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11

Do they still make Linoleum? lol. Today there are many types of sheet flooring goods. the most common is vinyl sheet flooring. The newest style which is gaining popularity very quickly is fiberglass sheet flooring. This fiberglass flooring is very different than vinyl. If has a padded backing and is set with removable adhesive or with no adhesive at all. ...


11

If the tile is nice tile, I'd strongly consider keeping that. People like tiled kitchens. Linoleum is a bit like laminate counter tops. Has a bit of a 60s/70s stigma to it. But also like laminate counter tops, they've gotten better and now come in a much wider range of looks. Linoleum has the added benefit of being a 'natural/green' material, so fits ...


10

There is a whole new generation of fiberglass, not vinyl, flooring that is self laying. The various manufacturers say wit will lay flat, not curl or bubble without adhesive. I have my doubts, but admit I have not used it without adhesive. The manufacturer does says that when adhesive is used, it can only be "Releasable Pressure Sensitive Adhesive", never ...


10

I don't see any nail-heads or screw-heads in the carpet edge trim, so you probably have one like this: You might be able to save it, but they're cheap so I'd just replace it with a new one. Pry it up taking care not to damage the door trim. The carpet in the door opening should be loose enough that you can get access to the linoleum underneath (there ...


7

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


7

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


6

As Tester101 said, what's usually called "linoleum" nowadays is actually made of vinyl, and falls under the general heading of "sheet flooring". On the upside, lino's cheap, easy to install and easy to care for. You don't have to seal it like you do porous tile, grout and/or hardwood (but a shot of acrylic floor polish never hurt anything). It does have a ...


5

Unfortunately, you NEED to remove or cover the old vinyl. If you attempt to tile over an unsecure base, you are wasting yout time and money because the tile will not stay down. In your case, if you go over the splitting vinyl, the vinyl will continue to separate and up will come the tiles. If you go over the paper layer, the mortar/quickset will not stick ...


5

I've never heard or seen this myself. If it wasn't glued or rolled correctly in the first place, it's not going to glue itself back down, especially not at the seams. Call the installer back and make them do it right - rip it up and install new. Don't let them try and "fix" it.


5

Extended Spade Bit.


5

Instead of trying to work with the flooring in a cramped space, I use a roll of craft paper and sticky tape to make a template of the room. Start in the center of the room, lightly stick a strip to the ground, and cut it at the edges of the room. You get a cleaner edge by going a little past the edge, then folding the cut edge back and sticking it down ...


4

Here is an article (How to Make a Temporary Dance Floor) on how to make a dance floor from Medium-density fiberboard (MDF) and some old scrap carpeting. Home Depot also sells carpeting by the roll and it is pretty inexpensive (then you could get just the right size fit for the MDF boards and also the area of your dance floor). Purchase MDF and scrap ...


4

Would a bamboo rug work? It'd be easy to roll up when not in use. I don't know if it's a great dancing surface, though.


4

Maybe a hole saw? I'd say it's worth a shot if you have one - or cheap ones are around $5-10. Otherwise, you could always try cutting with a utility knife until you're past the linoleum. Then drill after you've peeled it back. I doesn't have to be pretty if it's going to be beneath carpet.


4

Either way will work. My first impression would be to try to remove the old lino, especially since there is so little of it. If it turns out it too difficult, then simply remove all the loose lino, lay down your foam underlayment and go right over the whole mess. Good luck.


3

You could use an aluminum transition strip from the vinyl to the tile. Some types of transition strips are really intended to be installed under the higher tile layer so this may limit your ability to hide fasteners that secure the strip in place. Here are some examples: ... You can normally find an assortment of different styles of aluminum transition ...


2

As others have said, you want flat (aka "true") more than level. If you have areas in your floor that are uneven, but you do not wish to add an entire new layer (which I generally think is a bad idea cause you end up with floors 2" thick with 9 layers of junk in them...) then you can find a floor leveling compound which you spread into the low points to ...


2

You should be able to remove the carpet and padding without disturbing the tile. Then you can install a floating laminate wood floor without any concern. A hardwood floor that requires nailing would be a bigger concern.


2

First off that appears to be cheap PVC (Vinyl) sheet, not linoleum (linoleum is a natural product made from flax seed). And the term 'grout' may set someone on the wrong path helping you. Your faceless home store will have a variety of vinyl sheet goods glues and seam sealers for this purpose. The seam sealer is probably the best bet as it comes in the ...


1

Asbestos tiles can be dangerous but only if they crumble and the asbestos becomes airborne. I'd suggest trying to remove one tile and see how it goes. The process I've used: spray area with water from a mister (keeps dust down) get a tile remover (essentially a large, flat blade on a handle that you can use to pry up the tile) at a low angle, thrust the ...


1

That's exactly what my parents (or rather their contractors) did to their kitchen when a chair leg started scratching up the lino badly enough to show the concrete underneath. The contractors simply cut away as much as they could of the torn part so it was as flat as possible, then added a later of Tyvek (cause the lino WAS right on the slab) and then the ...


1

If the floor looked flat before with the old linoleum them I wouldn't mess with it. I used floor leveler under linoleum once and it was a nightmare. The leveler is expensive: I spent more on it than the flooring. It didn't dry smooth and after it dried little concrete nuggets kept appearing from no where no matter how much I swept. I kept pulling chunks out ...



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