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2

There are certainly mortise-form-factor smart locks; I installed one of them last year. They tend to be commercial-grade rather than home-grade; more durable and able to handle more complex programming but also more expensive. At one point several manufacturers were offering smart mortise cylinders, which did a digital handshake with a powered key to make ...


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The secret to buying locks Every lock-set in a retail package has code numbers like "14165". This indicates the key pattern it uses. Generally they are packaged in boxes of 4-8 units, and every lock-set will have the same key code. This is good and bad. Good news: If you want your doors keyed alike, find a package that includes every type of lock you'...


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If you are concerned about security (e.g., the previous owner gave a key to a friend) you can rekey the lock rather than change it. Take the cylinder out of the door and go to a locksmith to have it rekeyed. This should be cheaper and easier than buying a new lock.


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Congratulations on becoming a home owner. You will soon learn to use lots of tools if you plan to do any DIY projects around the house. Most locksets only require a #2 Phillips screwdriver. You should not need any special or expensive tools. Just read the directions and follow them. Changing locks is very simple, usually just two screws that hold the inner ...


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So I eventually figured it out, after some trial and error. Many thanks to Jimmy Fix-It, for giving me the correct term of flush-bolt :) My actual problem I realised that the door itself had become slightly out of align, probably because people kept pushing the door and so after a while the top edge of the door, didn't line up with the flushing on the ...


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That is called a manual flush bolt. The piece that protrudes through the top and bottom of the door is called the bolt head. Both the bolt head (which is threaded to an actuating rod), and the actuating rod (which is threaded to the lever actuator) are designed to be adjusted by threading them in or out. The bolt head is commonly keyed, i.e. it is not round ...


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What happens when you try to use the correcy key? If it turns normally, the lock cylinder is fine and your kids are probably not culpable. Once unlocked, what happens when you turn the knob? If it starts to move but doesn't go all the way, this may just be wood expanding with humidity putting sideways pressure on the latch, and leaning on the door may ...


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In security the principle of weakest link applies. It's not possible to tell if the surface mounting alone will be the point of failure in your setup. The material of the door, the frame, hinges and the part which is most often overlooked: how well is the frame mounted to the wall pay equal role in providing security. There is nothing inherently wrong in ...


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From what little you have shown us, I'll fault it for inadequate attachment to door frame, and possibly to door. There are reasonably strong surface-mount ("rim") locksets. The Seagal-style vertical deadbolt design is something of a classical in that space; a non-junk lock, installed properly with hardened screws thru frame and into actual wall joists, can ...


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If by "unsafe" you meant that the catch can be overcome fairly easily with blunt force, then yes, this is unsafe. Nothing short of high-security hardware, properly installed, is "safe" in my book. If you're looking to keep out nuisance kids and lazy thieves, use that. If you're looking to defend against armed burglars or other human threats, don't trust it....


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I think it's a push latch or a push to close latch for sliding doors- like the one pictured below:



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