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0

Most likely you can pull power from an existing work box that has a switch, as long as you don't overload the circuit. This is a pretty common wiring task, but if you provide details or a photo of the wiring in the source box we can provide a wiring diagram.


0

Yes, a faulty dimmer. But only faulty by manufacture, not operation: certain components within the dimmer circuit will vibrate, at 60Hz and 120Hz (or 50/100Hz if that's your mains frequency). Because of this, manufacturers glue everything down, a process called 'potting', to the point where no components could ever be removed. Nobody's going to bother trying ...


0

Most likely a faulty dimmer if one buzzes and the other doesn't. Are the bulbs on both circuits the same type? Make sure the bulbs are designed to be dimable. (not CFL's)


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This usually means that the transformer either is not large enough or not compatible with your LED bulbs. It could also be a problematic bulb or socket, so before replacing the transformer, try the bulbs in different sockets and see if its still always adding the 4th bulb in the same location that causes the issue. If its always the same bulb, regardless ...


0

I would love it if PowerOverEthernet would provide the answer and it still may, but after reading examples of the voltage drop and drop in brightness along a series of LED strip lighting, AC sounds better.


0

You do not need to attach the green tail to the grounding wire in the box. By properly attaching this device to a properly grounded metallic box you are inherently providing an adequate grounding path. NEC 2011 404.9 Provisions for General-Use Snap Switches (B) Grounding. Snap switches, including dimmer and similar control switches, shall be ...


1

You would be best advised to shut off all live power feed to this box. Then pull the existing bare copper GND wires out of the back of the box and add an additional bare copper wire pigtail to the bunch. Then reattach to the box with the proper green grounding screw. The new pigtail will get wire nutted to the green wire on your new dimmer switch using an ...


1

Fluorescent fixtures can be rather tricky. With that many installed on the same circuit, what you might be seeing is an unbalanced load on the circuit, causing some of the fixtures to have full current and others, less, and quite simply a ballast, or any fluorescent will not work without full current. With the warm up times of older ballasts, combined with ...


0

Wow! You can use the screw in type LED bulbs, which contain their own controllers. These are typically dimmable down to about 20% using standard wiring. Here, we have Cree bulbs that look VERY similar to old Edison (tungsten) A19 bulbs, rather than the funny looking futuristic LED's. They're also much cheaper than the older screw-in LED's, about $8 each for ...


0

This is a complicated topic because it's very subjective, and also humans' perception of brightness is very inaccurate (non-linear). Among the many difficulties in comparing LED dimming to old-fashioned incandescent dimming: LED bulbs just don't dim as much. Some LED bulbs publish dimming specs (e.g. "dimmable to 10%"), but since humans' eyes are so bad ...


0

I'm in same boat. When I redid the house I'm in, I installed as much LED lighting as I could and the rest is halogen. What I've learned is, dimming range is based completely on the driver in the LED bulb. And most LED bulbs will only dim to about 20-30% of there maximum. I'm sure you know how dimmers work, but for those that don't it is basically a ...


0

If there are an even number of lamps, and you want them to be a lot dimmer, you could divide them into two groups and wire those groups in series with each other. Note that if any lamp fails that would cause all the other lamps in its group to become brighter and those in the other group to become dimmer. If the lights were near rated voltage after having ...


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Apparently there is now a three way LED bulb http://www.cnet.com/products/cree-three-way-led-bulb/


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I'm not sure what type of relay you're using, but most relays have at least five terminals. two coil terminals, used to power the coil. One common (C) terminal, where the circuit to be controlled will connect. One normally closed (NC) terminal; which is as it sounds, the side of the switch that is closed when no power is supplied to the coil. And one ...


0

I would be concerned if the switchboard isn't rated for the voltage/current. You can circumvent this by having the pi control another relay that is rated for the job. This relay can be either near the pi or near the switch. Some relays have 2 switched outputs (one being the inverted of the other) (single pole double throw). This allows for a proper 3-way ...


1

Would you try a motion sensor inside the closet rather than a jamp switch? That would allow the bypass sliders to close either way, and the light would go off after a certain time whether the doors were tightly closed or not. The motion sensor would trigger when one reached in to the closet, but getting it to come on reliably might be a bit finicky.


0

Probably. The only things that would cause you to not use an LED bulb would be that the housing is too small, the cover is too small (however you don't have to use this), or if you had a dimmer that was not compatible with the LED bulb. Given that we don't have the exact dimensions of your housing and cover, my advise would be buy a bulb and try it out. ...


0

We have the newer ceiling fans which take the tiny bulbs w/tiny screws, so we bought four adapters to take traditional light bulbs. However, they have a power limiter on the fan light unit where if you put more than 160 total watts in there, the whole thing won't work. So, we bought LED bulbs that look like the traditional bulbs & have the same screw ...


3

Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


-1

The LED bulbs emit electricity from only one side, unlike fl which are two sided. Your LED bulbs are shorting out. you have to remove the ballast in your fixture (or just cut the wires) and to replace the sockets in your fixture (from shunted to non-shunted). suggest you find an electrician experienced with LED or look on youtube for how to install linear ...


0

I've had a similar problem in my basement fixtures. Check the contacts on the tubes for corrosion and remove it with sandpaper. You can also check the contacts on the fixtures and run some sandpaper in them but make sure the power is off first.


1

That's not how it works. Unlike incandescent bulbs, florescent bulbs do not draw a particular amount of power - they are rated to handle a particular amount of power. They are actually "negative resistance" devices - which basically means they will draw an infinite amount of power if you let them. (Specifically: The more current that goes into them the ...


1

For incsndescent bulbs, usually the opposite. -- a 100W incandescent bulb puts out more light than two 50W bulbs. Though as a single source, shadows may be more of a problem. Not sure about fluorescents. LEDs are probably closer to a linear relationship between wattage and lumens.


0

So figured out the error was not with my understanding of the wires (although i was lacking some knowledge)... The actual problem was a defective dimmer. I tried a different one, and it worked instantly.


2

Without knowing exactly what you've got going on, it's impossible to say for sure what you have to do. It's totally possible that there are no "neutrals" in the box at all, depending on when the house was wired (and by whom). Here's what the schematic should look like... Basically, any wire that comes "after" a load, and creates a low resistance path ...


0

I've done it twice, in 2008 and just now. Several problems: 1) old socket is riveted; 2) tight space to rewire. I drilled the old socket out (through the rivet). Next cut off any remaining rivet bur for a smooth flat surface. Buy a replacement ceramic socket for a ceiling light. The one I bought had both black and white wires attached to the socket and ...


0

Those fixtures cannot be converted or changed. They are proprietary CFL fixtures in every way; sockets, wiring, ballast. Lightolier brand BTW. Your only option is to replace the entire fixture.


2

No, such an arrangement will either flat out not work, or have very poor reliability. The motion detector logic requires full uninterrupted voltage and a dimmer switch is going to inject noise into the power which will disrupt the motion logic or its sensor. Additionally, even if the motion sensor continued to work, the cycling of the light on and off ...


3

I believe that the electrical connection you are seeing is from the ballast ( the thing that Makes the fluorescent tube light) that is wired into the other metal box part of the Can. You would need to remove that ballast to put in another type of light in. It would be in the little panel that opens up that I can see in the 2nd Picture. In that box there ...


0

There is a lot of misinformation in the answers provided, in regards to LED bulbs. The difference between PAR & BR LED bulbs is minimal, and mostly cosmetic. Basically, the PAR bulb has a flat surface, while a BR bulb has a rounded surface. Given the same lumens, the same size, the same color temperature and the same lumens per watt, it really does not ...


2

You can get a remotely controlled wall switch. This comes in 2 parts. One is a switch that replaces your current indoor switch. The other is a remote control unit that wirelessly controls the switch. This approach does not require any additional wiring indoors or out. Just google "remote controlled wall switch" to see the various options available.


1

In my experience with SCRs or TRIACs (The "chip" dimmers usually use), the wattage rating is under "perfect" conditions (i.e. the area where the device is mounted says at "room temperature"). Now hopefully because they are in a commercial device they have been de-rated appropriately, but I have seen more than a few devices where the chip spec's were copied ...


1

If you got the halos at big box just go back and ask them to find compatible connectors and snip your LED connectors off. I would do it this way so that you can reuse for other light kits. Note: The connectors are proprietary HALO. I suggest contacting them and saying that you have messed a few up from their light kit and recessed housing. The might send ...


0

Short answer is if it's rated at 600w incandescent load and you have a 600w incandescent load and it was installed properly you're good. Longer answer, the warmer any electronic device runs, the shorter it's life. btw i it's next to or between another dimmer in a ganged box it's probably now rated for 500 or 400 watts it should be marked. Depending on ...


2

There are several factors at work here, all of which make 600 watts of incandescent lighting require a 1000+ watt dimmer: Most dimmers people choose (initially) are as cheaply made as possible. It might handle the rated load, but not for long. Since it is a dimmer, there is a probability that it will not be set to 100% all the time. An 80% (of fully on) ...


3

Although you'll probably get away with it, it's not a good idea. The 85W lamp rating is probably worse than 10% accurate, so you could easily go over the 600W. I advise you to remove one light or get a more powerful dimmer.


6

Personally I always go up a size in dimmer if I am that close to the limit. If it is ganged with other dimmers then derating forces you to. Will it work, absolutely. Will it fail sooner at that high of a load, most likely. Will it get very hot, definitely. Will it be dangerous, no, not really.


6

This depends on the manufacturer's statements. Typically switch devices are rated for their expected normal device load. Wiring heat loss, etc. should be negligible enough to ignore. Here's what one manufacturer said on their website: Electronic low-voltage transformers also dissipate some heat. These inefficiencies are small enough to be accounted for ...


2

If a dimmer switch is rated for 600 watts it will handle 600 watts. Most would actually handle well over 600 watts but would (supposedly) fail quicker. I don't see the concern at all. Your worry should be in the product not you failing to follow the directions. If this doesn't ease your mind you will need to call the manufacturer. [Although I can't see ...


0

I have a basement room with almost the exact dimensions. You walk in the basement from stairs and basement starts in almost a corner (3/4 basement) and then you walk almost the width of the house and it is about 14 feet wide. I have 4 cans right when you get in the basement on one switch by basement door and then a square zone of 4 in the back of the room ...


0

The amount of light should be determined by the use of the space. Unwelcoming (and unused) basements are usually dungeon-like (too dark). Use multiple switches or dimmers to can control how bright the room is. Another option is to use wall sconces. Some considerations for you: The brain can easily detect small changes in pattern, so make sure that the ...


0

That is a big room to be done in all recessed all on one switch. I'd break it up into switched groups or areas. Use your judgement as to how many. I would probably do more than you, like 8 or even 12, but it is your room and you need to be happy with it.


0

I had the same problem of blinking LED lights on a Modified Sine Wave (MSW) inverter. I changed my LEDs to the dimmable type and they seem to handle the harmonics in a better way. The blinking has stopped.


1

Most people find that a switch that activates when the closet door opens is simpler, easier, and more efficient than what you are describing.


1

If you have one nearby then I think you should have a look at Ikea. They have a range of affordable low voltage LED lighting systems many of which have integrated sensors which turn on/off the light when a door is opened/closed I understand they use an infrared sensor of some sort to detect the proximity of the door. Links are for Ireland, but I'm sure you ...


1

I've had good luck with this. The 50/50 Hitlights (or similar) waterproof LED strips and a transformer are fairly easy to install anywhere. You can cut the strips (seal the ends where cut & soldered with clear waterproof tape or plastic dip.) For a non-waterproof solution it's easier, you can simply cut and use the clip-on wire ends. You'll want to ...


2

Here are ten of the better rated LED lighting units available today, some utilizing touch/tap to power on and others with motion-detection. SUMMARY - 10 Affordable & Easy Ways to Add Lighting to a Closet Without Wiring Mr. Beams Indoor/Outdoor Motion-Sensing LED Ceiling Light - $19.99 Wireless Motion Sensor Light - 10 Super-Bright LED - $6.57 ...


3

You didn't say if you already had lighting in your closet or not. If you don't, I would suggest buying a stick-up (battery-operated) LED light with a motion sensor. (In my area, most retailers have several models like this.) Most interior motion sensors are combined with a switch, so if you don't want a switch then you may be out of luck.


1

It looks like the fixture is plastic, so it's not likely you'll have to ground it. The fixture strap (the brass color metal bits in the bag below the fixture in the photo) should have a threaded hole, where a green grounding screw can thread in. Install a grounding screw in the threaded hole of the fixture strap, and attach the house grounding conductor ...



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