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2

The noise is coming from the ballast (the part which converts 120 or 240 (or whatever the local standard is) VAC to the voltage and current required for the fluorescent bulb. Given that the fixture no longer works with a new bulb, that has failed, but some portion of it is still trying to work and the high-speed electrical switching common in newer-style ...


1

The simplest solution would be to disconnect the electrical connection within in the light fitting. If the fitting in question is not the last fitting in the "chain", you might need to keep the incoming and outgoing switched connections joined to pass the power on to the next fitting. Usual disclaimer - only do this if you know what you're doing and switch ...


2

Sliding contact, bathroom, expect failure. Using a ribbon cable in the manner of a cable carrier (should not actually need a cable carrier, though if you wanted to go there you could get a small one) would be far more reliable. Fixed contacts, cable moves. Seen on many inkejet printer printheads (the "doing it with a ribbon cable method", that is.) The real ...


1

The problem with the light in the new fan/light combo is almost certainly an intermittent connection in the fan unit. Often these units come with two sets of wires (one for light and one for fan) that you join together at the fixture for operation from a single switch. Your first point of investigation will be to lower the fixture and check that the ...


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This is assumes we're talking a screw in bulb socket like a medium base A26. You can adapt the below for other socket types. The first thing to do is test the socket itself. Best way to do this is to use a multi-meter set to AC and an appropriate voltage setting for your supply voltage. Using the test leads, touch the bottom pin and the metal of the base ...


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One problem with this approach is that LEDs are not incandescent bulbs. LEDs (stripped of the on-board driver circuit which normally handles that part) are "current mode" devices - that is, an LED driver closely controls the current through the LED, and the voltage may vary. When driving multiple LEDs, they either need to be in series and driven off a ...


0

The lamps will draw more than their labeling since there are losses converting AC to DC for the LED's. The previous poster's math is off but he is correct that the lower voltage means more losses over long distances. 200 watts would seem sufficient to run 10 - 14w lamps with added losses for rectification. I suspect the drivers are going bad from heat ...


2

You can want whatever you want to want, but that won't make it practical or efficient or cost-efficent (which comes back to practical.) There are at least 2 things that might be called a "solar tube" that come immediately to mind, and they are quite dissimilar. One is an "evacuated tube solar collector" and other other is a tubular skylight. I rather ...


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I've repaired 3 of my LED lights that were blinking by replacing both electrolytic capacitors. Capacitance was OK, but the capacitor resistance (ESR) was too high on both of them


2

If you've modified any wiring recently, you may have accidentally connected two separate circuits. Otherwise, the only thing I can think of that could cause this is a short-circuit. Either case is (very) potentially dangerous. If you don't feel comfortable tracking down electrical issues yourself, I would call a licensed electrician right away.


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First I would go with warm white lights not the cool white, I think it makes a softer look to the bedroom. In terms of the switching, yes a push button switch would work fine, you just have to make sure that the switch is within spec for the lights used. I have rather opted for a dimmable solution with my childrens beds. since they like to have some light ...


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To go around the top of the frames on each bunk so they have their own lighting. I'm guessing 5m is about the most you can power from a single 12v adapter in series, but what about in parallel? Limited only by the amperage of the 12V power adapter. Next question... is it possible to use a switch such as this: It is rated for 12V @ 3A. If the LEDs ...


1

There are LED retrofit tubes that do not require ballast removal. Here is an example: http://www.ledsmagazine.com/articles/iif/2013/12/philips-delivers-led-based-t8-tubes-that-work-with-existing-ballasts.html If you installed an LED tube that requires ballast removal into a fixture with the ballast still wired in you almost certainly did kill the LED tube. ...


1

The packaging of your LED tube should specifically state whether or not it is supposed to use a ballast. If you connected a no-ballast tube to a ballasted socket, yes, it is possible that you fried the circuits. See also the answer to http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/95491/is-it-more-energy-efficient-to-remove-the-ballast-by-using-led-tube


0

If you can add a wire then you can connect the final switched live back to the first switch for a total of 3 travelers, then you can connect the 3-ways like so: (source wikipedia) If terminal A is hot then the lamp is on. And on the other side terminal B is always hot and ready to power an indicator light.


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Using a Z-Wave, Insteon or similar type of "smart" switch would be the simplest way, as just requires replacing the two existing switches. Expect $50-70 per switch. The is the closet thing I'm aware of that's an off-the-shelf solution to your problem. You could also run a new wire between the two switches, to provide a switched return line that could ...


0

How about binder clips and small individual magnets? Or, you can just use the binder clips to the edge of the roof.


3

These would be the equivalent of an R20 flood lamp: R20 is simply a lamp size and style designation. R for reflector lamp. 20 for 20 eights of an inch, or 20/8", or 2.5" in diameter. Just know, standard "A-lamps" will fit similarly to R20 lamps. It's just R lamps are reflector and will concentrate the light basically in one direction, while A lamps glow ...


3

The metal tab in the base of the outlet has been pushed down too far (usually by overtightenig a bulb), and no longer makes good contact with the bulb. This causes sparking that gets worse as it gradually burns away the solder blob, and increases wear on the bulb. You can tell this is happening be examining the base of the failed bulb; there will be a large ...


1

Because IC housing are designed to be in direct contact with insulation they run hotter because the heat from the bulb cannot dissipate as quickly as a non-IC housing which will dissipate heat into the space above the fixture. Installing are vapor proof trim not approved for an IC housing, in an IC housing normally results in the plastic around the glass ...


1

These all work a little different but basically you have your outlet with the two mounting screws sticking out, the plate, and the light. The plate needs to be secured by the two mounting screws which seems to be the issue right now. It might slide in from a certain angle or the screws might have a nut (each) that came off on the other side. It looks like ...


9

1 - TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, preferably from the breaker, not just the switch. Those two screws you see protruding from the box are there to hold up the light fixture. Extend these screws to their full length so that they are in the electrical box, but are as long as they can get. Remove the glass and possibly the lightbulbs from the fixture. You ...


0

My wife bought a good quality ceiling light with 12 individual lights. I bought a trailing edge dimmer, but I found that the lights started to flicker after about 20 minutes. I carried out various fault finding with no success. I eventually contacted THORN who made the dimmer switch and they told me that it was probably a design issue and that they would ...


0

Simple rectifier is 4 diodes one from each AC line to the positive input of the LED and two from the negative output of the LED to each of the AC lines. (4) 1N4007 diodes will do just fine for this. Just wire two up together on one end and the other two the opposite way like and in and out Y and attach to each end of the diode(s) the other ends mate up ...


0

pull the third wire (same gauge) through the same conduit from the fan to the switch. It possible that the conduit isn't large enough for another wire and you'll need to upgrade it. Use either red or black but make sure you can distinguish the 2 lives (like if you end up with 2 blacks you label that wire at both ends). You then either need a second switch ...


0

You would appear to have the lights connected to BOTH the dimmer and the fan switch. Presumably this means that things are not really wired the way they were before. You'll need to figure out where this happened and correct it; it's difficult to speculate from afar, but when you get beyond what you can sort out yourself, call in a pro.


1

Most should be labelled on the packaging, or on the light string itself, with how much current can be plugged into the socket at the far end of the string. As long as you don't exceed that, you should be fine. (A sequence of a 2A string plugged into a 5A string plugged into a 4A string draws 11A total, and you can't plug that into another string unless (a) ...


1

If they are set up with a plug at one end and a socket at the other, should be fine - though I'd certainly suggest plugging the 2A string into the 5A string, rather than the other way around.


0

1 white which is hot, and 2 greys which are hot...the switch is on 2 seperate breakers. This means that: new switch it only has 1 common hook up, then 3 other connectors on the otherside. The new switch will NOT work here. You cannot feed from "2 separate breakers" to "1 common hookup" - you need a different switch that more closely matches the ...


2

"Ultimately, my question is, shouldn't all switches and outlets have a dedicated line back to the breaker box?" By modern wiring code, yes, there should be a neutral in the switch box. In older houses, that was not always the case; sometimes only the hot ran through the switchbox (especially when it was wired as a "switch loop").


2

If the switch has screw terminals as opposed to wire leads you DO have to pig-tail a piece of wire to the splice and then connect that tail to the switch. DO NOT place more than one wire under a binding screw terminal, unless of course it is designed for it. Even in that case it would only be designed for up to two wires. Do you have a model number for this ...


1

First, you need to ensure there is a neutral in the switch location (A requirement of NEC 2011 section 404.2 C, assuming that applies to you) -- the easiest way to do this is to run a 14/2 NM cable (standard house wire, aka the brand name "Romex") from your power source to the switch first. Second, run a 14/3 wire from the switch to the fan. This has a ...


1

It says 2.1 amps/5 meters for the 30 LED/meter strip, 4.2 amps/5 meters for the 60 LED/meter strip. So, that's either a 5 amp @ 12V supply or a 10 amp @ 12V supply. I would not recommend hooking up the two strips in serial; the LEDs at the end of the second strip will likely be much dimmer than the ones at the beginning. You can get around this by running a ...


0

Your kind of looking at brands as there is no universal protocol. The cheapest is probably x-10 which uses a very unreliable signal thru the house wiring. Beyond that google around insteon vs. zigbee vs. z-wave vs. upb for a flavor of option$


2

I've seen every type of "home automation light switch" system, but they all require some sort of "hub" by a company. Some communicate wirelessly and others do not. They also have varying levels of security. If you are still against a hub, there is one more option you have: Solid state relays. You can wire them inline before all your lights, then put an ...


4

Have you adjusted the low-end trim? There is a PDF which they class as "advanced" instructions that describes the procedure on Page 25. Hold On button for 6 seconds, until LED (on dimmer) starts to flash. Hold Down button until lamp turns off or starts to flash. Tap Up button until lamp is not flashing and is stable (or is as bright as you want the lowest ...


0

Generally speaking you need a dimmer designed for led or cfl bulbs. These will allow you to adjust the upper and lower ranges in order to dim the bulb correctly. Ultimately incandescent bulbs are the best to dim since the light output is directly proportional to the voltage.


0

Usually you don't ground light fixtures that have nothing on them that is conductive that you can touch; example would be those plastic or ceramic rosebud fixtures (side note, I have no idea why I call them that). Most of the time they don't even have a ground terminal, so it's not even an option. I'd like to see the wiring but sight unseen my guesses are: ...


3

That wiring is AC cable, modern AC cable. I can clearly see the bonding strip that makes the sheathing a grounding conductor. So since a grounding means exists you must use it. With switches, simply screwing them to a grounded metallic box grounds them, as opposed to a receptacle which would need to be a self-grounding type. So technically, just installing ...


1

NEC says that you can replace a switch where no grounding conductor exists, though you'll have to use a nonconducting, noncombustible faceplate. For clarity, I'd leave the grounding conductor from the switch disconnected. That way if anybody comes along in the future, they won't be confused and think the enclosure is grounded. National Electrical Code ...


1

There should be no problems with extending the circuit as you suggest. Install another box where you need it, run the cable between the boxes, and hook everything up. I'd contact the local building department, and ask them if they would consider cable run on top of cabinets to be "subject to physical damage". I wouldn't think so, but not all jurisdictions ...


0

I have a house that has pretty high (12-13 foot) ceilings with recessed cans. I was using 120 Watt BR40 bulbs (the highest wattage allowed for the cans), and my electric bills were over the top. About 3 years ago, I switched to CFL's, and my bills went down significantly. Unfortunately, my wife did not like the CFL's (light color, long time to turn on, etc, ...


0

Update - I called Home Depot and a DC extension cord will not work with this system. He said there is no way to extend this product. This leaves me with installing a second outlet which I think is still my cheapest option since I already own extra 12/2 wire.


3

I don't think there are any real safety concerns - a lot of fancy light switches work this way, and many have the proper safety approvals, which they presumably wouldn't be able to get if it was dangerous. Mostly it's just an annoyance when you have lights that do light up with the tiny amount of power they allow through. If that bothers you, the only ...


1

The only reason not to connect the ground wire would be because there is nowhere to connect it. Older houses have 14/2 without a ground, particularly to ceiling boxes. The box itself may not be grounded. In this case, it would be better NOT to connect it to the box, as a signal to the next person working in there, "Warning! This is not grounded!" ...


0

You have it right. Remember that capacitors can store power for some time, so be careful when handling. I would recommend removing the ignitor, capacitor, and ballast to ensure some future user does not attempt to incorrectly re-wire the fixture. Remember, safety first: turn off and secure the power supply prior to servicing.



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