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1

I'd use wire nuts to attach those to standard lamp cord, and put a standard plug at the other end...


1

If the dimmer itself is buzzing my suggestion is to replace the dimmer. I would only use a high quality dimmer like Lutron, Cooper, or a higher end Leviton. Also don't get a rotary dimmer. Many cheap rotary dimmers are low quality with little filtering.


0

It should be noted that while PAR LED's have the form factor of traditional halogen PAR bulbs, they do not have the parabolic reflectors of traditional PAR's. The light emitting diode cannot be suspended in space, in the middle of a reflector the way a filament can, at least not yet, it has to be mounted on a board. So, all of the light is coming directly ...


1

While this does not directly answer your question, perhaps it is worth your while to persuade the electric utility to adjust their equipment to get your service up to snuff. Distribution transformers have various closely spaced taps on them just for fine tuning delivery voltage. Utilities tend to be motivated to deliver full voltage because low voltage ...


2

It looks a bit of an unusual setup, but I'll hazard a guess that there is either a further light on the circuit either fed from one of the switches or the power from the circuit is fed in at a switch and feeds on from here to another light (or lights). (Obviously, you need to verify this, as we can't tell how it's wired from just one photograph). From left ...


2

There are fluorescent ballasts that accept a wide voltage input range (just as the LED ballasts that other answers are suggesting.) Since you appear to want fluorescent lights, those would be what to seek out. 100-277VAC is a typical input range, as is 120-277VAC (277 is common in 3-phase systems where a lot of commercial lighting is installed.) If you ...


2

Since you didn't specify your country, I'm assuming that you have a normal mains voltage of 230 or 240 volts. Yes, low voltage will cause your incandescent lights to dim. On the good side, they will last a lot longer than normal. If you want to try staying with incandescent lights, you can try higher wattages. For example, replace a 60W light with a 100W. ...


3

Since you say 150-180V is low, I assume you live in a country where the standard voltage is 230V? The first thing I would do is contact the electric company to see what they can do. It's possible there is a defect in the connection to your house from the main utility lines that's causing the abnormally-low voltage. There are probably all sorts of things ...


0

Another possibility not yet mentioned would be that some kinds of light switches will 99.9% interrupt current but still let through a tiny residual amount. This is particularly true of electronic dimmers that don't use a neutral connection (many need a tiny amount of power for their control circuitry) and for self-illuminated light switches. When using ...


2

All lamps have a size designation which is stated in eights of an inch (1/8"). That particular lamp will most likely not fit in your fixture if it is designed to take a standard A-lamp. That is an R30 size lamp which is 3-3/4" wide. An R20 style lamp (2-1/2" wide) would be more in line size wise with an A-lamp, which is actually an A-19.


1

there are so many brands and types of LED lamps. Some get hot some do not. All lamps give off heat though...compared to a 60W or more traditional light bulb...there's most likely less heat in an LED. But to answer your question....sure you can use an LED flood there. there are many options. I like 1000bulbs.com for buying stuff for the house. pretty ...


1

Read the rating carefully. If it says Max 40 w Incandescent, (CFL 9 W) then you are ok with the 11 watt bulb. This issue comes up from time to time, and it's due to a misguided belief that a 9W CFL is in all ways equivalent to a 40 incandescent. This is not true. Very simply, A 40 W element will consume and output 40 W of energy. Incandescents are ...


1

Any thoughts? Plainly something is messed up. I have many times taken apart a switch and discovered that the previous homeowner was creative in their choices. A recent one: white was hot and black was neutral, ground was open, the switch was wired to interrupt the neutral, the white wire from the lamp was connected to the black wire from the wall, and ...


0

If the lamp is rated for a maximum CFL bulb of 9 watts, then you shouldn't put an 11 watt bulb in it. If you do, you will be overloading the rating of the lamp by 22%.


3

The power consumption permitted by the fixture is 9 watts; the bulb that you've selected is 11 watts. You've exceeded the permitted wattage, even if it is by a very small margin. Is it safe? Most of the max wattage specifications by manufacturers are conservative, so you would probably be fine. But why exceed a stated limit? I would suggest considering a ...


0

I have used these inexpensive LED tape lights from Amazon.com with very good success. You can cut them down to as small as 4" pieces, and use connectors to get wire leads to connect to a driver. You'll need some low-voltage wiring to go between the tape ends and the driver. You have to calculate how much wattage you are putting on each driver, but they do ...


0

Take a pair of pliers and gently squeeze the socket to tighten it. This worked like a charm on my unit.Be gentle, as you don't want to break the components inside the socket.


0

In general yes. Use an LED bulb that is marked 'dimmable', and do not use it in an enclosed glass fixture -- many of the bulbs are made of plastic and can melt. Also, look for a bulb that has more even light distribution; older bulbs often had the LED elements on a rectangular bar that created 'stripes' of higher and lower intensity light, all of which ...


0

LED's of any consumer wattage run cool enough to use in any incandescent-rated socket. The warning is specific to halogen incandescent bulbs, which run hotter than standard incandescents. Go for it.


4

I'm assuming this is a 100 watt equivalent bulb, that is actually only running 18-20 watts. Using a 100 watt equivalent will be safe as they run much cooler than even an incandescent.


0

First off, I would get approval from your landlord before making any wiring changes to your apartment. You never know, he might be friendly enough that he would hire an electrician to make the changes you want. I would first attempt to figure out how the receptacles are wired to the switch. If there is a way to separate them, then I would do that. If not, ...


2

As put in the comments, you should never put a switch in the neutral of a light. Further, I am going to assume you are in a place where they use the wire colours as follows, because that seems the case in your drawing (I don't know all the world-wide colour schemes, but the most famous one that fits you image is this one I think): Brown = Phase ( = hot ) ...


4

Probably the glass bulb has separated from the base. Wear eye protection and heavy gloves. Turn off power to the socket. Pull the glass portion of the bulb out forcibly, breaking it if necessary. By spinning it around several times, you might be able to keep the glass intact and simply break the wires to the base. Unscrew the base from the socket by ...


1

If you're in the US, NEC likely applies. Article 402 covers fixture wires, and explains what types and sizes are allowed. Type Table 402.3 lists the types of wires allowed to be used as fixture wires. If you're going to rewire the fixture, you'll have to use a type of wire listed in this table. FFH-2 HF, HFF KF-1, KF-2, KFF-1, KFF-2 PAF, PAFF PF, PFF ...


3

18g stranded wire is quite common on arms 14g stranded is often used to join the 18g arm strands, and to tie into the ceiling. This applies to North America and normal chandeliers with relatively low (<50 each) wattage bulbs.


0

USA, 60hz,120v.- Using X10s (or Lutron Maestros?) it is possible if that switch has a neutral (which it'd better have) along with it's live wire. X10 fourms: If your switch boxes contain a neutral wire, you can emulate 3-way switching with a pair of "two-way", i.e., receive and transmit, wall switches and not require the traveler wire. (The switches ...


1

Yes wiring into your lighting is absolutely fine and would be a more complete solution as opposed to plugging the transformer into your wall socket. One thing with these 30A 12V transformers is that they are usually open terminal so I would advise you to get an enclosure if you do not already have one.


0

Quite simply yes you can. The reason for this is that with a non dimmable circuit the dimmable LED bulbs will either be on (100%) or off (0%) which both settings are absolutely fine for a dimmable bulb. There will be no problems and no flickering.


0

If once you plug the LED Tape into the transformer and you turn it on and it flashes on and off in a consistent motion. By this I mean a kind of slow strobe then the reason for this would be one of 2 reasons. Overload. This means the total wattage of the LED Tape exceeds the total wattage that the transformer can power. To work out your total wattage of ...


0

What you're describing is called "scene lighting" and is customarily achieved using automation modules either at the switches or fixtures. Each of the four configurations you have shown would be its own scene, and you would program each automation module to respond as either on or off when each scene is selected. I have use Insteon automation modules for ...


0

If you open up the switch box, is the switch attached to the black or red wire? It sounds like the switch is used to interrupt the red wire, while the black is uninterrupted. If this is the case, connect the light to the red wire instead of the black.


1

Ceiling fans are often wired for two power sources, one to the light and one to the fan. There may or may not be a wall switch for either. One standard way to wire this is to use four-conductor cable, with the additional "hot" power coming on the fourth wire. If you had noted how the fan was hooked up before you dismounted it, that would have helped. But, ...


1

PAR stands for Parabolic Aluminized Reflector, by the way. The numeric part of the number is the diameter in eighths of an inch. A PAR38 will be 4-3/4" in diameter and an R20 or PAR R20 should be 2-1/2" in diameter.


0

I'm going to assume; since power has to come from somewhere, that one cable is power from the panel, and the other is to the first light. Which means you should connect the two white wires together with a twist-on wire connector. Then connect the black wires to the switch terminals, one wire per terminal. When you connected it as in the first image, you ...


0

If you use low-voltage DC lighting (e.g. halogen), you can use the switch to switch DC power and use suitably rated diodes to provide power to the corner bulbs. You'd have to check the wiring in the walls can carry the required currents and take great care to isolate the DC side from AC.


0

You have not used switch n. 3 A better approach would be use it and simplify circuit logic: Using 3rd switch Not using 3rd switch If you must not use 3rd switch, use Boolean logic (more switches will be necessary). Boolean logic... can be achieved using Protoboard


1

Should be doable with relay logic. Switch one powers the center top light and the coils of two relays that do the top left and right corners. Switch 2 powers the left-center 2 lights and the coils of two DIFFERENT relays that power the top and bottom left corners. Switch 3 (once you correct your diagram per comments) powers the bottom center light and the ...


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


1

Every switch sits in-between two hot wires. One is always hot, from the mains, and one is hot when the switch is active, and that one goes to the controlled device(s). It sounds like you have connected the hot wire (black) from the mains directly to the hot going to the fixtures. The always hot switch should be connected to one black wire on the dimmer and ...



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