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0

Assuming this is the setup you have described: You will need to pull a new 12/3 cable to your new 3-way switch. You will also have to replace your existing switch with a 3-way switch. Your wiring setup will look like this: Because your lighting circuit's power is supplied by a conductor in a 12/3 cable, the figures above were modified as follows: ...


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It was a bad switch; it's all good now. It was the last thing I checked.


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1- You may have tied into a switch leg or neutral from another light. Is there something on a photo-cell or timer somewhere? 2- I have seen bad splices/ loose wiring act this way. As the light and heat of the day increases, the copper expands slightly and makes contact. 3- Crossed wiring. <---- most likely... Trace your steps and check all splices. Go ...


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Guesswork: in the absence of any timers on the premises, something is wired wrong and an exterior light with a photo sensor is completing a path. Diagnosing any problem usually begins at, ever since I...


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This is a matter of personal preference, however that being said you should avoid direct line of sight with the strip. For example, if you can see the LED strip while walking down stairs then it would be better to adjust the strip as to avoid this if possible as they are pretty intense on the eyes. An easy to make wooden lighting rail that basically ...


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Ceiling fan wiring? Here is a discussion with the same color wires. https://www.askmehelpdesk.com/advice/t-348809.html


2

Looks like it might be an EJ500 Astro In-Wall Timer, or similar device. Here's a link to the Installation Instructions (PDF). According to the instructions, the switch at the top of the device is an "air gap" switch. Which is "designed to turn power off for routine maintenance". You remove the battery holder "by prying left and right of the holder ...


1

Do you know what the part pointed to by the red arrow is for? I am not familiar with this unit but the indicated item seems like it could be a catch to allow the control panel unit to be removed from the wall mount. It is also possible that this could be a manual override switch although this seems more unlikely from looking at the pictures.


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Your sensor / switch device is designed to be mounted into an electrical box with permanent wiring. Your light fixture with its attached cord (with three prong plug) is meant to be connected into an outlet that is itself mounted in an electrical box with permanent wiring. The lamp itself, when configured this way could be considered a temporary connection ...


2

A compact florescent (CFL) definitely heats up and needs to have room to dissipate that heat. It is not nearly as hot (25–33%) as an equivalently bright incandescent, but the radiation pattern is different too. An incandescent has most of its heat coming out the bulb with only a small proportion from near the narrow base. A CFL has electronics in ...


2

Your light fixture has hot, neutral, and ground. The diagram actually shows the switched hot and neutral connecting to the light - ground is or should be obvious, it's not shown probably to reduce clutter. As shown on the diagram, you connect the neutral from the wires supplying the location of the sensor to the fixture wire. It does not connect to the ...


1

The primary consideration is not the static load, but the dynamic load from a heavy, rotating load. That's why there are electrical boxes specifically designed and designated by code for ceiling fan loads. See http://homerepair.about.com/od/electricalrepair/ss/elec_box_ltg.htm#step5


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I had this problem. My house is a bit older and I started replacing bulbs in the basement as they burnt out. I pulled out incandescent bulbs and replaced them with LED bulbs. The dimmer started buzzing and I though "eh, its an old switch its probably going bad." I started with the dimmer switch, replaced it, still had the problem, replaced it a second ...


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You have two issues: Strength of the hickey - Some hickeys are cast from cheap pot metal and would be sketchy. Some are steel but bent in the shape of a U with one open side, also problematic. Heavier cast iron ones with support on both sides wold probably be better. Strength of the crossbar - Also an issue. consider a heavier duty type or even a full ...


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OEM builder grade anything is not the best. replace with a heavy duty switch and use the things on the side called screws. builder grade is meant to have a life time that exceeds the home warrantee but cheap enough so they feel that their profit margin was boosted enough so they con focus on other corners to cut. I know I installed thousands of them as a ...


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Yes, you just have to buy the right dimmer. Here in the USA, most dimmers are compatible with 3-way circuits. I'm not sure if that's true in your area, so you'll have to verify when buying the dimmer. NOTE: In the USA we would call this type of circuit a 3-way, while other countries (yours included) refer to it as a 2-way circuit.


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If replacing the bulbs did not help you might have a short in the fixture. By pass switch and turn on the breaker will confirm. But likely either a bad socket or transformer because the wrong dimmer was used. It is possible with today's modern low volt lights for the lights to have a electronic transformer instead of the traditional magnetic type. ...


2

It appears from the 45606 manual that this model is not designed for use with anything but incandescent loads: This dimmer switch is designed for use only with permanently installed incandescent lighting fixtures. Do not use it to control fluorescent lighting, transformer supplied lighting/appliances, motorized appliances or receptacles. The ...


-1

Cut a potato in half and stick one end into the broken bulb and twist. Seriously works.


0

Provided the light-fitting is accessible, use rubber gloves. It works every time!


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I use a suction cup dent puller to grip the glass on computers and tablets when there's no handle: I doubt that glass is much different than the glass in the stuck bulbs, strength-wise.


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In my experience many times bulbs of this nature tend to, separate from the metal seating as you apply the pressure needed to twist them out. If this becomes the case usually the glass can be removed carefully, while turning slightly to snap any filament that may be still attached to the glass. Power Off and as suggested use pliers to ease the metal ...


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Use your vacuum cleaner. With the vacuum turned on, place the hose or extension tube on the light bulb, turn the tube and the light comes out. The same principle can be used to reinstall the replacement bulb.


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Since there's no grounding conductor in the box (i.e. the box is not grounded), touching a meter lead to metal is basically useless.Your COM probe should go to the grounded (neutral) (white wire in your case), then you can use the other probe to test for voltage. It sounds to me like there might be a problem with the wiring inside the fixture, since you ...


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I've done this using long nose pliers for the first few turns, until there were enough millimeters free to grab it with fingers. You have to be very, very gentle with them. I wouldn't use them on CFL bulbs because they are toxic when broken. But if you don't have the other tools suggested and the duct tape doesn't work, they are worth a try with a normal ...


2

You inadvertently bypassed the switch loop that controls that light fixture. There will most likely be a cable with a white wire that is not connected to any other white wire -- that cable is the switch loop in all but the newest installations.


3

Do you have a glass/cup with a similar circumference? If so, stretch the wrist of a latex glove around the rim. Fit the rim of the cup around the bulb and twist.


6

Use oven mitts with silicone grips Works like magic for opening light fixtures, changing light bulbs, opening jars, and so on. If you don't have silicone oven mitts, you can try a silicone baking mat. Just push the mat against the face of the light bulb and unscrew it.


8

Another trick is to pull the trim out with the bulb but not all trims connect the same. Some use springs, some clip into a socket, while others are sealed. But usually works for me because I do it all the time.


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Get a light bulb changer pole at your local home improvement store or your favorite hardware store. The ones with suction cups are best for flood lights, where the face of the bulb is a little flatter, but might have a tougher time gripping smaller, rounder light bulbs where you need something that can fit up inside the fixture and grip the sides of the ...


26

Take a piece of duct tape and wrap it in the shape of an "O", with the sticky side of the tape on the outside. Stick the loop of tape to the face of the light bulb such that it is secure. Put your hand (four fingers) inside the loop and twist counterclockwise to loosen the bulb. Credit: https://youtu.be/NNGyhRu7c0I?t=2m


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There's a company that makes suction cup hooks/hangers. You put the suction cup on an object and swing the hook. I'll bet you could attach one of these to the glass and use it to unscrew the bulb. I found this on Amazon. Edit: if the bottom of the bulb is highly curved, this won't work. The surface has to be flat or only slightly curved.


1

Timers come in two varieties: Timers with a neutral wire. These are connected between the hot and neutral wires of the circuit, parallel to the load. They're powered like any other device, and work by switching the hot (and possibly neutral) wires of the controlled circuit. These timers can control any device, but require a location with access to both ...


0

I have a similar situation in my restroom. My sensor is in the room and the time constant is 1 minute only. Each pulse of the motion sensor will reset the 1-minute timer, so after the door is closed from the outside (the last movement the sensor detects) the light will stay for 1 more minute and then be switched off. Everyone in the house is used to ...


0

In my country a junction box of applicable protection class (=IP code) is mandatory ... terminal blocks are never allowed to lay blank.


0

With GFCI Protection of Devices If you want to provide GFCI protection of the fixture, you'd feed the switches from the LOAD side of the GFCI device. Without GFCI Protection of Devices If you don't want to provide GFCI protection to the devices, you'd feed the switches from the incoming feeder. NOTE: I've labeled one of the dimmer terminals as "C" ...


0

Lutron Maestro line of switches can communicate wirelessly to multiple ceiling mounted occupy sensor that use a battery. The switches work the lights as normal if the sensors battery dies. I've installed them and give it a thumbs up. Battery Version


1

If I understand this situation correctly, both red cables are Positive and carry the current from switches. You may want to check both red cables if they really correspond to these 2 switches. If so, I guess You need to choose which circuit (1st red + N + E or 2nd red + N + E) You want to use, cuz I guess You will be using just 1 switch/dimmer (as Your 'new' ...


0

If it's a good quality power supply, the pulsing means the power supply is possibly overloaded. It's the power supply's, method of telling you that, which is called "hiccuping." A load of 156W may be too close to 200W. You should allow for load + 20% when choosing a power supply.


0

As Tester 101 said. It is a nuisance tripping AFCI (arc-fault) breaker. This is unfortunately quite common. More than likely there is no problem whatsoever. Keep contacting the electrician or GC to come back and replace the breaker.


0

You probably have 4 rails there, just two happen to be in-line, on either side of the power input (gray block in center.) Your problem is likely at the right side (in the picture) corner connector. Given that the power supply appears to be shared, the power supply would seem to be fine given the working lights - but the conductors are not conducting around ...


10

Specifically that is a 78mm T3 halogen lamp. I have one in my bathroom as well and love it because: The bulbs are pretty cheap. Usually a couple dollars. I bought 10 on ebay for $20. They are BRIGHT. Much brighter than LED bulbs, and some fixtures can take 200 or 250W bulbs. For a light over a mirror thats only on a few minutes a day, I dont care ...


2

As to "why" - Halogens were trendy for a while. They are somewhat more efficient (energy in to light out) than traditional incandescent bulbs, and offered a whiter light- long before serious LED lighting was developed. Longer bulb life is another factor (again, .vs. traditional incandescents) - work has one of those miserable fixtures that the Powers That ...


0

That's a type of halogen lamp.


5

Yes. If you connect one 54 watt strip, it will draw 54 watts through the power supply. If you connect seven strips, they'll draw 378 watts.


0

With low Volt electronic A/C transformer, higher voltages are to compensate for the voltage-frequency ratio output on the load side. Typical "puck" light electronic A/C transformer steps up the frequency from 50 or 60 Hertz to around 19,000 - 28,000 Hertz. Manufactures step up the voltage to 24 Volts on their more higher-end products. Instead of using a ...


1

LEDs don't really have a forward voltage requirement. They have a forward current limit, and that in turn affects the voltage. Current limiting is most commonly done with a resistor, the value is chosen with simple math using the forward voltage drop and desired/maximum current. You can use almost any voltage you want until you reach the sparky levels. ...



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