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I think it is pretty funny people think concrete prevents rust. What causes rust is water. Guess what is inside concrete? Water. Ever seen old bridges falling apart on the highway, with the rusty rebar sticking out and all brown and the concrete cracking and falling away. You know why that is? It is because concrete has water in it, and it rusts the rebar. ...


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Your problem has been solved by science! Use a galvanic anode. Attach a block of zinc (bare metal to bare metal) torward the bottom of your pole before you bury it. The one catch is that you may have to isolate the safety ground from the pole.


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There are many options. Stainless-steel pipe would be the simplest and most direct one, given your non-concrete desire. For that matter, at 4-5" schedule 80 PVC conduit will probably work fine and never rust (it paints nicely) for somewhat less cost than stainless steel, unless this is a really tall light (seems unlikely, but you didn't say.) You'll ...


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Make sure concrete is above ground. 3-4" is usually good. This will keep standing water out. Paint metal before putting it in concrete. A metal primer and a sealant coat goes a long way. Slope concrete form away from pole on the top 1-2 inches. If you do this right the concrete at pole will be about a 1/2" taller than concrete at edges. Your pole is ...


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I found the answer! @diceless set me on the right track in looking at where the foot of the bulb is connecting to the fixture. Since it was an older fixture (installed in the 80's, I think), the hot contact (Number 3 in this diagram ) was bent down, and it was connecting with the smaller bulb but not the bigger LED bulb. With the circuit turned off at the ...


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I agree the 600 Watt is not big enough, We need a 20% buffer for continuous loads in any circuit, for example 48 va transformer with 24 volt secondary is "good" for 2 amps, however that is with zero cushion, in reality a 24 volt transformer at 48 va may sakely handle only 1.6 amps.


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One consideration is current draw. CFLs have a power factor of about 0.5, meaning they draw twice as much current as a similarly sized halogen or incandescent bulb, which have power factor of 1.0. So if your fixture is rated for a 50W halogen bulb, that means: 50 = 120*current*1.0 (Power = voltagecurrentpower factor), so the fixture is rated for 0.42 ...


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First, the 14/2 wire will need to be upgraded to 12/2 wire or you need to downgrade the breaker to 15 amps to protect that section 14/2 wire from possibly overheating/causing a fire. The vanity typically does not need to be on the GFCI but if the light/exhaust fan is close enough to the shower/tub that you can touch it (if you are not tall enough, image if ...


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1.5 wire needs to be protected by a 16 Amp (or weaker) breaker. You are fine on that front. Your total wattage will be 10*40W*2 = 800W; on a 220V line this will mean 800W / 220V = 3.6 Amps. So overload is not an issue assuming there is nothing else on that breaker. (If there is then add the wattage to the 800W and divide again) You should also extend the ...


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Yes, you're looking for lights with a high lumen output. Since LED/CFL bulbs don't convert heat to light, the wattage isn't directly proportional to the light output. As an extreme example, consider that a 2 watt laser is powerful enough to burn some materials, or blind you! What you'll likely find is that more expensive LED bulbs from lighting specialty ...


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For older types of fitting, it might be a fluorescent starter continuously attempting to start a dead tube. If so, removing the starter would stop the noise.


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Skylights are pleasing because they fill the room with light which is reflected and diffused off all the surfaces in the room, whereas a typical ceiling lamp is somewhat unidirectional and lights the ceiling almost as much (or possibly more) than the room itself. Uplighting from multiple sources is definitely a good solution for recreating the skylight ...


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The light is designed to dissipate heat through the top of the housing. If you have the ability check to make sure the top of the housing is able to get airflow. CFL and LED lights will help your situation as they do not produce as much heat.


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Yes. Outlets are rated for current draw (wattage) not brightness. If you have a more efficient bulb, the outlet doesn't know or care.


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In my slightly frightening experiences, No you can't put a regular Or dimmable LED bulb in a 3 way lamp socket. I've tried it with two different bulbs from Osram Sylvania that claim they are dimmable. The first one shot lots of sparks and fire upwards and scared me. I tried it in another 3 way lamp (not too scared, just dumb?) socket and it did it again to ...


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The only product that I know of that will do what you want is the Lutron Maestro Light/Fan control. This product consists of a switch and canopy module. The switch will digitally talk to the canopy module over the single ungrounded wire and control lights/fan separately. The kits are one switch and one module but the switch can talk to 4 modules at once.


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You could install remote modules in each fixture, however, since there's only a single ungrounded conductor your options are limited. The easiest option might be to install the remote modules, and allow them to completely control each fixture. In this setup, the wall switch will turn everything on and off as before. But when the switch is on, the remotes ...


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Instead of trying to make one large panel to charge multiple lights, just hook up one panel to one light. Sure, that will require more wire but then you don't have to worry about messing with the charging systems. A better idea might be to just forget about solar lighting and get a mains-powered garden lighting kit. These kits include a transformer and low ...


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The easiest-to-install solution to your issues is a length of 14/3 run in surface raceway and used as a switch loop. You'll want a circular raceway box at the light fixture, and a single gang raceway box at the switch, by the way. (Also note that the non-metallic raceway recommended by dfife's answer won't work here -- Legrand, for some reason, doesn't ...


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This is likely due to vibration from the motor -- try a hard-service or "fan service" light bulb; LED replacement bulbs may also be a better choice than regular incandescent or CFL bulbs in this application.


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If you have attic access you can drill into the wall cavities from above and fish cable down to the fixture and to a new switch. For the switch, you'd use an "old work" electrical box, like the ones with tabs that open up and clamp against the back of the sheetrock (or lathe and plaster) when you tighten them.


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Good question. There's a couple of options you have (if I understand your question correctly): Tap into a power source (e.g., a receptacle), run the wire (typically behind the walls) to a switch, then run wire from the switch to the fixture. This is the standard approach (but may require an electrician). (See how-to-wire-it for examples of how to run the ...


1

I determined that my power source was no good. I don't know exactly what is going on, but it seems to be coming from a switched outlet system in another part of the house. Easiest solution, tie up the old power source and find a different one that is cleaner. I found another circuit nearby that was barely used and is actually more spatially related to ...


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They should use the fluorescent and leave it on if they both are going to use the bathroom within a few minutes of each other. the energy cost of turning it off and on is saved within a few seconds. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/when-turn-your-lights


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I've had the pleasure of demolishing several printing companies (go figure), from which I'd made-off with the cool guy lights; 4' and 8' florescent red, yellow and black lights. An apartment I lived in for years had the perfect spot for the yellow ones. Atop the upper kitchen cabinets and hidden by the crown molding. I had 3 shop lights spanning the entire ...


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This is a classical symptom of cross-circuit false-tripping due to the ballast causing EMI with breaker electronics. I'd try replacing the breaker and ballast first; if that doesn't cure the problem, then there's likely a subtly faulty connection somewhere that's causing RF-rectification EMI.


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I'm going to leave minimal for someone else and answer smart.... Put the lights on their own 15A breaker. Put receptacles on a couple of 20 amp breakers. If you MUST share (or think you must) put half the lights and some receptacles on one circuit (probably 15 amp unless you really want to run 12 gauge to lights) and half the lights and some other ...


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A Non Contact Voltage Detector doesn't replace the need for a Voltmeter but it is an item I keep in my pocket as a quick verification of AC Power. If I cut the power, I'll do a quick test before I go into a wall box to make sure it is cut. If it indicates power when I don't expect it, I will use the volt meter at time to see what it is. I do get a ...


1

This is a single pole switch, so you should follow the single pole instructions in the installation guide. Notes: While you could remove the red twist-on wire connector, and use it to connect the black wire from the switch to the other wires. There's no reason to disturb the wires if you don't have to (and you don't have to). Just use the twist-on wire ...


2

It matters which one you replace, because that will determine which type of timer you need. One of those switches is going to be the "middle" switch, between the other two circuit-wise. That middle switch is a four-way switch, the two outside switches are three-way switches. You can determine which is which visually is you don't know the circuit layout - the ...


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Even after applying pressure no spring seemed to give sufficiently. It turns out that this fixture is setup so there isn't as much clearance as I would have expected. A little pulling and the bulb came out.


10

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.



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