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1

It turns out electronic locks (and door passage sets—a.k.a. door handle sets) have a limited range of door thicknesses they install in. A condo I used to live in had a mondo solid wood entry door 2.5 inches thick (exterior doors are normally 1.75 inches thick). To obtain a suitable electronic lock required a special order, 8 weeks, and $750. It was ...


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Installation instructions depend on the exact model of "electronic door lock" you purchase. Most of the low-cost/self-contained units install into a standard cylindrical-lock bore (ie, in place of the normal knobset and/or deadbolt), occasionally with another hole or two to anchor them firmly in place. That's an easy retrofit. Commercial-type units, where ...


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I don't know the details of that system, but that certainly is not "how they all work". The box outside should only be an intercom in the one you've shown us. If there was a keypad to unlock the door, that would only send key-press signals rather than connecting directly to the latch. The wire which operates the latch should NOT be exposed. Either you're ...


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If I am inferring correctly what you are describing, it sounds like the "brains" of the system are installed outside with one screw access. That, of course, is an abysmal design. The only thing that should be outside accessible would be the wires to the call button and speaker - all other wiring should be inside-access only. If you are otherwise happy with ...


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The system to which the question links lists this "Flush Mortice Lock Release 12v AC/DC - Fail Secure" under the heading *Related Items You May Need". If the lock is in a locked state, it remains locked upon interruption of power just as one would respect of a competently designed system component.



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