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18

We were all young once. You need a Torx screwdriver of the appropriate size https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torx Actually due to the pin in the middle it is more technically security Torx. Harbour Freight will get you out of trouble cheaply.


16

OLD ANSWER (Improved below) Graphite powder is the preferred lubricant for locks. You should be able to get it at any hardware store in a squeeze bottle that is half air, allowing you to blow it right into the keyway. You are going to have to wait a while before putting it on, as the residual WD-40 will gum it up. EDIT: As per MrSquonk's ...


12

The lock in the knob can be set to be locked when the door is closed. In other words, you do not have to do anything extra to lock the door, just pull it closed. This can be good or bad depending on how you look at it (it can be easy to lock yourself out this way). The dead bolt on the other hand always requires an extra step to lock the door (put the key ...


10

The problem here of course is that snow/freezing rain gets into the lock and freezes. With a house, this isn't normally a problem for a few reasons. First, you use it often enough that it doesn't get that bad, and second the inside of the house is warm, which prevents water from freezing inside the lock (unless it gets really, really cold I suppose). You ...


10

Good info here: http://www.lockwiki.com/index.php/Schlage_SecureKey


10

Installation instructions depend on the exact model of "electronic door lock" you purchase. Most of the low-cost/self-contained units install into a standard cylindrical-lock bore (ie, in place of the normal knobset and/or deadbolt), occasionally with another hole or two to anchor them firmly in place. That's an easy retrofit. Commercial-type units, where ...


9

Remove the pins from the hinges. You should then be able to pivot the door out of the opening. Once the door is removed you can remove the screws that hold in the strike bolt.


8

It's called a tarnish or patina and is caused by oxidation of the copper in the bronze. The sun's heat will accelerate that reaction somewhat compared to one in a cooler place. If you don't like it, simply clean the lockset with Brasso when it starts to look discolored. It will take some elbow grease the first time because the tarnish has had time to ...


7

As for expanding the hole, I am still confident this post will answer your question. Regarding the Schlage deadbolts, these are not great deadbolts. If you really want high security, you need to look at Mult-T-Lock or Medeco. These are far more secure for a number of reasons. First, they are made of much harder metals - if you feel them compared to ...


7

I agree with Jeff and Mike's answers, but you also have to make sure the lock was installed correctly. When I bought my house and changed the locks, I found out that the strike plates installed (deadbolt and doorknob) on the front door were only screwed into the trim with 1/4" screws. It wouldn't have taken much force at all to rip them right out. (My guess ...


7

You may have a deadlocking latch bolt, which in addition to a normal door latch has a plunger. When this plunger is retracted (which happens when the door is closed), the spring loaded mechanism on the latch is disabled. This prevents someone from using the credit card trick to open the door from the outside, so the only way to open the door is by unlocking ...


7

Looks like they had a "jimmy-proof deadbolt" on the door. You should be able to pickup one at any major hardware store.


7

You can try a different search phrase as "Thumb Turn Security Latch". There is a seller on eBay that has new stock available in range of finishes. Here is a picture of the offering. Considering the price you may just want to consider purchasing new units instead of trying to locate parts for the old ones that are broken. The trade name for these seems ...


6

You say you'll be removing the old lock, so why not replace the mortise locks and if you buy 5 or 7 lever ones they'll be more secure than the bored cylindrical lock. Make sure you buy one with the handle spindle in the same position as the old lock. When it comes to the door jamb, a lot of mortise locks have a "box keep" rather than just a plate defining ...


6

Another option is to take the lock to a locksmith and have it re-keyed to a new key (and get a bunch of copies of that key). I have heard that this can cost less than the cost of a new doorknob. However, as this would involve removing the knob and taking it the locksmith, I would probably just get a new knob and replace it (unless you really like the ...


6

First, unlock the door. Now place a piece of tape across the small knob you use to lock/unlock the door so that it doesn't move. Next, take off the handle and glue the knob in place so that it cannot be operated. Re-install the handle.


6

For locks that are in such bad shape that one is unable to get graphite powder in it, you can first use a little bit of LPS 1 (Greaseless lubricant). Do not use any kind of silicone lube, that's FAR worse than WD-40 (I had a guy come in with a couple locks he'd done that to, it ended up costing him a good bit of labor for me to undo that mess)!


6

take the lock to your local home store that carries this line of locks. they will remove the core and put it in a SmartKey Reset Cradle. this returns the lock to an unprogrammed state. there is no way to do this yourself without disassembling the lock core, and there's about a bazillion point 2 pieces in there.


6

Before the key gets stuck, use graphite to lubricate the lock. When the key gets stuck, there's nothing preventing you from using the other side of a lock (it's not the same keyhole). If you can't gently unstick the key (forcefully removing a key may bend the pins in the lock, rendering it useless), then it's probably easiest to replace the entire lock. ...


6

Get some lock deicer/lubricant. It's sold specifically for this and contains graphite and methanol. Shake well before applying. The methanol removes water and oil from the lock mechanism and leaves behind graphite well flooded through every nook and cranny in the device. You use graphite because it's a dry lubricant and unlike oil, it doesn't attract dirt or ...


6

Make a bow drill: Get a block of wood big enough to hold in your hand. Scrape out small hole in the wood. The non-pointy end of the drill bit goes in that hole. This is called the "hand hold". You're going to use this wood block to push the drill bit against the door. Make a bow with some strong wood and strong string. Wrap the string around the drill ...


6

The big disadvantage is having to keep two keys with you instead of just one. If you lose your keys (or someone steals them) both keys are compromised so there's not an advantage to having two different keys in that case. The only advantage I can see is if you frequently need to let other people into your house. You could hide the door knob key or give it ...


5

It sounds to me like something in the knob has worn out (eg, a metal locking mechanism has broken off or been worn down). If this is the case, there's not much chance that you'll be able to [easily] fix it. If it was me, I'd just replace the knob. You may also be able to swap it with another knob in a location where you don't need a working lock.


5

You could fit a slide bolt on the frame of the door, and then attach a secondary pull string (or keep a separate pole and hook) to operate the bolt.


5

If you are not opposed to replacing the ladder, they do make attic ladders with integrated locks (i.e. Fakro Insulated Wood Attic Stair Ladder. It looks like you need a special "handle" mounted on a 3 foot pole to lock and unlock the latch. I'm not sure if these locks can be accessed from the top, but it is at least worth looking at. If you prefer to ...


5

Glue could fail and/or look ugly. Other options cost money. When you remove the inside knob, you will see a connecting rod protruding from the latch mechanism that engages the lock button. Cut this off so it no longer engages the lock button. Do not cut the semi circular shaft that engages the main lever! Ensure the remaining stub is turned to the unlock ...


5

Yes, locks can be picked, or bump keys can be used. There's no difference in using these tools to unlock vs re-lock a lock.


5

If I understand correctly, it is probably just a pressure fit. You should be able to pry it so it comes straight out the edge of the door from where the cylinder sits. This picture is just of a normal doorknob, but same principle applies.


4

I completely agree that having more locks can be helpful but also keep in mind that the brand and model also play an important part. AFAIK, some locks (including deadbolts) are still susceptible to bump-key techniques. Sometimes you really do get what you pay for. ;-) -M


4

From a security point of view two locks is better than one. Some insurance companies might require that you have a deadbolt type lock, offering reduced premiums if you have a recognised standard one fitted.



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