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4

Disclaimer: while this did work, and the insides look as if they're designed for something like this, I'm not sure if it was the exact correct intended approach. Follow these steps at own risk! Based on Tester101 and Ed Beal's suggestions I tried pushing the ends. I think it was spring-loaded at both ends - by firmly but gently pushing the holder on one ...


3

This symptom is impossible without silicon electronics being involved in the delivery of power. Passive wires and windings are not capable of causing this. Common problems are common, and my first take is usually correct - a series connected old-style smart device. But Carl Witthoft has an interesting theory: these are probably low voltage bulbs. We know ...


2

The simplest thing to do is to turn the breaker on and figure out which black wire is supplying the current. (This is arguably one of the more dangerous approaches, but it is safe if you follow precautions like have someone guarding the wires so they are not touched while the power is on.) Use a multimeter and test the voltage between the ground wire and ...


2

The Tospo is a cheap Chinese ballast. To find ballasts, start with what bulbs will fit in the fixture (all the better if you have a bulb already). Then search for ballasts meant to drive that bulb (which also fit in your fixture). I think I see several on 1000bulbs.com in the $20 range. LED strips really, really do not like to bend on the flat side. ...


1

I think ThreePhaseEel and A.I. Berveleri have figured this out. That circuit was originally wired for a light only, with a 12/2 cable going up there - hot (black), neutral (white) and ground. Somebody added the fan later on, and they cheated. They used ground for neutral. They used black for the fan and white for the light. First, mark your wires. ...


1

According to any number of help pages, e.g. this one, MR16 sockets and bulbs are designed for 5 to 24 V operation. It's highly likely that's what you've got here. So the question becomes: what is your current operating voltage, and what is the voltage requirement for the LED bulbs you bought? If there's a mismatch, that's why things don't work.


1

The most common transformer-less LED lights are christmas tree (fairy) lights. They aren't designed for high light output, and typically don't have color control meant for room lighting. You could buy separate strings of red, green, and blue Christmas lights, but they wouldn't be easy to control if you're interested in color control. I'd suggest using ...


1

I am guessing that if you apply a meter you will find that the single black and white on the right address power coming into this switch box, and the wires on the left run to the lights. If so the switch installs between the left black and the right blacks, to interrupt the hot line, the whites are all tied together to provide the neutral connection (as ...


1

Short answer: Yes How much do you know about electricity? First off, get the data sheet for the ballast you want to troubleshoot. You will have to test for voltage between the pins on the ends of the lamps and then from one end to the other to see if it matches the rating of the ballast. If it is an electronic ballast it will be more complicated than an ...


1

Thing is, if you replace a ballast it is always best practice to replace the lamps as well. With older magnetic T-12 ballasts the lamps will go out in pairs, even if one lamp is still good, so troubleshooting can be annoying. With T-8 electronic ballasts lamps go out individually. If all the lamps go out at the same time, or are even just all out, it is ...


1

Yes if they don't light and the ends of the bulbs are black you just found 1 answer the bulb is bad. If you replace the bulb and still have trouble your problem is the ballast, electronic ballast die when overloaded. I almost left a sarcastic note at the end of this but will explain. After just changing 3 ballast in very high end fixtures that the owner was ...



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