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1

There is no way to tell what to connect to. It depends on how they wired it. I think it is safe to assume you should connect to the single black since it is in that box by itself like that. And yes, you would connect to the white and green with the other two wires. The instructions are not sparse, they show what you need to connect to. They do not know or ...


3

Warning: You'll be working with live electrical wires during this procedure. If you don't feel comfortable doing so, please contact a local licensed Electrician. Set up your multimeter (or voltmeter) to measure volts AC. Very carefully remove the caps from the white wires, making sure the wires do not come into contact with anything. Turn the switch ...


1

If photo #4 is the place you want to install the new light than wire the white wire from the new light to the two white wires and the black wire from the light to the single black wire. First attach the ground from the new light.


0

I partially agree with the answer from WarLoki. I'm concerned though. You mentioned that when you initially removed the old fixture that the black wires were wire- nutted together and the two white wires were connected to the fixture wires. This could also mean that the fixture is controlled through the Neutral line. As mentioned , get yourself a Voltage ...


0

The fastest way to check is to use a volt meter and check between the white wire on the left and the (used to be) white wire on the right you should get 120v +- between the two. Now test between the white wire and the ground and see which one gives you 120v, that should be your switch leg, power to the fixture. With that out of the way, turn off the switch ...


0

There should be no problem running 4 ceiling fans on a single 15 ampere circuit, though it will depend on what else is on the circuit. Say a 52" fan is 90-100 watts (at high speed), plus three 60 watt bulbs. That puts each fixture at 280 watts or so. Which means four of them, would be 1120 watts. A 120 volt 15 ampere circuit, can supply 1880 watts (120 ...


2

Heavily insulated can lights are a Bad, Bad thing for LED bulbs - LED bulbs are already compromised in their cooling ability by being forced to fit in an envelope that is similar in shape to an incandescent bulb. Stick it in an IC can fixture with no airflow and insulation all around, and it gets hot. Heat kills LEDs and heat also kills LED power supplies ...


-2

This maybe something for every one who is having this problems with screw in type of fixtures and this may or may not be your problem. In the socket of a can light (recessed lighting) or lamp, you have two basic parts on the inside. The socket interior, the ring of metal that makes the most connect with the lamp, is the neutral and the little metal tab, at ...


0

From experience an extra wire with a different shield color might indicate it as the "Positive" wire in a circuit (or Hot). The electrician may have been planning ahead and to save time ran the extra wire. What I would do is to pick the most likely route of the yellow wire starting from the opened junction box. I believe you said there was a spa circuit ...


1

If you tap into the existing light box: Yes There you will have the switched power and neutral. If you try to tap into the triplex running from one of the switches: NO. There you will only have the travelers and a power.


2

There are half a dozen ways one could do this, but I would do it this way Purchase 2 Lutron RF Maestros. ( The RF part is important, as they sell none RF Maestros too) ( for non dimming use MRF2-6ANS ) One Pico wireless switch One Pico switch plate adapter One 2 gang decor plate Change both switches to the RF Maestro and put the Pico next to the ...


1

Updated solution per comment: The fire alarm should not be connected to a switch at all. It's likely that it is connected to the same switch as the light but with the wires reversed. The solution would be to remove the fire alarm black & white wires from the switch and splice them in the box to the cable that feeds the switch, but before it "hits" the ...


4

According to the instructions found here, you'll have to replace the other switch with a Retractive Press Switch when using a dimmer. Important notes - for two way and multi - way installation Read General Installation Safety Instructions before starting work. Any existing 2 Way or Intermediate switches MUST be replaced with Retractive Press ...


1

This would be fine if you mount the switch in an electrical box in the wall and use it, for example, to switch the receptacle (or just half of the receptacle) that your surge suppressor or battery unit is plugged into. For instance, you could us an "old work" box to put the switch in the wall above the desk, and fish NM cable to/from the box with the ...


1

Edit For some LED strips once you cut the strip that's it. That particular brand is linkable once it has been cut. It appears to be DC as opposed to AC so the link would require the correct polarity. Looking at the product page it does not appear to show any link connectors, rather just the live ends (the part that feeds from the transformer). But that ...


3

Since the setup now is two switches to control each light (what is known as a three-way switch) the new switches need to be the same type. A simple switch that is not a "three way switch" (they will be so labeled) won't replace those. Return the simple switches and buy 3-way switches - then it will be easy to proceed.


-1

This gets into efficacy/usefulness verses efficiency and the important fact that less voltage is far more stabler. If you look closely: 12V 50W energy consumption = 53 kWh/1000h 240V 50W energy consumption = 50 kWh/1000h Thus the 240V 50W is 3kWh/1000h more efficient in energy consumption. However the 240V 50W has half the life span of the 12V 12V ...


2

In this type of set-up, all load power is controlled by the electronic motion-sensing switch. If you use the mechanical switch to "turn on" the light, the motion sensor will turn it off when no motion is detected (after a certain time period, usually selected by the user/installer). If you look at the wiring instructions for the 3-way motion-sensing in-wall ...


3

To make a true 3-way motion detector switch -- as opposed to a motion detector with a remote, or a motion detector in series with a normal switch -- the motion detector has to be able to monitor whether power is being drawn through either of the travellers and which traveller it is currently connected to. If no power is now flowing, to turn on flip to the ...


1

I just installed a Levitron 300w CFL dimmer in my newly renovated bedroom where I installed 4 recessed lights. The two CFL's dim great but the two LED 65w bulbs hum. I switched them around to make sure that it's not the switch but the bulbs that hum. After I switched out the 65w with a lower wattage the humming stopped. Make sure that all your bulb wattage ...


0

I had exactly this same need, and did -not- want to use outlets or an entire system for just two switches at a place I will probably not be in another year or two. I found what I was looking for at a local HW store recently turned A*E. The brand is "Heath Zenith", the model is BL-6133-WH (the last two letters are the color, in this case White) I believe. ...


0

You might try cutting strips of 3M adhesive Velcro, if there's a suitable place for both the hook strips and loop strips to be sufficiently concealed. Alternatively, you might be able to put something behind the 'clicking' hook so that the hook doesn't withdraw from the cover. (I'm thinking folded paper, or rubber, or foam) After that, depending on style ...


1

As long as the water is clean it will work. The main risk is that some amount of water will remain. One solution is to fill a bucket with alcohol then dunk it in the bucket. The evaporation of the alcohol will take all the water with it and make it nice and dry. You can also sit it in the bright sun for a few days.


0

All sorted now, basically I have a plastic back box but the earths have a connector on them. The Loop N terminals are for convenience, so I've just bought a connector block to connect them up. The L1 and Coms just need to have the same wiring on the new dimmer switch. I've not done it yet but got my answer from another forum.


1

I guess that some clips or other parts that make this 'click' work are not catching firmly and/or are bending as because of temperature. I would try to adjust them if possible (if these are like metal parts) to grip more firmly. If that doesn't work You can either remove these light covers and make a complain in a shop You ordered them (as it shouldn't be a ...


0

I notice that the failing bulb is next to your switch... so i'm suspecting damage from shaking the bulbs while turning them on and off. Which is a pity since I like the switch design... maybe you could redesign it as a wall-mounted switch? (I have an old gas key which I'm planning to adapt as the knob of a dimmer switch.)


1

Air Tight recessed lights might prevent air seepage from a conditioned area to a non-conditioned area, but they can't do much about thermal transfer. Proper insulation is the only way to fix large amount of thermal leakage. However, your predicament is going to be that your fixtures are not insulation-contact (IC) rated. With non-IC fixtures, you'll not ...


0

This leaflet just contains some general information concerning the product. The only thing relevant to installation is in point 5 (labeled 五). Basically, the user is told to connect what are literally labeled as the "fire wire" and "null wire" (火线 and 零线) -which I interpret as respectively the red and the black wires- to an AC supply of 180 to 250V, 50 to ...


0

These lights are not standard 110V AC lights, but use 12V bulbs. In fact, each element consists of the light fixture itself, plus the associated 110V -> 12V transformer. In any transformer, there will be some loss of energy (no transformer has 100% efficiency), so some heat loss is to be expected. Moreover, in the manufacturer's documentation it is stated ...


3

A pretty common approach is to build a small platform for the lamp to sit on, something like this This has the advantage of giving you more depth to mount a receptacle box. You can use 3/4 inch material (nominally 1x ) or larger, such as 5/4 stock. You can then cut a hole, using a hole saw through the new block and the siding underneath giving you enough ...


3

I would opt to use a 1/2 pancake box 4" in diameter. The NEC code does not permit the canopy or empty space of a fixture to substitute for cubic wire space for wires larger than #16 gauge. And a 4" pancake boxes cubic space legally can only hold one 14/2. Since you already have the wire conduit on the inside of the house I would also consider using ...


3

Not sure if it's the "approved" method, but I've seen it quite a few times (mostly for fixtures on the front of a garage). The fixture wires are fed through the hole into the box inside, where the electrical connections are made by approved means. Then the fixture is simply mounted directly to the wall, typically with a gasket between the fixture base and ...



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