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A15 refers to the size of the glass part. The small base size is known as an E12 Candelabra base. Anything with that size, screw-in base should fit in the socket, but it has to be A15 to fit within the shade. Also, watch out for the rating or brightness of the bulb. The Harbor Breeze model ceiling fans usually say MAX 60W. So that's around 14W for CFL ...


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There are many films available to obscure glass -- frosted, patterned, etc. They are self adhering and can be fairly easily removed. They come in a variety of sizes and can be cut to size. Look for them in big box stores or window treatment stores. Images and links are examples only, not an endorsement of goods or sources


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Your problem is that the white wire that is connected to the new dimmer never actually connects to neutral -- it simply connects to the load. You'll need a white pigtail and a new wirenut to fix this. Turn the power off at the breaker. Undo the existing wirenut for the white wires, and undo the white wire from the new dimmer. Twist one end of the white ...


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Yes, that will have a big effect on it. If you're familiar with the difference between Watts and VA... that. Watts and VA normally differ when the load has poor power factor, but it could also be when the output is not sinewave and the load wants sinewave (e.g. a motor). Perhaps it is drawing the correct wattage (or VA) but your tester is misreporting ...


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Possibly - you're not screwing the bulb in tight enough. Most bulbs need to make one contact at the tip, these need to make two. But more likely these are duff fixtures. "Better Homes & Gardens" has never made a lamp in their long history publishing magazines; it's obvious they've "rented out their brand" (like Curtes Mathes of late). A quick ...


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This sounds like either malfunctions in the lamp switch itself, or the secondary (low/high) contact on the socket is coming out of adjustment i.e. failing to make solid contact with the bulb base. Try prying the contact up slightly with the lamp unplugged and seeing if that fixes it. If not -- you might as well take the lamp back and get yet another one ...


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You should not use two 3-way dimmers on the same lights. A 3-way dimmer can be used in combination with a 3-way switch, to have on/off/dim at one location and on/off at the other. But if you dim at two locations, rather than getting 0% to 100% dimming controllable from either end, you end up with a combination of the two dimmers' settings that may not make ...


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you have to remove the ballast- as most t8 tubes have an electronic one inside. If you put them in t12- you will burn the bulb up and they will work sporadically before they die. Also the fixture gets blackend. You must use non shunted lamp holders. you cant just "change the light". You put 115 volts to ONE END only- and use the black and white wire- ...


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Get a push-on wire splice. Cut a 16 inch piece of 12 gauge bare copper wire. Stick the wire in to the splice and bend it back 180 degrees like it's making a U-turn. Release the two ground wires in the box from the screws, bend them out, and push the splice on to both wires at the same time. And now you can bend your new ground wire under one of the ground ...


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The green wire does need to connect to one of the two grounding screws in the box. To completely comply with code practice, you would only place one wire under each grounding screw, but unfortunately the previous electrician has cut off the ground wires of the existing cables too short to pigtail a wire connector to them. You could try loosening the cable ...


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Two years later, I decided to fix this completely. There were 5 cables; source, 3 for a 3-way switch, and one more for remaining circuit. Whatever the previous homeowner had done was sloppy and dangerous; wires were haphazardly spliced such that a neutral was the fixture's load and another was its return, with three neutrals wired to the hot; it looked like ...


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Not really. Your option is pretty much replace the switch with a quieter one. Switches are $2 to $5. Since SE archives questions, I'll mention that some switches are loud because they are special switches rated to switch high current - in that case, don't downgrade.


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Is it mounted on wood or plywood surface? The loud snapping sound probably due to the the vibration amplification by the surface on which the rocker switch is mounted on. The very first thing you could do is try install a layer of felt or similar soft material between the contact surfaces of the switch and the wall on which its mounted on. This should ...


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When you say "LED lamp" do you mean some random thing sold in stores as a replacement for incandescent bulbs? Those are terrible "point light sources", because they go to extremes to diffuse the light like the old frosted-bulb incandescent. Precisely because one of the things people hate about LEDs is their intense single-point light. The technology is ...


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If the box is grounded, look around for a hole in the box that's tapped for a 10-32 screw. It may be on a little "hill" and already have a screw in it. Attaching a solid-core wire to this, or a wire with a spade or ring terminal, is the right way to "grab" ground off the box. I like ring terminals, they're a little harder to work with, but you can put ...


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I would trace the outline of that oval-shaped piece of your light fixture onto a piece of wood about as thick as or very slightly thicker than your mirror. Cut it out and then cut off a flat from the bottom so that it fits above your mirror over the junction box in the wall. Drill mounting holes through it so that the fixture's mounting screws pass through. ...


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This one is a huge bummer. You don't have many options here. Either cut out the box and replace it higher up, or re-mount it higher on the stud, or lower the mirror. Whether you can re-use the box depends on what kind of box it is and how it is mounted. I think moving the box is by far the easier option.


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From the looks of your updated photo, your house was wired with a 50s/60s type of NM that carried an undersized (16AWG) "ground"-but-not-really-a-ground with it. The common practice with these wires was to fold them back into or screw them to the cableclamps instead of bringing them into the box and pigtailing them to a ground screw on the box. In this ...


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This is also known as a GOBO light. That might be able to help you find more resources online, like this: http://www.instructables.com/id/Gobo-Light-Projector


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To get sharp shadow projection you need either something close to a single-point light source, or lenses


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Focusing the light requires some tinkering. The size of the hole is a factor. The distance between the light source and the apeture is another factor. Also, if you are using multiple LEDs then there will be multiple stars per hole; each LED will make a star. Some words to google might be diffraction, interferance, and apeture. Also you could perhaps pick up ...


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The cans themselves are not wet rated. You should install a fixture that is. Such as a strip light that is sealed and gasketed. Something rated for outdoors. Good luck!


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You appear to have older 14-2 without ground coming in from 4 directions, and each of those (or at least three of them) has a separate uninsulated ground alongside. If you combine them and pigtail to the box and your fixture, in theory everything will be protected.


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Agree with Kris in the earlier post. Look at one of the main wires coming through the conduit in the upper left. It looks like there's a very clearly-cut ground wire that was cut close to the entrance into the box.


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Here's my best guess at the wiring based on the photo. Looks like you've got one hot/neutral coming into the box from the panel (or another switch/outlet), and you've got 2 hot/neutrals going out of the box to other switches/outlets. Since these are all joined together, it doesn't really matter which one is coming in and which two are going out. Then it ...


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Direct sale eBay "finds" are not direct from a manufacturer, they're either factory seconds, counterfeits or built-to-be-cheap models. Even when "competing" products are offered by several "makers", they are often the same production hucked by several marketers or under several eBay aliases. In any case, they all "fell off a truck" in Shenzhen. No ...


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This is common with older security sensors. (The sensor needs a small amount of power to function. To avoid wiring a neutral wire, they are wired in series with the bulbs, and power themselves by leaking a small amount of current through the bulbs - halogen bulbs don't mind this.) The simplest solution is to replace just one of the bulbs with ...


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Cheap LED bulbs use a capacitor dropper circuit to step down the AC mains voltage to something more suitable for running LEDs -- the dropper capacitor used in them is often not a fully mains-rated type and thus vulnerable to being damaged by surges and spikes -- the resulting damage causes a loss of capacitance and would explain why your LED bulbs only glow ...


1

Judging by the specifications given for those Lights, an LED driver is not what you need. They're listed as supporting "10-30v DC Voltage", which means that they must have their own LED driver circuitry already inside them, so all you need to supply is an appropriate DC voltage in that range from a power supply which can handle the load. You are ...


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Qualifier: I live in Japan and have seen tons of those sockets. The majority of Japanese rental apartments do not have ceiling fixtures - tenants bring their own. What you have there is a standard twist-lock ceiling socket. It is designed to hold up lightweight fixtures all by itself, heavier ones hang from the nearby hook. The somewhat rusty grill beside ...


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IMHO this is a somewhat low-quality answer just a cut above link-only (which is why it was posted as a comment), and based entirely on "choose the right keywords for a search about an item I know nothing about directly." But since at least two people have requested it as an answer, here it is. I encourage anyone who actually has direct experience of these or ...


1

The LEDs do not light up (ie conduct) for a brief time after switch on. During that time there is current in the Live wire but not in the Neutral. The rcd reacts to this imbalance (residual current) by breaking the circuit. Neither the rcd nor the LED lighting system is faulty.


0

I had the same problem with my Harbor Breeze fan. I found an remote for a fan in another room and programmed it for the fan that had the dimming issue. It seems to have fixed the problem, so I'm guessing the remote is bad. You may want to double check that the remote is set to the correct bulb type (if it has this switch in the back). Also try pressing ...


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It sounds like power is fed through the ceiling... here's a look at the wiring that you should have: If you hooked it up correctly, then either the lamp, fuse, or switch is faulty.


3

Consider reinforcing the strip with self-adhesive foam weatherstrip. Stick the adhesive side to the flimsy backer strip, leaving a spongy foam surface exposed. This might be a really simple and inexpensive way to add some thickness/stability to the flimsy backer, plus give you a kind grippy non-marking/non-slip surface against the pole:


3

You can go T12, T8 or LED, and 2, 3 or 4 lamps. That is decided by which ballast you buy. Instant, or Rapid/Programmed Start. This is decided by the wiring of your fixture. Each bulb end has 2 pins because there's a small filament in each end of the bulb. Rapid or Programmed Start ballasts use both pins to preheat those filaments for an easy start and ...


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Get LED strips which already have the stick on adhesive on the back. (If you already have that then great). Then just stick it to the surface that you intend to mount the strip to. I see no advantage what so ever of installing a layer of duct tape in between. There is also a good chance that the duct tape surface is not even optimal surface for applying ...


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From the looks of your fixture, I am almost 100% certain the ballasts are electronic. These newer types of ballasts can detect bad fluorescent bulbs, and will automatically stop trying to ignite the bulb, thus, not wasting energy. Older ballasts would continue to try to ignite the bulb. There is no harm in leaving the bad bulbs in place.


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OSRAM published an exhaustive document explaining the limitations of CRI and the case with deep red. It also describes the mixing of white LEDs with amber LEDs to obtain a high-CRI (including R9) light with high emission efficiency. http://ledlight.osram-os.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/OSRAM-OS_WEBINAR_HighCRI_06-26-12.pdf


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Adding in red LEDs (usually in the range of 660-680nm wavelength) at the appropriate brightness will improve color rendering when matched with white LEDs with poor reds. However, the resulting combination will have lower electrical efficiency than just using white LEDs with a better phosphor.



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