New answers tagged

0

Power bumps can cause them to turn on also spiders. There are models that have better circuitry not to trigger for small power bumps and some have sensitivity adjustments these are the 2 nuisance issues I have found.


2

It's either an intentional product feature (i.e. To serve as a night light) or an ...unintentional bug which would require really exceptionally bad design. If this is a quality premium unit, I would expect the former; if it's a bargain priced thing from China perhaps the latter. But it would be really unusual for a product defect to leave a tiny bit of ...


1

There is always some fine print. I don't know if this is the light that you purchased, but it has the exact wording, so I'll show it as the example. The line in question means that they are surface mountable up to that level of light output (since they produce more heat.)


1

High output fluorescent lights do generate a fair amount of heat. If directly attached to a solid surface the ballast will over heat and may turn off to cool down. The life of the light will be reduced due to the high heat. I always use 12 gauge single jack chain for mounting the 6 tube enclosed fixtures. I do have 5 or 6, 4 tube open fixtures that are ...


3

Assume we have 6 switches (S1-S6) and 5 lamps (L1-L5) -- also assume that we don't want any lights in the stairs on when the stairs are not in use by anyone (even if there's someone on top of the tower), and that someone walking up the final flight of stairs doesn't want the light below them on. Finally, we can assume that nobody's flipping light switches ...


4

As Wolf says, a combination of SPDT and DPDT switches. One switch on each floor, top and bottom are SPDT, all others are DPDT. The number of switches is one more than the number of lights. Here are a couple of ways to wire it: The left diagram shows the sane way. Blue is the neutral leg. The right diagram shows how to use the Carter three-way pattern to ...


0

Sounds like 3-way switches. Two of them, ganged together so they throw on the same physical switch handle. It's like a single 3-way is SPDT, 2 ganged 3-ways is DPDT. So, 1st floor lighting controlled by 1st floor and 2nd floor. 2nd floor lighting controlled by 1st floor and 3rd floor. 3rd floor: 2nd and 4th. Etc.


1

First, just to prevent any confusion, it's a "3-way" switch setup, not 2-way. 3-way switches take power in (or let it out) through a singular wire, which then is switched between two 'traveler' wires. It's referred to as a 3-way switch for the same reason as a 3-way intersection - there are 3 paths in/out of the switch. Next, you need to ensure that the ...


2

I gather this is an expensive, quality fixture that uses dual T5 bulbs, and it has an electronic rapid start or progammed start ballast (that is to say, there's a small time delay before it comes on). All fluorescents are discharge lights (like neon, mercury vapor, sodium and metal halide). They all work by putting high voltage between the ends of the ...


0

also those NON-contact voltage detectors are all different, even identical model/brand. i've always found that alot of them detect voltage from 1-inch and greater distances. i've gotten lucky with a pair of Klien ones that won't detect until your actually touching the wires insulation. i recently bought a really nice looking one with a vibration motor and ...


1

Turn off power to the light before doing the following, you may want to turn off the light circuit at your main electrical distribution board for extra safety: Check the bulb is seated firmly, for a screw-in light bulb, unscrew it, visually check the base of the bulb and the socket are clean, re-insert the bulb tightly. Turn it on and see if it is improved. ...


2

Difficulty starting is a symptom of worn-out fluorescent tubes. They have a finite lifetime. Some might die after a couple of years regular use, some from the same batch might last ten or more years. See if the tube is slightly darker near one end. Either Change the starter (only on older fittings), or Change the tube Or Replace the fitting with a LED ...


1

Thanks for the update. First, you have raw smarts but you are scattered, not able to describe what you want succinctly - and you seem to have no knowledge of code electrical, this stuff can kill you and burn your house down (with the lemons). You need to learn its pecularities (there are many) before you attempt to homebrew anything like this. Like I say, ...


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It is an OR device; not an XOR device. Direct connections to do this are a bad idea and I assume prohibited by code. An automatic transfer switch might work if this usage meets manufacturer specs and is allowed by code in your jurisdiction, but it is expensive just for this. I question whether it would be allowed by code and strongly suggest checking with ...


1

Four-wire is used for "two-way" circuits, and for cases where two circuits are running to the same place (independent control of a ceiling fan and its lights, for example). In the US color coding conventions, red is the "second hot" needed for these applications.


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I have been told by an engineer who designs these, that an inductive inrush current on the line conductor can and will trip the receptacle, it just depends upon the magnitude and time duration of the event. The newer production units are much faster than the older ones and monitor all 3 wired connections. This does apply to a transformer or in your case a ...


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The california building code ironically is making it harder to use efficient environmentally friendly bulbs. Where I would normally buy standard E26 base LED bulbs, my new fixture requires GU24 and comes with CFLs with this base. Now I have to get an adaptor back to the standard E26 bases, just to use the LED bulbs the mandate was supposed to encourage me ...


3

Am I allowed to add new sockets onto lighting circuit nowadays? Yes. Do I need to worry about lighting per square foot? Other than for your own personal preference since it's your own home, not really. Overloading the lights - well I only use LED lights, but someone in the future might stick something else in, right? What do I tell the ...


-1

Many RAB outdoor LED fixtures can benefit by filling the gooseneck, esp if upside down, (Manf. requirement in that case.) Most problem free installs use a round box, recessed, with the gaskets or other suitable method to shed water and limit air infiltration.


0

It appears that the light comes in 12", 15", or 20". I know the upsizes aren't ideal, but it might be an option as well as the side view (see C dimension) shows that there is still a lip between the housing and the diffuser which could mean that the housing itself might not cover the hole. Is there any existing electrical box holding the light up? As long ...


2

Replacing that light seems like a solid plan, but I think you still need to repair the sheetrock and put in a standard ceiling electrical box. The hard part of drywall repair is taping the seams and floating, texturing, etc. The good news is that you don't need to do any of that. Do the absolute minimum job of replacing the square of drywall and cut a new ...


2

Something is super fishy here, LED's usually require a bit more than 1V especially the "lighting" ones. There are no "Bulbs" in LED's. LED's have very very long lifespans. I don't know LED's failure mode, but I don't think it's usually "getting dim" I think they usually just "go out". I think the SMPS might actually be bad, which I'm sure is built into the ...


0

Short answers: Will this even work? Yes, but it'll probably be worse than what you have now in terms of brightness. Will the lights just be dimmer... Yes, they will. ...or would the transformer overwork itself? No, a transformer is internally set at what ratio to step down the main voltage coming into it. It will always produce the same ...


2

Short answer: No There may be a way to redesign the circuitry but you are better off, in almost every case, to find replacement lights equivelant to what you are replacing.


0

I realize this is old, but I want to share my experience with these fixtures. They make conversion kits, but I couldn't find one large enough to cover the old 14" square fixture. I made my own conversion kit out of a 16" wood circle with a ceiling electrical box mounted in the center. I removed the old socket and hardware from the recessed box. There was ...


1

The simple answer is: yes, a box is required. Any electrical splices and connections must be enclosed appropriately and grounded if metal.


3

There are instance where this is possible and legal, such as bathroom vanity bar type lights with an integral and complete back plate. Other than that a box is absolutely mandatory. Here is a good example. Imagine these fixtures flush against the wall.


0

From your description the wiring is normal not "jerry rigged". You can add a new wire to the switch but from the wire count you may not be able to fit everything back in the box and your wire fill would exceed code. It may be better to purchase a 2 gang old work box cut the hole the right size for the box pull the old box and install the new 2 gang box. It ...


3

Based on your description, this would be the wiring setup. The yellow 'smudges' are wire nuts and the black ones are re-identified wires, grounds are not shown. Power coming in with /2, feeding down to the switch box with /3, and then going over to the secondary light with /2. I'm only showing this based on perhaps if you're trying to reuse existing wiring ...


0

I assume you want to control both fixtures separately, since you said "2 gang switches". Not with a single 14/3, you can't. A 12/4 would do the job. Leaving grounds and neutrals out of the discussion: you need a black for your always-hot down to the switches, the red for the switched hot back to fixture #1. To control fixture #2, you need a third "hot" ...


1

The issue you see is not the LED component itself that has specs to be a "flickering candidate". It is instead related to how the component is designed into the product. There are three main reasons you will see flickering. Many times if a product has many LEDs the circuitry inside (these days almost always a microcontroller) will reduce the number of ...


1

Is there something hidden in the numbers of watt, lumen, or something which might gives a hint whether an LED flickers or not? No. Flicker of LED based lamps is dependent on technical details of the implementation of the driver electronics. Any flickering LED won't flicker if driven with a continuous stable regulated DC current.


6

It is perfectly normal for it to be warm. If it's HOT, you might be over capacity. If there is more than one dimmer in a single box, you generally need to snap off the fins on the side(s) to get them to fit. With less heat sink surface area, they can't dissipate the heat as well, so the capacity is reduced. This is known as "de-rating." In a nutshell, a ...


0

Too bad I haven't updated answer when I rewired everything - but better late, then never, right? Here are the answers to my questions: White wire is neutral in US in most cases... so it was in my case. Basically, two whites were neutrals for two different circuits. I bought Voltage detector and separated right white wire by turning off circuit for lights - ...


0

The other answers do a decent job of explaining the math behind figuring this out. However, there are assumptions being made that may not be completely correct regarding the actual watt-hour usage of an LED lamp. Incandescent light bulbs are purely resistive, and therefore the voltage and current waveforms passing through them are in phase with each other, ...


9

If this was a normal switch, I would say, no this is not normal. Since the switch does contain a dimmer, it is perfectly normal. Dimmers are electronic devices that do heat up. In fact, because of the heat they create, dimmers are rated for a maximum wattage. Special high wattage dimmers are available, and they even have integrated heat sinks to help ...


0

I would say no, you should not be concerned about the operating temperature if the switches are only warm. It is normal for electricity to heat things like wires and switches that it is squeezed through. It always will to some degree. If you touch the prongs on the plug of a powerful vacuum after using for a little while they will likely be uncomfortably hot ...


-4

My wife had five LED timed lights installed in the front garden to light up our home at night, until 1 AM. She reports that the electricity bill is virtually unchanged. So I installed "Bioluz" LED A19" bulbs throughout my home ($4.67 each in a 6-pack from Amazon), and my quarterly bill has noticeably dropped. The 60 w equivalent bulbs are said to last 10,000 ...


0

EDITED: Now that you've posted a picture... ;-) Still test to confirm this, but it looks to me as if: The 2 blacks and 1 white that are connected, are feeding power through the light box to downstream outlets and also sending power to the switch (on the white wire). Wrap the end of this white wire with black tape or mark it with a black permanent marker. ...


1

While most people can make educated guesses about what the coloring means on electrical wires, I would suggest using a multimeter to actually test the wires and through a process of elimination, determine your live wire, the return, and ground wires. Too many ceiling boxes are wired oddly to have confidence in guesses based on wire color. The live wire ...


9

You will probably save money, but you have omitted several key pieces of information: What is the actual wattage of the bulbs? It's probably around 8-12 watts per bulb for a newer LED but it is easy to verify. How many hours will you save by using a timer? How many timers would you need to buy / how much do they cost? How much do you pay for electricity? ...


1

CList gave the answer you're probably looking for and it was a great answer. (About $13 on your monthly bill to run them full time - so $6 savings per month) I'll just add one thing however. It's NEVER cheaper to leave your lights on. Any amount of time that your lights are on, you're paying for it. What it comes down to, is how long you're willing to wait ...


25

a "60W replacement" LED is usually around 10W actual. 10W * 12bulbs * 24 hours = 2880Watt-hours 2880Watt-hours = 2.88 kilowatt-hours Your electric bill shows the price / kilowatt-hour. For me, with all applicable taxes and stuff, it's about $0.145 / kilowatt hour (I just paid my bill, so I have it right here)... yeah, that's 14.5 CENTS. So every 24 ...


1

The LED bulb packaging should list the power rating of the bulb like 10W or 5W or something. Once you know how much energy the bulb uses, it's a simple math problem of (X Watts * Y Hours) / 1000 = XY KW Hours. Then, from your electric bill you should be able to find a KW Hour price that you pay (say, 15 cents). Multiply the KW Hours used by the price you ...


0

If you want to be a "Maker", you could use low-voltge LED strips which have rows of LEDs on a flexible strip about 3/8” wide and backed with sticky-tape. They only emit about 140-180 degrees, but you could stick them to both sides of a strip of aluminum or fiberboard shoved up inside a transparent or translucent (fogged) pipe. That would give near 360 degree ...


1

That type of bulb just snaps in and out with a little pressure. It probably broke because the UV light had weakened the plastic, or because it force was applied in a sideways direction. To remove it, turn off the light via the switch or circuit breaker. Grab the remaining plastic with a needle-nose plier and pull it straight outward. Do not twist or tilt ...


3

I have seen this done. There is no special trim. Steps: Install trim Take a utility knife and scribe around the trim exactly. take out enough drywall layer to set trim - some guys just take off the paper mud and sand where needed after reinstalling flush trim Does it look better? Debatable. Is it worth it? Almost in all cases no. Note: My opinion ...


2

One thing the trim does typically is hide the edge of the drywall which usually, one would not want to look at because it's rough and ugly. It's hard to imagine trim that doesn't extend (at least the thickness of the metal itself) below the surface of the ceiling. If you want a trimless look, what you will probably need to do is apply drywall compound up ...


1

"Gx53 LED Light Bulb 110 Volts 5 Watts Warm White with Lamp Base for Ceiling Downlight Under Counter Lighting (5 Watts)" These are available through Amazon and can be hard wired directly into your existing wiring with individual switches if necessary. Voltage transformers are only another unnecessary weak link you can do without.


1

These are currently available:- "Gx53 LED Light Bulb 110 Volts 5 Watts Warm White with Lamp Base for Ceiling Downlight Under Counter Lighting (5 Watts)" and will hardwire directly into your existing 120V wiring. It also removes the requirement for AC/DC transformers which are just another link for failure.



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