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1

This will work, or at least you can connect it. Right now we will trust that it is the right dimmer for the lamps. You have all you need, and if you have made it this far, you will be fine. Adding to the confusion in this project is that the dimmer can be used for either a single pole switch, or a 3 way switch. (Kinda clever for sales, but frustrating ...


2

Yes replace the ballast. You might as well buy some new tubes while you are there too. And a few grey wire nuts. Find the price for a completely new fixture, before you start looking at the ballasts. The results might surprise you. Read the ballast, it will tell you what it was designed to do. Something like 4 wire, 2 tube, 32 to 40 watt, double pins. ...


0

This can also be a sign that you bought a dimmer that is designed for incandescent bulbs, but you have it controlling CFL or LED bulbs. This can absolutely make it buzz. If the dimmer was not explicitly for CFL and LED bulbs and those are what you are running, then you need to get new dimmers that are explicitly for those bulbs.


2

You'll have to purchase a timer that is specifically designed to work as a 3-way switch. Or you'll have to rewire the other 3-way switch in such a way that it will no longer control anything. Since I can't see the wiring at the second switch, I'm guessing the wiring currently looks something like this... Which is sketchy, since there's no grounded ...


1

130V bulbs are also used in locations that are hard to access, like extremely high ceilings, because of the labor saved by not having to replace them as often.


1

Based on what you've shown, you should be able to wire it up like this... However, those red Wing-NutĀ® twist-on wire connectors are only rated for a maximum of 6 #14 conductors. So you'll have to split up the neutrals in to two groups, and connect the groups with a pigtail between them.


1

After wrestling with 3way (i call them "two pole" but to each their own) switches I have learned that the only way out is patience and testing. Don't trust the wire colors. Unhook the switches from both sides (or just one switch if you are sure the other hasn't been altered since it was working), put wire nuts on the open wires, and power the circuit back ...


0

In short, you don't really want to do this. The motion sensor is a simple two-position switch, and it can't be easily used in a circuit with three-way switches. You would end up violating the code requirement that there be two points of control of the light, one at each landing of the staircase, each able to turn the light on or off independently of the ...


1

I'm guessing your wiring looks something like this. So if you also draw the grounded (neutral) conductors, it looks something like this. Drawing it like this you can clearly see, if you connect the grounded (neutral) conductors in box 5 (B5) to the grounded (neutral) in box 1 (B1), you'll have a giant loop. It shouldn't cause any problems, ...


1

What you will want to do in your case, instead of nutting all the neutrals together (which is technically a 310.10(H) violation!), is keep the neutral from the breaker at B1 and going to B2 and the existing light fixture separate from the neutrals coming in from B4 and going out to the two recessed-light circuits -- in other words, B1 and B5's neutrals are ...


0

All fed from one breaker... all neutrals together, all grounds together. That's how I was taught.


0

The problem is 'low voltage' lights on an incandescent/halogen dimmer. Here is information on dimmer types, and will help you find the right one http://www.lutron.com/en-US/Education-Training/Pages/LCE/DimmingBasics.aspx


1

To do what you ask: Disconnect the supply for the fan switch - wire-nut and tape it (it will be going no-where.) If it's a jumper from the light switch supply, just remove the jumper. If the light switch is supplied by a jumper from the fan, remove the jumper and move the supply to the light switch. Put a pigtail on the light switch switched hot, and ...


0

A 6A (12v) adapter will probably be sufficient. If your design allows, you'll see less voltage drop (dimming as you get further from the power source) if you can use shorter segments.


3

I searched far and wide to find a solution for this for my own remodel. The orange connectors used by most of the lighting manufacturers is a standard IDEAL product - you can order them online in large quantity or on auction sites in smaller ones. You can retrofit the HALO cans to be compatible, or even use the connectors (as I did) to connect to GU10 ...


0

I found a suitable workaround. It is quite simple, but I wasn't aware of when I asked the original question because I didn't know how these things worked. The solution is just to buy one 3-way occupancy sensor and place it in the hallway and keep the staircase one (located in the living room) as is (i.e. regular manual switch). It will cover 80% of use ...


0

DMX512 is the protocol for the lighting entertainment industry, used everywhere. It is also just another serial protocol, and you will still require dimmers. 12 or 24 volts, instead of 240 is a great idea, there is no electric code to get in the way of how you run the wires. This 'low voltage' concept is why telephone wires can go anywhere you want. The ...


0

For American readers: I cannot find any language in the NEC expressly prohibiting the use of switches (motion-sensing or manual) in parallel for ORed lighting configurations such as the OPs. However, there's another problem, and that's user expectancy; even with manual switches installed, most people will see this setup and think "three-way switch", not ...


3

There are more choices than you might think http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/SectionDisplay.jsp?section=38557&minisite=10251 I am thinking you might want a 3-way, manual on, auto off. But whatever Pattern, Coverage, Time delay, or Switch type, you will likely find it here. You can get leviton stuff anywhere, it is likely one of these would be a special ...


0

I have a LiftMaster opener and my bulbs go out frequently, although they are not burned out. It seems the socket is actually too wide for the bulb. I've never seen this problem before, but I can actually move the bulb back and forth in the socket and the light will go on and off when I do it. Seems that a little vibration inevitably jiggles it to the "off" ...


0

At the risk of being a complete ass, you are likely putting way too much effort into a plan that is not likely to work. You start with, "My tenants never turn the lights off ... ." This is not an issue of electrical wiring, this is about the tenants behavior. In trying to help, my question to you is, why do you think your tenants are not going to just ...


0

Yes, you can, under code, but you will also need to have 'real' switches also installed. As far as the second part write on a bit of paper, in marker, and stuff it in the the motion sensor junction box. Will both of the sensors cover the entire stairway? This is the game changer.


1

I always leave a dead bulb in a socket, it is not like the electrons are going to fall and waste electricity without something in the socket, but it is so much safer. 002-00125-000 a product number from amazon , it changes the socket into a plug, in the middle of the page, there is a version for $2 I will feel better if you do.


1

The simple answer is the one you least want to hear, though most likely the correct one. There's a fault in the wiring, and the breaker is doing the job it was designed to do. If you don't have the tools and/or knowledge to locate and repair the fault, it's time to step aside and let the pros do their thing.


0

I know you are to avoid making statement based on opinion, so here is my thought. The Breaker, like me, has gone soft and infirm. The 'thermal' part of the thermal-magnetic breaker was willing to tolerate the slow death of the burned switch, but it weakened itself in the process. So the slightest load will now trip it.


1

Did this salesman have an old wife who told tales ? The reason you 'need' a ceiling is because CFL's have a lot of ways to fail, many of them are a slow death, where it 'sort of' or 'sometimes' or 'almost' works. A swift and painless death requires heat, more is better, lots more heat is even better than that. Anything that can trap heat, including a ...


4

For those who like to do things the hard way, it is also 7004-21A-2 (From IEC Standard sheet 60061-1 (of course) The E26 is the 'standard' for 110 Volt systems and the E27 is the standard for 220 Volt systems. (The E27 being IEC 7004-21)


5

The US 120 volt screw base is an E26. The 'E' indicates an Edison screw base and 26 is the diameter in millimeters. Source: Wikipedia (footnote 3) In 120-volt North America and 100-volt Japan, the standard size for general-purpose lamps is E26


0

There are switches that have motion sensors in them. There are also Light fixtures that have sensors in them, you would need all new fixtures. If by spot lights you mean recessed lights this may not work. We had the switch type in a rental once. I may put them in a hall but never in a main room as every few minutes you had to wave your arms to turn the ...


0

I would double check the 3 way /4 way switches. I put some in my home and the diagrams did not always match the posts on the switches. For eg. In your diagram both hots are on left. Some switches have both hots on top or one top left hot one bottom right hot. Different makers diferent designs. Edit: sorry ment to comments not answer.


1

Many CFLs take time to warm up, covered ones are worse than the naked spirals. See http://www.litetronics.com/lighting-technology/why-do-covered-cfls-have-a-long-warm-up-time.html


0

I'd recommend starting by replacing the bulbs to rule out any issues with them. Assuming the bulbs has been ruled out, it sounds like a bad electrical connection. If it is affecting many lights, then it's likely upstream, perhaps at the switch, but if not, in another connection point. Could even be in a receptacle along the same circuit. Do you know ...


1

You could run conduit around the corner from your existing light to the new light and just feed the new light off the same switch. Regular NM cable doesn't have UV-resistant sheathing and won't give you a weatherproof entry into either light fixture, and MC isn't weatherproof. But in a pinch, if you consider it temporary and if you feed the fixtures from the ...


1

You can run the light from the switch. This is a one hour job for an electrician. It doesn't get much faster than that.


0

Newer LEDs malfunction in the same way. I have had to re-install one incandescent in a circuit of two or more lamps. In this case all the LEDs stay on steady at a low level. When I put in an old bulb problem solved. In another case the light switches had the neon find-the-switch-in-the-dark toggles. The CFLs went crazy, and one incandescent fixed it.


-1

yes you can over ride the motion with a 3 way sw to work manual or go back in motion. you need a 14/3 and 14/2 going to motion flood hot going to direct motion and red on 14/3 going to light black going to red on motion all naturals together red on common screw of 3 way and hot on same side other screw of common and black of 3 way on other screw


4

As @mikes said, this is a replacement part - NOT a complete fixture. Rather than cobbling up some mess of electrical tape, just buy a plain porcelain (or plastic, though oddly the porcelain are often cheaper, and I assume the reason you are contemplating this at all is to keep costs down) lampholder that is designed for the job, and don't create an ...


5

You are right to be concerned about safety. Attempting to use the sockets as they are is a hazard, the exposed conductors are an electrical and safety concern. What you have is a replacement part for repairing a damaged fixture.



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