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I just installed a Levitron 300w CFL dimmer in my newly renovated bedroom where I installed 4 recessed lights. The two CFL's dim great but the two LED 65w bulbs hum. I switched them around to make sure that it's not the switch but the bulbs that hum. After I switched out the 65w with a lower wattage the humming stopped. Make sure that all your bulb wattage ...


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I had exactly this same need, and did -not- want to use outlets or an entire system for just two switches at a place I will probably not be in another year or two. I found what I was looking for at a local HW store recently turned A*E. The brand is "Heath Zenith", the model is BL-6133-WH (the last two letters are the color, in this case White) I believe. ...


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You might try cutting strips of 3M adhesive Velcro, if there's a suitable place for both the hook strips and loop strips to be sufficiently concealed. Alternatively, you might be able to put something behind the 'clicking' hook so that the hook doesn't withdraw from the cover. (I'm thinking folded paper, or rubber, or foam) After that, depending on style ...


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As long as the water is clean it will work. The main risk is that some amount of water will remain. One solution is to fill a bucket with alcohol then dunk it in the bucket. The evaporation of the alcohol will take all the water with it and make it nice and dry. You can also sit it in the bright sun for a few days.


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All sorted now, basically I have a plastic back box but the earths have a connector on them. The Loop N terminals are for convenience, so I've just bought a connector block to connect them up. The L1 and Coms just need to have the same wiring on the new dimmer switch. I've not done it yet but got my answer from another forum.


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I guess that some clips or other parts that make this 'click' work are not catching firmly and/or are bending as because of temperature. I would try to adjust them if possible (if these are like metal parts) to grip more firmly. If that doesn't work You can either remove these light covers and make a complain in a shop You ordered them (as it shouldn't be a ...


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I notice that the failing bulb is next to your switch... so i'm suspecting damage from shaking the bulbs while turning them on and off. Which is a pity since I like the switch design... maybe you could redesign it as a wall-mounted switch? (I have an old gas key which I'm planning to adapt as the knob of a dimmer switch.)


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Air Tight recessed lights might prevent air seepage from a conditioned area to a non-conditioned area, but they can't do much about thermal transfer. Proper insulation is the only way to fix large amount of thermal leakage. However, your predicament is going to be that your fixtures are not insulation-contact (IC) rated. With non-IC fixtures, you'll not ...


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This leaflet just contains some general information concerning the product. The only thing relevant to installation is in point 5 (labeled 五). Basically, the user is told to connect what are literally labeled as the "fire wire" and "null wire" (火线 and 零线) -which I interpret as respectively the red and the black wires- to an AC supply of 180 to 250V, 50 to ...


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These lights are not standard 110V AC lights, but use 12V bulbs. In fact, each element consists of the light fixture itself, plus the associated 110V -> 12V transformer. In any transformer, there will be some loss of energy (no transformer has 100% efficiency), so some heat loss is to be expected. Moreover, in the manufacturer's documentation it is stated ...


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A pretty common approach is to build a small platform for the lamp to sit on, something like this This has the advantage of giving you more depth to mount a receptacle box. You can use 3/4 inch material (nominally 1x ) or larger, such as 5/4 stock. You can then cut a hole, using a hole saw through the new block and the siding underneath giving you enough ...


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I would opt to use a 1/2 pancake box 4" in diameter. The NEC code does not permit the canopy or empty space of a fixture to substitute for cubic wire space for wires larger than #16 gauge. And a 4" pancake boxes cubic space legally can only hold one 14/2. Since you already have the wire conduit on the inside of the house I would also consider using ...


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Not sure if it's the "approved" method, but I've seen it quite a few times (mostly for fixtures on the front of a garage). The fixture wires are fed through the hole into the box inside, where the electrical connections are made by approved means. Then the fixture is simply mounted directly to the wall, typically with a gasket between the fixture base and ...


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Sounds like you have one black hot wire coming into the box (probably that bottom one), which passed through a hot over to your bedroom switch. So my guess would be that you should have two of the blacks wirenutted together -- that would be the hot wire coming in to the box, and the passthrough to the bedroom light. Also in that bundle should be two ...


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14in light is a useless figure. What you're looking for is lumens. ("Replaces a X watt incandescent" is also useful, though affected by marketing a bit.) Get a target lumen value, then get a lighting setup that meets this value. LEDs vs fluorescents doesn't matter for getting enough light, just for power-saving purposes. Before you replaced the lights, was ...


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Option 1 A less expensive option if you don't mind having a plate behind the refrigerator is to put a 3 gang blank plate over the existing 3 gang switch box. Then feed out of it with the necessary wires to the other side. The electrical is pretty basic as all you would be doing is extending the switch loops/legs to the new 3 gang box. You do not ...


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I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


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An intermittent problem like that is almost always a broken switch or a loose connection. Often, you can "feel" when a switch is broken, so if it feels normal to you, then a loose connection might be the issue. Either way, you need to pull the switch out and check it out. If you are lucky and it is a loose wire, you'll just need to tighten the screw holding ...


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It's probably just a broken switch. My guess would be that the switch contact is worn out to the point that it does not make contact, but jiggling it a bit (by turning off and on again) may solve the problem, at least for a little while. Replacing a light switch is a pretty simple matter for a DIYer. I recommend swapping it out and seeing if that solves ...


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That fan should have a small plate with a single screw for each bulb. They are most likely 7 watt night light bulbs. You can tilt the fan over a bit to easier access the screws, unless the fan is semi-flush rigidly mounted. And yes, a stubby screwdriver helps.


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If that was installed in 1958, the wire may or may not have PVC insulation. If it's the old rubber insulation, it's going to be brittle. Bending the wires could crack and compromise the insulation. Also, it's virtually guaranteed that there is no ground wire in that fixture. You should check local electrical code to make sure that replacing the fixture ...


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The decision as to whether you have to remove and replace the existing light box rests on a number of factors. The electrical wire hookup to the existing light box appears that it may be under the access lid toward the rear part of the box in your picture. There will be a question as to whether the existing wiring will be long enough to make it to the ...


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Inside that small access hatch in your picture you will likely find the original wire connections in a small box. Make sure that power is turned OFF either at the switch (tape the switch in the off position and put a note there so nobody turns it on while you are working) or at the circuit breaker/fuse panel. Open the access hatch and disconnect the power to ...


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The smallest diameter recessed box to my knowledge is 3.5. Exposed "non recessed" boxes are definitely an odd choice for hanging decorative sconces. I also cannot stand sealing wall lights with silicon, nor do I recommend using those silly direct burial wire nuts.


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It sounds like two of your red wires form a switch loop to one of your switches. The remaining red wire is the hot (I believe called active in Australia?) coming into your ceiling. By connecting them all together, you have wired your light (and switch) directly to your unswitched power, which is why it stays on. You'll need a multimeter, voltage tester, or ...


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What is the wattage rating of the switch? Many dimmers are 300 watts (or less if they are trimmed to fit in crowded boxes). You are burning 390 watts. You may be overloading the switch. Your instincts about LEDs is correct, assuming the switch is LED compatible. You also need to be sure to select dimmable LED bulbs.


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If you are wanting to install a wall sconce, you need to install one that is rated for outdoor use. Note: The shape box you need to use will be dependent on what fixtures you would like to install. Some fixtures need round boxes while others require a rectangular box. My examples show round boxes, but this is not the only choice. Aside from being ...


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I had this exact problem. I bought two Home Decorator fans from Home Depot and installed them in separate rooms in my house. They have LED lights. I know for a fact that I wired them right because the model fan in Home Depot fan was wired the same and my remote worked perfectly with that fan. Both fans at my house had the same issue of the light not turning ...


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That maybe your only way, so you may have to use a stubby screwdriver. Who is the manufacture and what is model number of your fan. If you can, upload a picture.


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You are in code as long as there is enough room for every thing and you do not have to modify the can. The can would be considered the junction box. Also you need to make sure you have installed the correct cans for the type of insulation that is around the can, you should be okay. ie If the can is installed in an area that is surrounded by insulation the ...


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Dimming LEDs For a typical ceiling fan, the light fixture is exactly that-- a light fixture. It is nothing more than wires, a chain switch, and bulb socket(s). Dimming LED bulbs in a typical ceiling fan fixture will be completely dependent on ensuring a few things: The LED bulbs are dimmable The dimmer switch is rated for use with dimmable LED bulbs The ...


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I also recently replaced a toaster oven with a Breville Smart Oven, and the lights flicker only when it is in a mode which uses the convection fan. I added ferrite filters to the power line, which made the problem audible. This leads me to believe that the convection fan is driven with pulse width modulation (PWM), and that Breville's implementation of it ...


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Generally speaking, you must connect ceiling live cable (CL) to fixture live (FL) and ceiling neutral (CN) to fixture neutral (FN). As comments state, your fixture may not have a ground cable (strictly speaking), but some kind of screw, most probably with proper designation indented on it or with a proper sticker. If that's so, your ground cable from ceiling ...


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Extension cords are not supposed to be used for permanent fixtures. These fixtures are supposed to be hard wired or directly plugged into a permanent outlet. A common approach to solve this problem would be to install a switched outlet on the ceiling near the fluorescent lights. In many jurisdictions, you could use non-metallic cable to run the outlet and ...


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Longevity: LED's are generally marketed between 50k-100k hours of burn-time. I installed them throughout my home 18 months ago; none of them have failed yet. Grime Resistance: For a kitchen, buy waterproof strip lights like these - they'll hold up against steam. You can also fabricate an easy-to-clean cover using clear PVC and brackets Heat: If the strips ...


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Depending on the type of light you have your may have starters which precharge your light. If these are malfunctioning the light will not turn on or may turn on at random times. The starters will be a small component which you push in and turn counterclockwise to move. It usually appears under the shield of your light. they are less than a dollar usually at ...



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