gotten wherever it is to be got. Buying wood from a mill is often cheaper, though it is not always. A smaller operation with a smaller economic influence (like most mills open to the ...


6

Unless you have a kiln to dry wood in, drying wood in a standard environment takes a really long time (if you buy firewood, usually you want ~2yr old wood!). I don't know that leaving it out for a couple weeks would dry it if it were so saturated that there is visible water coming out of it. It is recommended to let wood used for hardwoods sit a couple ...


6

Ok Jay. A PT post will last a long time in concrete, maybe 5 to 10 yrs in soil alone. I suggest you imbed the post in concrete, trowel a peak around the post so water runs off, and don't let the PT post come in contact with the ground. If you find the RV posts I mentioned earlier, they are steel , treated and when put in concrete will last 25 yrs or ...


6

Typically you would have the beam sit on top of the posts and use a post tie like this one:


6

Although both ways are advised by different sources, I have built dozens of decks in Maine as a contractor and have found that pressure treated and cedar boards almost always crown to the bark side and recommend the bark side face outward. Obviously this helps shed water and doesn't collect ice in pockets in the winter. Don't mix the methods as this can ...


6

As other's have pointed out, a square timber-framed hot tub is going to be a structural challenge. You're essentially building an above-ground pool--and you'll notice that they don't make above-ground pools in a square shape...namely because it's nearly impossible to support the water along the long edges. The solution is to go round. Then you can use ...


6

I would definitely use Pocket-hole joinery My brother got me a jig that is very easy to use, and the joints are incredibly strong even without wood glue; also if you use glue the joins are "self clamping". Basically this allows you to edge-join, or do 45 degree angles, etc. just by drilling a couple of perfectly angled holes and screwing the pieces ...


6

I think you're overthinking this. I carry all kinds of lumber on my roof rack all the time. The 2x4s are no problem at all. Just strap them down tight, one at the front bar and one at the back bar. Sheets goods are harder. Your drawing is completely not to scale and I think you will be surprised how big 4x8 is when you get it up there. However as long as ...


6

The MDF might be a problem. When driving at any appreciable speed the sheet will catch air and try to sail up and away. This is compounded by the air that is pushed up and over your hood and windshield, right up into the MDF. I had two sheets of particle board that broke off where the straps were holding them down. It wasn't a clean break :) I would ...


5

In Canada, while officially we are metric, all the construction work I've been around is done almost entirely in imperial. Everything comes in the same dimensions, and is referred to in feet and inches. Framing is done 16 or 24" on center, standard ceilings are 8' high. Part of this may just be a hold-over from years of everyone doing that way, and then ...


5

Strapping You could use some form of strapping on the back side. With this option, you can extend the strapping and use it to attach the whole bit to the workbench. Bored Holes You could bore holes on the edge of the top or bottom piece to about half the width of the board, then use screws to fasten the two boards together. You'll likely want to ...


5

The joists are almost certainly taking some tension load (keeping the walls from spreading) from the roof, at least, unless it's very strangely built. As is, given a quick look at load calculators and those inputs, probably not. even reducing live and dead loads to 20PSF (minimum live load for a "storage attic" and a pretty low storage load) and allowing ...


5

The main reason the recess is in the back of all moldings is to "thin" the wood, reducing the amount of continuous rings in the wood that helps control cupping. There is a fringe benefit of that relief in the back of trim, it helps get past some irregularities in the wall. I have had more problems with that relief cut than benefits when it come to base. The ...


5

I would cut off the timber in the ground using a Sawzall type tool (reciprocating saw) that has a long rough cut blade installed. You can get blades as long as 12 inches that can easily reach into tight spots and cut the wood. Soil will wear the teeth away fairly quickly and so be prepared to replace the blade. I've used this technique to cut roots free ...


4

I'm from all metric country, but lot of stuff in constructing busyness are in "cols" that is inches. Again things like 2" or 4" are around 5cm and 10cm, so it's all round numbers.


4

It's a bit wider than a typical US 2x4, but likely equivalent. A 2x4 that you get for building is 3.5"x1.5" so that would equate to 89x38mm.


4

As you say you want to use screws and it's non-structural, I'd go with: Get some 4" wood screws, drill half way down through the upper piece with a drill slightly bigger than the screw heads, you shouldn't need to do pilot holes all the way through as 2" really shouldn't split unless you use huge screws. I'd go with 4 or 5 screws along the length. Screw ...


4

Any 'credible and/or official sources' will tell you to hire a Structural Engineer, which is what I'll say also. There are too many variables and unknowns for Internet advice to suffice. Prepare well to minimize costs, supplying all dimensions and drawings, and schedule a site visit. The Engineer may be able to give the details for a top truss run ...


4

Use a prybar to lever up the treads about 1/8" and then use a Sawzall type reciprocating saw with a metal blade to cut the shank between the tread and the riser. Check to see if you can rent the reciprocting saw at a tool rental. The blades are readily available at any Hardware and Tool supply. You won't be wanting to drive back into the same hole as the ...


4

I don't think there is an exact answer here. Most of the issues you are talking about have more to do with the storage, age, time, and manufacturing of the lumber. So basically you will have a couple of people working at HD or Lowe's that contract out to mills or other lumber yards to get their pallets. Of course "older" lumber is cheaper. But you don't ...



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