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What type of breaker do you have? I have experienced a similar issue with circuits protected by GFCI breakers. It could be bad wiring or it could be a light fixture that has a short of some type or it could just be the GFCI breaker. Id try everything prior to rewiring!


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There are many varieties of three and four conductor cables that have unequal size conductors for this very reason: http://www.wireandcabletogo.com/Underground-Secondary-Distribution-Cable/


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The two hot legs are NOT out of phase! They are completely in-phase. No current flows through the neutral when the same load is applied to both legs of the hots because all of the current flows through the hots (only) from one end to the other across the entire length of the (power pole) transformer secondary winding. A difference current flows through the ...


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Well, if we trust google's reverse image lookup, that's a picture of 3528 led light strips in action. The problem is, those light strips have emitters every 5/8", so it's my opinion that you're looking at a bit of photo trickery or a diffuser that isn't ordinarily a part of those kits.


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Be careful when reading residential voltage with a DVM meter. My Fluke will read 121VAC at a single pole switch with the switch On, and 50vac with it off. But the scale changes from V to mv (milivolts). The scale changes dynamically and the v in milivolts on my Fluke is very small. 50-60mv is typical voltage float on ground. I have never measured a true ...


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Typically, LED lights are Diodes which are sensitive to polarity (+ vs -) you can blow them if you connect incorrectly or if you over-power the circuit. Other than that, a LED strip is typically quite robust. My guess is that the power source has blown, (since the leds will require a DC input. You can check this by connecting a 12v battery directly to the ...


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I cannot see it being able to be done. Theres just not enough wires. Basically whats missing is after you get your switched power to your light you need a path back to the main (source) neutral. Or any neutral really. You do have white wires in the 3 way switch boxed but they are acting as travellers and not neutrals. Sorry for your bum luck. I hate being ...


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Your PIR light needs a constant power source, a neutral and a ground. If you would like to "steal" power from an existing interior ceiling light?.. than you would first have to make sure you have constant power into the light box, not just switched power. So it depends how your interior light was fed originally (constant power going to the switch first or ...


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Agreed that you need to verify the light is not working first by switching the light bulb with a known working light bulb. If that doesn't work is there another 3 way switch that is off now that you didn't know you had? That was switched off by somebody else since you didn't know it existed. Can this light only be turned on and off from the one location (i ...


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It looks like its a B15 bayonet base, try https://www.ecolume.co.uk see if they have one in LED.


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That will work. Code depends on where you live, but I can't see anything wrong with making the junction away from the switch. You might have issues doing all this in the fan box. It might be cleaner to put a small box in the ceiling and do your connections, then have a small run down to the fan. And be smart with placement of recessed lighting above a ...


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It's all about the watts, dude! The safety concern surrounding the use of adapters, power boards, and the like is as you mentioned: wattage. Power strip (board) safety 101: Add up the wattage of all loads (in your case, CFLs) plugged into the power strip. Look at the power strip for a wattage rating, and take four-fifths (or 80%) of it as a derating ...


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LEDs are better in almost every way other than price: LED Pros: Lower power consumption Longer bulb life, especially if the light is turned on and off frequently (which is hard on CFLs). Generally better color quality, although this varies from bulb to bulb for both LEDs and CFLs. CFLs usually have a CRI around 70-80, and LEDs are usually 80-90+. (See ...


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I would look for Stronger adhesive or Screws and suitable clips Many LED strips include adhesive tape but fitting clips may also be available. One reason adhesives fail is insufficient cleaning and preparation of the surface you want to fix something to. Generally you need smooth clean surfaces. Alcohol wipes are sometimes used to remove oily/greasy ...


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You have two options, get rid of the dimmer or try different LED bulbs. All LED bulbs hiss when on a dimmer, some bulbs hiss much louder that others. A led compatible dimmer will help reduce the amount of hiss but it will never get rid of it. Here is an article that compares a couple of different led bulbs and dimmer switches. It looks at the quality ...


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I believe this is what you are requesting: the new light must always be off when the original light is off but can optionally be turned on while the original light is on. To accomplish this you can connect the new light in parallel with the original light, but with a switch on the hot leg, like this: Or use a new light that has a built-in pull-chain, ...


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Yes. The more efficient bulb will also produce less heat, so it should be fine. The only concern is that if there is a dimmer you need a dimmable bulb, and if there is a touch switch or other circuit that was powering itself via a trickle current thru the bulb that may not work -- but neither it nor the bulb will be harmed by the experiment, so go for it.


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I think it is pretty funny people think concrete prevents rust. What causes rust is water. Guess what is inside concrete? Water. Ever seen old bridges falling apart on the highway, with the rusty rebar sticking out and all brown and the concrete cracking and falling away. You know why that is? It is because concrete has water in it, and it rusts the rebar. ...


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Your problem has been solved by science! Use a galvanic anode. Attach a block of zinc (bare metal to bare metal) torward the bottom of your pole before you bury it. The one catch is that you may have to isolate the safety ground from the pole.


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There are many options. Stainless-steel pipe would be the simplest and most direct one, given your non-concrete desire. For that matter, at 4-5" schedule 80 PVC conduit will probably work fine and never rust (it paints nicely) for somewhat less cost than stainless steel, unless this is a really tall light (seems unlikely, but you didn't say.) You'll ...


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Make sure concrete is above ground. 3-4" is usually good. This will keep standing water out. Paint metal before putting it in concrete. A metal primer and a sealant coat goes a long way. Slope concrete form away from pole on the top 1-2 inches. If you do this right the concrete at pole will be about a 1/2" taller than concrete at edges. Your pole is ...


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I found the answer! @diceless set me on the right track in looking at where the foot of the bulb is connecting to the fixture. Since it was an older fixture (installed in the 80's, I think), the hot contact (Number 1 in this diagram ) was bent down, and it was connecting with the smaller bulb but not the bigger LED bulb. With the circuit turned off at the ...


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I agree the 600 Watt is not big enough, We need a 20% buffer for continuous loads in any circuit, for example 48 va transformer with 24 volt secondary is "good" for 2 amps, however that is with zero cushion, in reality a 24 volt transformer at 48 va may sakely handle only 1.6 amps.


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One consideration is current draw. CFLs have a power factor of about 0.5, meaning they draw twice as much current as a similarly sized halogen or incandescent bulb, which have power factor of 1.0. So if your fixture is rated for a 50W halogen bulb, that means: 50 = 120*current*1.0 (Power = voltagecurrentpower factor), so the fixture is rated for 0.42 ...


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First, the 14/2 wire will need to be upgraded to 12/2 wire or you need to downgrade the breaker to 15 amps to protect that section 14/2 wire from possibly overheating/causing a fire. The vanity typically does not need to be on the GFCI but if the light/exhaust fan is close enough to the shower/tub that you can touch it (if you are not tall enough, image if ...



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