New answers tagged

0

I think ThreePhaseEel and A.I. Berveleri have figured this out. That circuit was originally wired for a light only, with a 12/2 cable going up there - hot (black), neutral (white) and ground. Somebody added the fan later on, and they cheated. They used ground for neutral. They used black for the fan and white for the light. First, mark your wires. ...


0

Need a little more information to help. Does the fan have any pullchains on it? If it's a single switch on the wall, one of the chains typically sets the light to be on/off while the second chain sets the fan speed/fan off. Any chance a chain got pulled?


1

According to any number of help pages, e.g. this one, MR16 sockets and bulbs are designed for 5 to 24 V operation. It's highly likely that's what you've got here. So the question becomes: what is your current operating voltage, and what is the voltage requirement for the LED bulbs you bought? If there's a mismatch, that's why things don't work.


3

This symptom is impossible without silicon electronics being involved in the delivery of power. Passive wires and windings are not capable of causing this. Common problems are common, and my first take is usually correct - a series connected old-style smart device. But Carl Witthoft has an interesting theory: these are probably low voltage bulbs. We know ...


0

In such a large space, any of them will be weak tea. If you can rearrange the space so the glowy sparkly things are in one area, that'll help a lot. You definitely want fluorescent lights. Party style blacklight is near UV light, meaning, just outside visible range. Fluorescents make UV naturally, LEDs and incandescents can barely make UV at all. ...


2

The Tospo is a cheap Chinese ballast. To find ballasts, start with what bulbs will fit in the fixture (all the better if you have a bulb already). Then search for ballasts meant to drive that bulb (which also fit in your fixture). I think I see several on 1000bulbs.com in the $20 range. LED strips really, really do not like to bend on the flat side. ...


0

you probably have the dip switches set differently in the transmitter compared to the receiver. you just need to open the receiver housing, check the switches and make sure they are set the same in the transmitter (assuming same model, frequency, etc is correct)


1

The most common transformer-less LED lights are christmas tree (fairy) lights. They aren't designed for high light output, and typically don't have color control meant for room lighting. You could buy separate strings of red, green, and blue Christmas lights, but they wouldn't be easy to control if you're interested in color control. I'd suggest using ...


0

Wire nut all black wires.use meter. It's safer than letting them stay open and hot. To be honest I'd check the rest of ur sockets. The arc flash burns in box is a dangerous sign


2

The simplest thing to do is to turn the breaker on and figure out which black wire is supplying the current. (This is arguably one of the more dangerous approaches, but it is safe if you follow precautions like have someone guarding the wires so they are not touched while the power is on.) Use a multimeter and test the voltage between the ground wire and ...


1

I am guessing that if you apply a meter you will find that the single black and white on the right address power coming into this switch box, and the wires on the left run to the lights. If so the switch installs between the left black and the right blacks, to interrupt the hot line, the whites are all tied together to provide the neutral connection (as ...


0

Your cheapest, easiest solution is low profile surface mount luminaires. They come in LED and flourescent varieties. If you want to have all lights switched you could use Michael Karas's suggestion of power line signaling or wireless switches. Otherwise, get ready to get dirty fishing wiring into a closed ceiling. Good luck!


4

Disclaimer: while this did work, and the insides look as if they're designed for something like this, I'm not sure if it was the exact correct intended approach. Follow these steps at own risk! Based on Tester101 and Ed Beal's suggestions I tried pushing the ends. I think it was spring-loaded at both ends - by firmly but gently pushing the holder on one ...


0

Sounds like a single-pin tube, which are spring-loaded in one direction or the other, not twist-lock like the bi-pin tubes.


0

Just to point out the other solution: Any the new fixture as a swag lamp, surface-mounted with a decorative treatment bringing the power cord across the ceiling and down to an outlet. That's how my living room is currently lit. Or do a fake coffered/beamed ceiling, running the wire through the "beams".


0

Yes those sockets fit on normal single gang backboxes. The easiest soloution is probablly to just fit surface mount plastic boxes and then run normal twin and earth cable (any size from 1mm2 to 2.5mm2 will be fine) between them. No need for conduit. Surface mounting is easier both because you don't have to make a hole in the wall and because surface bozes ...


1

Short answer: Yes How much do you know about electricity? First off, get the data sheet for the ballast you want to troubleshoot. You will have to test for voltage between the pins on the ends of the lamps and then from one end to the other to see if it matches the rating of the ballast. If it is an electronic ballast it will be more complicated than an ...


1

Thing is, if you replace a ballast it is always best practice to replace the lamps as well. With older magnetic T-12 ballasts the lamps will go out in pairs, even if one lamp is still good, so troubleshooting can be annoying. With T-8 electronic ballasts lamps go out individually. If all the lamps go out at the same time, or are even just all out, it is ...


1

Yes if they don't light and the ends of the bulbs are black you just found 1 answer the bulb is bad. If you replace the bulb and still have trouble your problem is the ballast, electronic ballast die when overloaded. I almost left a sarcastic note at the end of this but will explain. After just changing 3 ballast in very high end fixtures that the owner was ...


0

Green in house wiring is always ground, White is neutral. Hot is usually black or red but can be many other colors. The green wire goes to the bare copper ground. The white goes to white the neutral. Now the question is what black wire is hot, The black that is connected to both switches is the line side or hot leg. The switched leg is the black on the other ...


0

Some combination of the switch, ballast and lights you have may not be 100% compatible. Take a look at Lutron's LED Selection Tool. You can pick the dimmer and the lights you have and then you can pull up a PDF report for the testing they have done.


0

If you read on the package you took a picture of it states incandescent you will get a humming with cfls, or any fluorescent bulbs for that matter due to the igniter that excites the gas inside which produces the light. Incandescent bulbs use filaments which are small pieces of wire that are made to light up when "shorted". Hence the reason for the humming. ...


1

I noticed that putting a powerful magnet near the cord of my dimmed lights can eliminate the hum. Maybe you could get some semi circular magnets, and place them around the cord?


3

Related products are commonly called bulb dipping paint for example: They do make light bulb paint my mom used to make some directly on the bulb but then when it burns out the design is lost. This looks like a clear shade that was painted, I always thought that was better so you could rotate the fixture and the rainbow , Christmas tree , hearts, or bunny ...


0

if you use an incandescent, i cant offer any suggestion as i dont know of any. however, if you go to led, surface temp is lower, and almost any paint would work. just thin it with clear coat to get the transparency effect



Top 50 recent answers are included