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6

Personally I always go up a size in dimmer if I am that close to the limit. If it is ganged with other dimmers then derating forces you to. Will it work, absolutely. Will it fail sooner at that high of a load, most likely. Will it get very hot, definitely. Will it be dangerous, no, not really.


6

This depends on the manufacturer's statements. Typically switch devices are rated for their expected normal device load. Wiring heat loss, etc. should be negligible enough to ignore. Here's what one manufacturer said on their website: Electronic low-voltage transformers also dissipate some heat. These inefficiencies are small enough to be accounted for ...


3

Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


3

I believe that the electrical connection you are seeing is from the ballast ( the thing that Makes the fluorescent tube light) that is wired into the other metal box part of the Can. You would need to remove that ballast to put in another type of light in. It would be in the little panel that opens up that I can see in the 2nd Picture. In that box there ...


3

Although you'll probably get away with it, it's not a good idea. The 85W lamp rating is probably worse than 10% accurate, so you could easily go over the 600W. I advise you to remove one light or get a more powerful dimmer.


2

If a dimmer switch is rated for 600 watts it will handle 600 watts. Most would actually handle well over 600 watts but would (supposedly) fail quicker. I don't see the concern at all. Your worry should be in the product not you failing to follow the directions. If this doesn't ease your mind you will need to call the manufacturer. [Although I can't see ...


2

There are several factors at work here, all of which make 600 watts of incandescent lighting require a 1000+ watt dimmer: Most dimmers people choose (initially) are as cheaply made as possible. It might handle the rated load, but not for long. Since it is a dimmer, there is a probability that it will not be set to 100% all the time. An 80% (of fully on) ...


2

You can get a remotely controlled wall switch. This comes in 2 parts. One is a switch that replaces your current indoor switch. The other is a remote control unit that wirelessly controls the switch. This approach does not require any additional wiring indoors or out. Just google "remote controlled wall switch" to see the various options available.


2

Without knowing exactly what you've got going on, it's impossible to say for sure what you have to do. It's totally possible that there are no "neutrals" in the box at all, depending on when the house was wired (and by whom). Here's what the schematic should look like... Basically, any wire that comes "after" a load, and creates a low resistance path ...


2

No, such an arrangement will either flat out not work, or have very poor reliability. The motion detector logic requires full uninterrupted voltage and a dimmer switch is going to inject noise into the power which will disrupt the motion logic or its sensor. Additionally, even if the motion sensor continued to work, the cycling of the light on and off ...


2

I'm not certain what you mean by "voltage stabilizer", but I'm assuming you mean something like this Automatic Voltage Regulator from APC or Line Conditioner / AVR from Tripp Lite (or maybe a larger industrial model if you're powering an entire showroom) These devices will automatically step up or step down the voltage with in a limited range of input ...


2

As far as I know a UPS is a voltage stabilizer but with a backup battery and a voltage stabilizer is a UPS without a backup battery. As such their ability to handle voltage fluctuation depends more on their specific design than whether or not they have battery backup.


1

Presumably the black and red wires are the hot and switched, corresponding to your current switch. If the box is gounded, that one's good. The issue (depending how the box is wired) may be that the timer needs a neutral connection, and if the box only has "switch loops" run to it it may not currently HAVE a neutral wire - in which case you need to get one ...


1

You would be best advised to shut off all live power feed to this box. Then pull the existing bare copper GND wires out of the back of the box and add an additional bare copper wire pigtail to the bunch. Then reattach to the box with the proper green grounding screw. The new pigtail will get wire nutted to the green wire on your new dimmer switch using an ...


1

I'm in same boat. When I redid the house I'm in, I installed as much LED lighting as I could and the rest is halogen. What I've learned is, dimming range is based completely on the driver in the LED bulb. And most LED bulbs will only dim to about 20-30% of there maximum. I'm sure you know how dimmers work, but for those that don't it is basically a ...


1

That's not how it works. Unlike incandescent bulbs, florescent bulbs do not draw a particular amount of power - they are rated to handle a particular amount of power. They are actually "negative resistance" devices - which basically means they will draw an infinite amount of power if you let them. (Specifically: The more current that goes into them the ...


1

Hmm, new here, so can't comment... this isn't really an answer but a bit of a "me too!". We have the same issue (totally random failure mode), and I'm considering led retrofit replacements (~20 bucks a pop, versus at least that for new ballasts which wouldn't be a guaranteed fix). However, the unbalanced load has me thinking that I should go up into the ...


1

Fluorescent fixtures can be rather tricky. With that many installed on the same circuit, what you might be seeing is an unbalanced load on the circuit, causing some of the fixtures to have full current and others, less, and quite simply a ballast, or any fluorescent will not work without full current. With the warm up times of older ballasts, combined with ...


1

For incsndescent bulbs, usually the opposite. -- a 100W incandescent bulb puts out more light than two 50W bulbs. Though as a single source, shadows may be more of a problem. Not sure about fluorescents. LEDs are probably closer to a linear relationship between wattage and lumens.


1

If you got the halos at big box just go back and ask them to find compatible connectors and snip your LED connectors off. I would do it this way so that you can reuse for other light kits. Note: The connectors are proprietary HALO. I suggest contacting them and saying that you have messed a few up from their light kit and recessed housing. The might send ...


1

In my experience with SCRs or TRIACs (The "chip" dimmers usually use), the wattage rating is under "perfect" conditions (i.e. the area where the device is mounted says at "room temperature"). Now hopefully because they are in a commercial device they have been de-rated appropriately, but I have seen more than a few devices where the chip spec's were copied ...


1

Would you try a motion sensor inside the closet rather than a jamp switch? That would allow the bypass sliders to close either way, and the light would go off after a certain time whether the doors were tightly closed or not. The motion sensor would trigger when one reached in to the closet, but getting it to come on reliably might be a bit finicky.



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