Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

If this is a load-bearing wall you'll want to frame the pet door in, just like you would a window. This will allow you to properly carry the load down, and around the pet door. The king studs should go all the way from the top plate, down to the bottom plate. The header will be made up of 1/2" plywood/OSB, sandwiched between two 2x4s. If you don't want ...


12

It is not safe to simply cut a hole in the studs, and while the safe probably would transfer the load, you do not know that the safe was designed to transfer vertical loads, or how it will react. The consequences of a mistake here could be severe long term. Therefore the proper course of action is to reframe the wall. Generally you would do this by adding ...


10

3 for two reasons: Your walls are not meant for dynamic, changing loads such as those caused by swingset motions, so you don't know the potential damage long term; and I would hesitate very much to buy a house which had a physical connection to another person's house via a toy.


6

The Uni Knot is a slip knot that is adjustable. The Hangman's Noose is not typically considered adjustable. The Hangman's Noose when the loop is under load is pulling on the top of the knot as well as conventionally on the bottom of the knot which is truly tightening the knot. They are typically only used with thicker ropes because otherwise you run a risk ...


6

OK normally load bearing walls will have 2 plates on top. But having 2 plates means nothing. People frame however they learned to or want. Checking door header also means nothing. Some people flip all door headers - doesn't make the wall load bearing. You can never get into the head of the guy who framed your house. I worked for a construction ...


6

Look where the joists meet the ridge beam where you're going to put the door. Get some dimensional lumber about 4 feet long, at least as thick as the existing beam. Nailing a couple of 2x6's together would probably suffice in the short term. Give yourself enough room to work, and using a jack post and this 4 foot beam segment, support the joists in the ...


6

I really don't know where to start on this question. There are several steps that need to be done, and soon before any serious damage is done. First, you need to stabilize the situation. Several joists must be supported at once via a temp bridge support ( 2, 2X8's upright, spanning several joists) held up by your temp house jack, but two would be better. ...


5

My vote is for option 3. I've never seen angled pipe flanges either, but you could make a couple for this purpose out of 1-ft lengths of pressure-treated 2x6 with a pipe-sized 45-degree hole drilled in each. Then anchor those to the walls vertically. That would give you the added advantage of spreading your anchors out a bit in the cinderblock, rather ...


5

Chris's advice to put a temp brace under a few joists is exactly right. Practically speaking, the 20 foot wall probably has a double 2X4 top plate and you will need to remove two studs to frame for your new 32 or 36 inch door. It is very unlikely that you will see any deflection of these 2X4's when you remove just two studs. Regardless, it is easy to put in ...


3

I'd say it's almost certainly load bearing for one simple reason. You've got what appears to be a beam running over the opening from the dining room to the hallway, and you don't have one going into the kitchen. The fact that your dining/hall opening isn't floor to ceiling suggests strongly that the beam is running across that opening, which means it's ...


3

Given the direction of the joists in the basement, the location of the wall in the floor plan, the offset of the wall below, and the gap between the adjacent wall in some of your photos, it's likely that this wall is not load bearing. To be certain, I'd look at the the floor/attic above to see if there are joists resting on top of this wall. Some of the ...


3

The total weight of materials in a room is not really the question. The concern, if any is how many pounds per square foot. This will vary depending on what size joists are supporting the floor. Common residential construction is build to handle a dead load (materials/fixtures) of 40 to 60 psf averaged over the entire floor not counting load bearing wall ...


3

The counterop weighs less than 300 lbs. The cabinets probably weigh less than 100 lbs. This is about 400lbs spread over a floor area of almost fifteen square feet. this is less than 30 lbs per square foot. An adult standing still is about 150 lbs on one square foot. You should have no problem with the load regardless of the placement with regard to the ...


2

This is quickly going to become too complicated to tell you for sure if your deck will be able to support a structure like a pergola, but if it is even half the weight of your typical hot tub then your deck will very likely not support it. To accurately determine this you need to figure out the additional #'s/sq ft of load that a structure as large as a ...


2

Without looking at blueprints, all you can do is make an educated guess. Possible methods include: If it's an exterior wall, it's almost always load bearing. If the joists are not continuous over the wall (they are cut short and meet on top of the wall) it is load bearing. If there is a load bearing wall or beam directly above or below this wall, it is ...


2

Typically the load on a floor is measured in pounds per square feet (psf). Where did you get the "20,000 lbs" figure you quote? Do you have a specific load in mind? Is this for general storage? Residential living space? The use of the space would dictate how much load the floor should be designed for. Typical values would be from 40 psf to 100 psf or more, ...


2

I am guessing that this is an exterior wall which means it is load bearing. You will probably have to put in a stud on each side of the dog door and carry the load of the stud you are cutting to the outer two studs... So then you will generally have to rip out a small section of drywall and do a little work - frame like installing a window. This is ...


1

I had to read your question a few times, but I still don't know how you intend on reinforcing the walls with rebar. You cannot simply put rebar against the existing walls and cover them with some mortar. For rebar to be effective, it must be embedded in the proper thickness and rating of concrete for the load. the concrete supports the weight and the ...


1

Probably not load bearing. Looks like roof load is on closet back wall (is that an exterior wall)? To be doubly sure, I always go to attic and look to see if there's any roof trussing sitting on top of the wall you're removing. Measure downstairs for landmarks (for reference points) when you're up there. Good luck, demo is FUN!


1

Each of the two temporary structures (one in each room) will need to mimic the section of wall that is being removed. So if the jack poles are resting on a single bottom-plate and are holding up a double top-plate, then jack poles 16" on center are called for. If something more substantial than the double top plate and single bottom plate are used, then ...


1

Remove trim. Remove door casing. Remove drywall around jack studs (2x4 closest to door opening on each side) and pretty much all the way up to the ceiling. Stop if you have roofing structure above your door - keep going if you don't. Pull out jack studs (you could just extend them with a piece of 2x4 on non load bearing walls) Push up header to ...


1

In general, load bearing walls are placed above and parallel to (with as little offset as possible) the beams below them. I would span another beam or mini beam parallel to the first one, to support the joists mid span. I would start out with screw jacks (raising a new beam) and some form of force plate over your slab (steel over plywood to support and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible