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92

WD-40 isn't actually a true lubricant. WD stands for water displacing. The main use for WD-40 is as a solvent and a rust dissolver. The lubricant-like properties of WD-40 are from rapidly evaporating components. It won't last. True lubricants include things like silicone, grease, Teflon, graphite, etc. WD-40 can be good as a first go at things, it can help ...


36

Firearms - you should never use WD-40 to clean or maintain firearms. It's hygroscopic and will attract moisture to the firearm which will result in rust. Drive chains of any type - because WD-40 isn't a lubricant it really will not work well on Drive chains of any type. Gears of any type - WD-40 doesn't have enough lubrication affect to be useful on any ...


28

WD-40 does a lot of things, unfortunately this means that it does not do any one thing well. As a lubricant WD-40 is very thin and runny. WD-40 will lubricate for a short time, but will quickly run off. This is a side effect from it being a penetrant. If it was thicker for better lubrication it would not penetrate well. WD-40 is a GREAT quick-fix and ...


18

WD-40 is composed of many different chemicals, and only about 10-20% of these are lubricants. Even then this small amount is only a very light mineral lubricant. Most of the other components are intended to help penetration, but are volatile and are intended to evaporate. WD-40 does provide some longer term lubrication, but the problem is that the ...


15

OLD ANSWER (Improved below) Graphite powder is the preferred lubricant for locks. You should be able to get it at any hardware store in a squeeze bottle that is half air, allowing you to blow it right into the keyway. You are going to have to wait a while before putting it on, as the residual WD-40 will gum it up. EDIT: As per MrSquonk's ...


14

Oil of any kind is the wrong lube to use on hinges. Oil, WD40, or any petro based product wets the hinge surfaces and will collect dust and dirt. I always recommend dry silicone spray. Silicone works great, won't harm surrounding finishes etc. Some folks like graphite, but I find it a bit messy to use.


12

Properly lubricating the hinges should stop the squeaks. In short, you remove the hinges from the door, lubricate them, and put them back. You'll want to use white lithium grease. It works very well for metal on metal contact. I'm assuming simple door hinges here, like these You'll want to do each door one at time. Have someone support the door ...


10

The rail from the garage door should be lubricated with White Lithium Grease, whether it's a chain or a screw type. Run a bead of grease along the top of it, then run the garage door up and down a few times. The wheels, track and spring should be lubricated with your favorite lubricant oil -- not WD-40, which is a cleaner and penetrant, not a lube -- but ...


9

Lock cylinders. Never in lock cylinders. Doorknobs, padlocks, etc. - the residue left will just attract dirt & grit, and prematurely wear down the works. This was given me by a college friend whose dad worked on the maintenance staff - so they did a lot of locks!! It probably took years to see the pattern, but any lock they had shot with WD-40 ...


7

A PTFE (aka Teflon®) spray such as this should do the trick. They're widely available, and in several brands so you should be able to find one easily. The squeak comes mostly from the roller turning around its axle, so I spray a little in between them and spin the roller a few times to distribute it. Clean up any excess with a paper towel. I don't have ...


6

For locks that are in such bad shape that one is unable to get graphite powder in it, you can first use a little bit of LPS 1 (Greaseless lubricant). Do not use any kind of silicone lube, that's FAR worse than WD-40 (I had a guy come in with a couple locks he'd done that to, it ended up costing him a good bit of labor for me to undo that mess)!


6

After reading @woodchips answer and throwing in my $0.02 offhand, I did a bit of research. I found this article on the use (or non-use) of graphite on aircraft. The article mentions that metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, and cadmium may experience galvanic corrosion when exposed to graphite lubricant. Since galvanic corrosion requires an electrolyte, ...


6

You'll want to use a dry silicone lubricant like this. Or a graphite lubricant like this. The liquid part of these lubricants evaporates quickly, leaving behind a protective coating that will keep the lock functioning properly for quite some time. You don't want to use a lubricant like WD-40, because it will not evaporate completely and will collect ...


6

You can remove the oil film with a rag or paper towel soaked in some organic solvent like isopropyl alcohol. Don't these windows have any stop so they can be left ajar without blowing open? It might be good to install something like that instead. A long hook and eyelet would be the simplest.


5

Vegetable oil will gum up, attract dirt and dust, and eventually end up a huge mess. DO NOT use it. Mineral oil is a food-safe oil not normally used as a cooking lubricant, but it is the go-to for replenishing woods and lubricating mechanical parts of cooking utensils. It won't gum up, and is OK to use in a pinch. Most machine oils are a bit thin; they'll ...


4

Brake Fluid is not a lubricant, but a glycol based hydraulic fluid designed to have a high boiling point and to absorb water to prevent corrosion (why the brake system should be completely bled out every so often). Power Steering fluid and Transmission fluid are petroleum based hydraulic fluids, more useful for their ability to transmit pressure, resist ...


4

The drill you display is for DIY use (as opposed to professional use), so it's designed to be durable enough for years of typical DIY usage. So it has no user-serviceable parts - even its brushes will last for about one hundred hours of motor running and you're not expected to think of what happens to them after that one hundred hours. That's why you really ...


4

This page on YaleDoor.co.uk http://www.yaledoor.co.uk/blog/post/2012/05/01/Home-Door-Lock-Maintenance-Tips.aspx Says the opposite ... "Any, “all purpose” oil or lubrication will do the job, but be sure never to lubricate your door locks with powder graphite, as it will do more harm than good. Simply insert the straw (which is normally supplied with ...


4

Motor cycle chain lubricant or a 3-in-one oil works well. Motorcycle chain lubricant is designed to penetrate and provide lasting protection, though as with any lubricant, it does need to be re-applied occasionally. Lithium grease is a better option for sure, I just am putting this out there because it can be applied without taking the hinges apart, and ...


3

Genie makes a lubricant specifically designed for their screw drive openers. I used it at my old house and it seemed to work fairly well. You can buy it any major home centers. I believe they came in packs of 3 tubes and each tube was designed for one lubrication. I lubricated mine about every 6 months.


2

As others have said, WD-40 is not a "permanent" lubricant, but the spray can is damn convenient. So, what I would use is Spray silicone. You can find it in white and clear varieties. You probably want clear. (Spray silicone is what my car manufacturer reccomends for lubricating the door hinges.) My next choice would be 3-in-1 oil. It is a little more ...


2

Graphite is very soft and shouldn't cause any excessive metal on metal wear. It is a very effective dry-film lubricant, just a little messy to work with. I've used graphite to lubricate all the lock cylinders in my cars, house, etc for years. I recently thought the entry door lock on my motorhome was failing (locking the door with a key from outside ...


2

Another option is powdered graphite, available at any home store in a little tube for about 2 bucks - a tiny bit squirted into the roller/axle area, if that is where the squeak is coming from. This works great for door hinges as well, and does not have the disadvantages of spray oils like WD40 (sticky, wears away quickly, etc).


2

For the same reason you wouldn't use it on door hinges, it should never be used for chair and sofa mechanisms. Because WD-40 attracts dust and turns things black, over time that dirt accumulation within the moving parts will build up and eventually start to fall off onto carpeting creating a terrible black mess that is nearly impossible to remove.


2

Wikipedia mentions nothing of what you are worried about, and I have never heard of it having an issue staining or dissolving anything. I've used it on many things including plastics, and never personally had any issue. I know it is used on the plastic moving parts inside things like VCRs and DVD players, and I know it is used on many different types of ...


1

If it's entirely a mechanical valve, then use food-safe silicone grease. If it still sticks, you can just replace it. If it's an electrical switch that opens a solenoid on a water valve, then you should just replace the switch. I've had really good luck getting replacement parts and advice from http://www.repairclinic.com


1

It should be noted, different oils have different rates they break down, viscosity, weight, etc... different kinds of oil's exist for different needs. I've never heard of using silicone on a hinge; wd40 has always been my go to. will look into that. Vegetable oil would probably decay over time and begin to smell; stain the trim surround. In cooking, ...


1

Any electric motor, even if the rotor is stuck from filthy dried-up lubricant! Think squeaky furnace blower motors, fans that won't start up, lawn mower engines, etc. The solvent not only removes any remaining lube, but it can melt coil wires (the lightly-coated copper wires twisted up in electric motors) and cause an electrical short. New fan motor! $200! ...


1

Use a grease or a grease-like spray. I'm a big fan of white lithium grease. It comes in tubes and spray form. If you use a lube like the Genie brand, read the label or get the MSDS for it. Odds are good that its the same thing as more generic product and you can save some money buying off brand.



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