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One quibble with the other answers: These are indeed simple warded lever-tumbler locks. The keys for them are properly called "bit keys". Warded/lever locks don't have to be lower security than pin-tumbler locks (safe deposit boxes still use lever locks, for example) but making them both secure and affordable is harder than with pin-timbler locks. Skeleton ...


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For this type of lock you would need to call in a specialized locksmith who can do that for you. They would need to cut a skeleton key for you. There was only one time where I went into a hardwood store and found a skeleton key and was able to fit into my closet door and actually worked. But I believe it worked because it was just a regular keyway that any ...


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Even though it is a steel door you are able to expand the hole. You just need to the right tools to do so. I would use a different lock besides Schlage if you want something more secure then I would good with Medeco. I would use a power saw, you can get them at Home Depot, or any hardwood store. In the power saw department, they should have attachments for ...


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Number of pins and turns of the tumbler. Some tumblers can turn twice. I'm not sure how they work exactly but I'm assured that they are more difficult to pick. In any case, most burglars who find the front door locked will enter in via a window as they are often easier to open.


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If you have burglers that know how (or care to know how) to pick door locks, you definitely live somewhere a lot richer than me. To a lock picker, all Yale-type pin and tumbler locks are more or less the same in terms of difficulty. You can teach an 8-year-old to reliably pick a Yale lock in about half-an-hour.


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There would be basically no difference in overall entry door security with the original type deadbolt cylinder or a good quality modern one made out of similar materials. The "rarity" of key blanks would have little bearing because expert crooks that want to pick the lock use tools that are agnostic to the shape of the lock cylinder slot. Keep in mind ...


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I took the whole mechanism off to make it easy to work on the bench , took it apart to take out the lock with the broken key and fitted the new one i bought from Ebay ,GDS had the lock delivered in 48 hours with 2 keys £6 .00 i think . 10 minutes job done ..


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For locks, you have ANSI grades 3-1. 3 being the weakest and 1 being the strongest. Typically, if you buy them as a set both lock cylinders will have the same grade. But the cylinder is only one part of the security. A higher grade cylinder will resist picking and drilling but have no bearing on resisting blunt force to the door. Blunt force is ...


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I know this is late, but the question still sees activity. If the key were brass and you have a fine tip soldering iron, you could solder more brass to the broken key and pull it out after cooling.


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it is really simple to take out the key out of the lock. Once it breaks in the lock. I would first try to put some oil in the locks to have it loosen up. Then I would either take one of the tools provided in the comment before and try pulling it out. If not and if your onn side out of your door you can unscrew the lock off. once that is done you can pull the ...



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