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You might want to look at OpenMotics, an open source home automation system: https://www.openmotics.com. Note: I'm one of the developers at OpenMotics.


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In the US you could buy a "Medium Base Polarized Socket Outlet Adapter" at any hardware store for a couple bucks. I suppose both ends are different where you are, but perhaps the picture will be enough to convey the idea?


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I'd agree with Keshlam, ask the local inspector about that specifically. It sounds to me like you don't plan on taking out a permit, which I would probably recommend, it gives you peace of mind knowing the job is done right, it's not very expensive, and you can tell the future homeowner when you sell that it was inspected and done to code. As for circuit ...


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After a little research I discovered that most dimmer switches are "Leading Edge" dimmer switches and that these aren't compatible with LED bulbs and will result in a flicker and reduce the lifetime of the bulbs. So what I needed was a "Trailing Edge" dimmer switch which I struggled to find in the shops but managed to order online. It was quite a lot more ...


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No, not without running new wire. The way you have it there is only one switch leg going up to the fan/light.


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Some dimmers (and other "smart" switches), require a grounding conductor to function. If there's an open ground, the receptacles will function normally, but the dimmer may not. To test this theory, replace the dimmer with a standard snap switch. If the lights work with the new switch, the problem was an open ground. Find the break in the grounding ...


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Time to break out the multi-meter. You can safely assume the two black wires from the switch are interchangeable. But the white wires from the lamp sockets are not. Cut that blog off that connects the two and test each side. The outer metal ring needs to be the neutral and the center tab the hot. Use the multi-meter to see which wire has continuance ...


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Almost certainly was meant to be wired with hot to the two blacks, which run through the switch, and then the neutral to the two unbound whites. But a several commenters said there are a number of concerns with what you show: Scorch marks A missing insulating sleeve for one of the bulb sockets No clear ground connection, unless that's what the other two ...


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I've done this. I have a great solution. Simply take the hot circuit to the sensor and to the light switch and run them in parallel. The only downfall is that you won't be able to turn the light off when the sensor has control. But I haven't found this to be a problem.


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Yes there is no problem doing this.


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There are LED tubes marketed as physical replacements for fluorescent tubes. (I was recently pricing ones in the T8 size). However, the ones I have seen require rewiring the fixture.


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what specifications do I seek? Color "temperature" in Kelvins. (~3000K for "warm", ~6000K for "daylight") Light output1 in Lumens. (e.g. 6' 70W T8 fluorescent = ~4500 Lm) If you are really serious you'd probably have to obtain the luminous intensity and calculate illuminance but, unless you are an architect, or similar, you would find this overkill. ...


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You should re-feed this fan from a lighting circuit or other 15A circuit. A ceiling fan CANNOT be supplied from a kitchen or DR receptacle circuit. Whoever did this was clueless with regard to codes and proper wiring.



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