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I would use a half round light source, preferably LED. A 2mm light that is water proof and has a sealed cover. Insert in grout line, grout and wipe as usal. Only downfall is lighting malfunction. I intend on doing this on my next job in my home Hope this helps.!


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I would use a half round light source, preferably LED. A 2mm light that is water proof and has a sealed cover. Indert in grout line, griut and wipe as usal. Inly downfall is lighting malfunction. I intend on doing this on my next job in my home Hope this helps.!


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To be clear... you still have a dimmer, rather than a switch? If so, that's your problem in all likelihood. In terms of trouble shooting, if you know how to safely check the output of the dimmer, I'd bet you find out it's fried. Otherwise for 2 dollars, replace the dimmer with a switch. Should take ten minutes and I bet that's your problem.


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This is a ground wire. And it looks like the ground was added later or like only the cage is grounded. Remove it only if you are replacing the 2-wire cord with at least 3-wire cord. With 4-wire cord you can light the bulbs independently (power1, power2, (shared) neutral, ground). Also be sure that all metal parts are grounded.


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Connect the red wire to the fixture's black wire. Connect the white wire to the fixture's white wire. Connect the fixture's bare copper wire to the bare copper or green wire(s) in the ceiling box. If there are no bare copper or green wires in the ceiling, then if the box is metal connect the fixture's bare copper wire to that. As has been pointed out, ...


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Yes it is a ground wire. It is required by more-recent codes. They definitely can be unsightly. Instead of trying to paint it, which will look awful, just replace it. Some black-insulated, copper, 16 or 14 (or maybe even 18) AWG wire should do the trick quickly and easily. There's no need to disturb the other wires, just run the new black wire in the ...


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I'm almost certain it is the ground wire. Do not remove it. If you were to open the light fixture, there should be a screw where one end of the ground wire is attached. Then, mounted in the ceiling is a metal box through which is fed all the electrical wiring. There's a screw on the ceiling box that the other end of the ground wire is attached. Thank ...


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Generally speaking, all grounds can be bundled. You want the fixture, any metal boxes and conduit, and any switches all connected to the grounding conductor. In your case, bundle or chain them all together in the simplest and most secure manner available. Don't put more than one wire under a screw, and use appropriately-sized nuts where needed. Use short ...


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How about something like this product (Thanks to A I Breveleri for pointing me in the right direction): http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ProductDetail.jsp?partnumber=5685-2E&section=47084&minisite=10251 15 Amp, 120/277 Volt, Decora Plus Rocker Double-Throw Ctr-OFF Maintained Contact Single-Pole AC Quiet Switch, Commercial Spec Grade, Self Grounding, ...


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Remote control. A two device unit, one part plugs into the wall outlet and the lamp plugs into it, and the other is a remote control. The remote can be mounted on the wall or Mobil. there are many versions of this option. I am waiting for the price to drop on the Philips Hue system, smart phone controlled and geo tag-able. do a youtube search for "Philips ...


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There are lots of plug-in receivers, or controllable outlets, for the various home automation systems. Then all you need is a compatible transmitting switch, possibly battery operated. Example: I currently have an X10 setup (cheapest home-automation product in all senses of the word cheap; adequate for playing with for now) in my living room where a remote ...


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Use a single pole double throw switch, called three-way in the U.S. (as isherwood suggests). Wire it like this and the circuit will do what you say you want. Of course with this, there is no way to ever switch everything off, so the circuit will consume power as long as the building stands. We strongly advise you not to do this. Instead, (again, as ...


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A single-pole, double-throw switch would do the job. A common 3-way switch is exactly that. You'd simply connect power to the common screw, and run power out from each of the traveler screws. All the neutrals tie together. Here's a nice animation showing the idea. More on switch terminology


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Is the fixture made of metal? If it does not have external metal components (such as a case or cage) then it would have no use for a safety ground. The safety ground is connected to conductive surfaces that shouldn't normally carry power, but if you don't have conductive surfaces then it is not applicable. However, if the fixture does have external metal ...


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You will need a ohmmeter. Disconnect the IR Controller (the white box with white wires). If you check the the voltage drop (in the connector of the white wire) between the Positive (+) and the different wires. If you find that they all respond to commands from the remote... except for the port for the blue wire (which controls the blue light), then the ...


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Wires and connections must be contained in an enclosure that is designed for that purpose. You might be able to find a decorative canopy extension ring at a good lighting and/or fan shop. it might look something like this:


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Am I missing anything? Is there a piece of equipment I'm overlooking? Yes. Large solar panels can be bought individually rather than cobbled together from smaller ones. These are designed to feed from the panel as-built rather than having to be modified. Example here. So what you need to do is find a low voltage garden light system (perhaps one powered by ...


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Three way light switches can be wired several ways, and yes, there is often red wires involved in the traveler or perhaps a 14/3 split power feed going to another circuit. So my advise, without back tracing and figuring out exactly where each wire goes and is used for, is to use the exact same two red wires. If possible, use a voltage meter or proximity ...


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Thanks for the suggestions, I finally figured it out. This is a new one for me. Several lamps on the top fixtures were loose (still working fine but loose). When I opened the fixtures to check the grounds the noise reduced by the time I got to the last one the noise was gone. My wife thinks when we loaded the hay loft in June we must have shaken them loose. ...


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The answer depends more on the (triac) dimmer. LEDs have a sweet spot for voltage and will operate for a long time in the sweet spot. LED/triac dimmers actually just turn on and off rapidly. LEDs can handle the on/off better than other kinds of light, but the "flickering" would be the factor in break-down. At 0V obviously the LED would last for a very long ...


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In the UK colours are as follows old UK colours newer EU colours live red brown neutral black blue earth green green/yellow The switched-live from switches is often insulated with the neutral colour (e.g. black) and should have red tape over it to indicate it is switched-live not neutral. Your ...


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Here's what doesn't apply to you, but does apply to most consumer LEDs (sold as primary lighting devices, i.e. screw in bulbs, fluorescent replacements etc): They are significantly overdriven from spec, for instance an LED will be sold as a 10 watt emitter, however the datasheet will spec it for baseline performance at 1050ma at around 3.3 volts - now hold ...


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Put a screen over/around the lights... this is called a faraday cage. By putting a farady cage over the lights, you will block the interferance emitted from the ballast (or anything else). You should read about them... but here's a video: The Difference Between Grounded and Ungrounded Faraday Cages Regarding AM, FM & 2.4 GHz WiFi (microwaves) In this ...


1

Moral of the story -- if you have pieces of a UL listing label, the UL folks can help! It turns out the OP wasn't typing the correct UL number into the database -- the E-##### listing number was eaten away by rust. So, I suggested he call UL, and he reached a friendly guy named Jim who was able to figure it out: I called UL and Jim at UL helped me. It ...


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Yes, it is okay to use 12-2 cable to supply lighting fixtures. The other answer indicates that it even with 12-2 you have to use a 15A breaker for lighting circuits which is not strictly correct. If the entire circuit is 12AWG (other than fixture wires), then a 20A breaker may be used. If only part of the circuit is 12AWG while other parts are 14AWG (other ...


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Modern retrofits do not use a ballast at all like this. Most have universal drivers, they can run on 100-277 VAC 50Hz or 60Hz. Here is another example. Things to think about, the color of light 5000K will be a very white closer to sunlight, 3000K is more yellow orange. With the same lumens I think the 5000K and higher wavelength lights look brighter with the ...


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The existing fixtures are fluorescent, right? If so, then the ballast is typically in the fixture. Remove everything. You didn't say whether you're planning to set up a LED power source and distribute that. That might be a lot of work. If you are just using LED bulbs with standard threaded base (same base as incandescent bulbs), then just install whatever ...


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You only need two wires. The earth, or ground, wire is a safety measure should something go wrong with the wiring inside, exposing a live wire. Older homes don't even have such a thing throughout the home and often include a three prong electrical outlet through "updating" without wiring up the ground connection.


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The ground-neutral voltage is no big deal. You ought to have some voltage difference if there's any load on the circuit. I would start by eliminating radio jamming. Get a battery powered, portable radio - a car or truck will suffice. Do you get the same interference? If so, the problem is radio (RFI). AC power line conditioning will do nothing. Most ...


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Sounds like you have skinned a hot wire that is touching the metal box or one of the ground wires. With the power off pull the switches and look for a burned spot. If the wire is still ok not damaged from shorting it can be taped with a quality electrical tape. If the wire is damaged you will want to cut it and pigtail a new piece. This happens even to ...


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My psychic powers (required for deciphering your question) suggest that you have a two-tube 48 inch (not foot) florescent fixture. Sounds like you need to replace the ballast. They don't live forever.


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Assuming only one fixture controlled by that switch, you seem to have a typical switch loop here. Connect per this diagram:


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A15 refers to the size of the glass part. The small base size is known as an E12 Candelabra base. Anything with that size, screw-in base should fit in the socket, but it has to be A15 to fit within the shade. Also, watch out for the rating or brightness of the bulb. The Harbor Breeze model ceiling fans usually say MAX 60W. So that's around 14W for CFL ...



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