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2

First of all, when you read about a "50W LED", it is certainly saying that it outputs the equivalent light of a 50W incandescent light (although that is often a exaggeration). That "50W" LED actually draws less than 10 watts. This means that it draws much less current and emits much less heat, both of which are the factors that typically limit the allowable ...


0

You can put some tape over the opening and a warning label stating that they are still connected. If you want to expend the effort you can remove the sockets and put a cover where the wires came out (again with labels stating the hotness of the wires).


7

Depends on what you mean by "safe". I wouldn't entirely trust it with a kid in the house, but it's probably fine for adults. On the other hand, you can make it a bit safer by screwing in a dead bulb (which, like everyone, you'll acquire over time), or one of the edison-base-to-outlet adapters available at hardware stores. I'd consider either of those ...


0

Based on the description you've provided in your comment. You should be able to install a combination GFCI switch device in the first bathroom, which will provide GFCI protection to the light and the rest of the circuit. Install the GFCI switch combo as follows: All grounding conductors left off for simplicity. Make sure all devices are properly grounded. ...


1

Having been in the business for over twenty years I would say "ceiling clouds" is a relatively new term, although I would instantly know what the customer was referring to if they used this to describe it. Personally I would refer to it as a "ceiling raft".


0

I have the same prob with the flash on start up. I replaced the first bulb with an incandescent and the flash went away. Not sure why.


0

Newer electronic ballasts run fine with lamps removed. Many replacement ballasts can be wired for several combinations of lamps, such that a 4-lamp ballast can be wired to a 3 or 2 lamp fixture. This will be shown right on the label and wiring diagram.


-2

To the best of my knowledge, you should be fine. However, I'm not an electrician.


2

They have them for sale on E-Bay for less than $20, they are designed to work with incandescent 3-way bulbs but I think they make them for LEDs now too. Try E-Bay


0

You need to connect the switched live to the brown wire in the new fitting and the neutral to the blue wire. The neutral will be one of the black wires. The switched live may be red, or it might be a black wire in one for the T&E cables (though it should have red tape or sleeving on it if it is...). You might need look at the switches to try and figure ...


2

Yes, there are prepackaged touch switch modules whose input wire can be attached to any convenient piece of metal.


2

You've pretty much got it. If you can twist wires with wire nuts and connect them to a switch you have the technical skills needed. The hardest part is usually pulling the wire from the wall into the ceiling. Get an "old work" ceiling/light box. Cut a hole in the desired ceiling location, ensuring no joist will interfere with anchoring the old work box ...


-1

I would look for a ceiling light that is mounted with regular expansion plug screws (or whatever kind of screw is applicable to your ceiling material) instead of older methods such as hooks or threaded pipe. Then it's just a matter of running the wires (or rather, some proper electrical conduit such as corrugated tubing) from your switch to that spot over ...


0

I have a 3-way fixture that I use a regular dimmable LED bulb in. The 3-way fixture is plugged into a dimmer switch that is plugged into the outlet. It works just fine.


1

There are standard switches for closet doors They can be mounted in a cutout in the jamb, one for each door on each side. For your purposes, you want normally closed switches (makes contact when no pressure is applied). Many can be wired either way. When the door is slid back into the switch, the circuit opens and turns out the light. Images and links ...


2

From a functional point of view, you want the two switches in parallel, normally-closed but held open when the door is in its closed position, so that if either door is open the switch closes and the light comes on. The switches may control the light directly or, if they are low-voltage switches, may control a relay which controls the light. (If you're using ...


0

A cable needs to terminate in a box or an approved fixture (which has the equivalent of a box built in). In your picture, the wires seem to hanging down with no such device. You can attach a very small box on the surface of the ceiling. The cable (the outside casing including the wires) is then attached to the base plate of the box with a connector. The ...


1

I don't know what the right answer is, but I'd probably go with attaching an adhesive screen, using non-shrinking plaster/spackle over that to fill in the area, then trying to tool the surface to vaguely resemble the rest of the design. If you were trying for a museum-quality repair the answer would probably be to actually take a mold of the opposite side ...


5

There are a bunch of different styles of universal cross-bars, including ones that are designed to be mounted with a nipple. I'd just check your local hardware or big box store. Some examples:


1

Imagine a ladder. This is a good representation of a parallel circuit. A lamp on any rung of the ladder will light but it is not required that any one of the rungs have a lamp working in order for the others to work.


0

My instinct would be to either go ahead and pull the third wire, or to try to solve this with something like the Lutron remote switches.


0

Traditionally, the -c just means "cover". Google "GU-10 vs GU-10-c"


1

This very much sounds like a thermal issue trip issue in the fixtures. If the lights are not blinking in sync with each other then this not a power supply circuit problem. And you've tried different bulbs. It is a fixture problem.


1

There may also be an issue with the wiring above the ceiling; the copper may have oxidized, causing gradually poorer contact between two conductors. first up: try changing at least one light bulb. As you remove the old bulb, twist it several times back & forth at the "nearly tight" position to help rub the contacts clean, and do the same with the new ...


2

According to the National Electrical Code, you can replace the fixture without a ground as long as the outlet is GFCI protected. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 410 Luminaires, Lampholders, and Lamps V. Grounding 410.44 Methods of Grounding Luminaires and equipment shall be mechanically ...


1

If you can get enough access to install a BX connector on that armored cable, and if you can establish that the armor is actually a good protective ground (some armored cable only "floats" electrically), then you may be able to use a "remod box" to connect to the BX and claim your ground from the box. If none of those is true, then you really should do ...


3

A parallel circuit is what you're referring to. In a series circuit, if one connection is broken, the entire circuit is broken.


1

The problem may possibly lie in the ballast, the tube(s), or the switch. The simplest initial test is to replace the tube(s) with (a) new one(s) and see if the problem goes away. If so, the problem was in the tube(s). Testing the ballast and the switch is a little more complicated, but made simpler by ensuring that the fixture is equipped with (a) ...


2

Almost certainly the ballast, unless old enough to actually have a separate starter, at which point it becomes a tossup between ballast and starter - probably not from 1992. But a 1992 ballast is certainly ripe for replacement 22 years later. They don't live forever. I have a few older ones I have not gotten around to replacing that are very ...



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