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2

No this is not okay - especially for a new house. If the builder is saying it is okay, run away from this house because you have no idea what else they have screwed up. You can't put a post on a slab if it is structural (i.e. not decorative). A concrete slab is not designed (and shouldn't be) to handle structural loads like this. The concrete looks fine. ...


0

Run away and do not look back. Anyone showing a new home with a flaw such as this is waiting to sell someone a "bridge". This is a text book scenario of Buyer Beware


3

One thing that I have learned in my short life, is that when you are buying a house, always put in clauses so you can get out/get money removed from the asking price if something like this is found to be wrong. With a home inspectors and an engineers opinions, you may be able to get a sizable portion of the price of the house knocked off. Not an expert ...


1

I'd like to add another vote for "this looks bad". To proceed with buying the house, get a written report from an engineer and they use that to get it fixed, or get an allowance at closing to get it fixed. Are there other support poles that the same thing could happen to?


0

You don't give very much information, but just looking at the photo the "foundation" looks like crap. It looks like it is way too thin and the concrete is cheap. Of course, that is the construction style in America now, build crap houses out of crap plywood on crap "slabs" 2-inches thick then wire the whole thing with crap Romex and plumb it with crap PEX ...


4

This may be a problem or non-problem depending on the foundation construction. You'll be much better off consulting an expert who knows how foundations are built in your area and how to diagnose them. One option is that the foundation is designed with separate large thick concrete pads that bear the load and then the space between them is filled with ...


8

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


32

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


5

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


17

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


0

Nogging in the UK. These do the same job as herringbone bracing in between floor joists i.e. they stiffen up the wall and also stop the studs twisting (in theory). They are commonly placed as in the picture but also either side of the marked line. Staggering then thus makes for easier nailing (straight instead of skewed). If I remove a nogging I'd try to ...


0

@Ecnerwal's answer is very correct... contact an engineer. In my case I contacted someone from the local government (permit office), and they were able to run the numbers for me. In my particular case, I am using (2) 9¼" x 1¾" Mircolams. What went into the calculation was the number of floors this wall is supporting and the length of the rafters over top.


6

The blocks are known as Dwangs or Nogs here, and was confused about what blocks you were asking about. But they are used for stiffening the wall and attaching drywall, as well as mounting points for basins etc. Not heard of them being used for firestopping, and does not make a lot of sense to me. Recommendation from BRANZ (local building regulation ...


6

Typical of firestopping, so that (when sheeted with drywall) flames cannot run the full height of the wall inside the stud bay. It would be better to move (up or down a few inches), rather than remove the blocking, for that reason. While it may be unfinished at present, the builders presumably intended that it be ready for drywall if/when you or some other ...


9

Can't say for sure why they did it in your situation, without knowing a bit more details. Typically blocking is installed to prevent framing members from twisting or warping, and to stiffen and add strength to the wall. Though it's also common to install blocking, where fire stops are required by code. Blocking can also provide an attachment point for ...



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