Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

A parallel circuit is what you're referring to. In a series circuit, if one connection is broken, the entire circuit is broken.


3

Which country, Michael? USA, by any chance, judging from your jargon? If so... I think you may have a grounding issue at the panel or at the line coming in from the pole. I've seen similar issues, and issues with lights burning EXTREMELY brightly for a short while before they burn out, from just such grounding issues. Especially if the AC and the 1st-floor ...


3

As long as the wiring is copper, there should be no problem using the screw terminals. If you're in the US, black (hot) to brass, white (neutral) to silver.


2

I would use a pigtail (short piece of wire) between the building wiring and the socket, attached with a wire nut. The reason is pretty simple - every time you replace the socket you probably need to cut off and restrip the end of the wire. Eventually that wire gets so short that its difficult or impossible to attach the socket to. If you use the wire nuts ...


2

I WOULD NOT attach the building wiring directly to the socket. I would use some #16 or #18ga stranded leads from the socket. There needs to be some flexibility between the socket and the house wiring since even something as simple as changing lamps will move the socket around a bit, as well as expansion and contraction from the extreme heat generated by ...


2

The easiest option would be to run a new cable directly from the switch, up to the ceiling fixture. You'll want to either install a larger box and a new switch, or a double switch, so the light can be controlled independently. If you're working in a home constructed of solid wood framing, you should be able to run the new cable fairly easily. Since you ...


2

Depending on the condition of the floor above your ceiling, it might be easier and cheaper to access the ceiling void through the floor. For example, if the floor upstairs is going to be renovated too, or if the floor cover is a carpet, which can be lifted and put back easily, or even better - if it is just the original floorboards, you can easily lift one ...


2

First, never notch the bottom of beams. All electrical runs should be in the center third of any timber. This is for structural support as well as protecting the electrical. If you want to keep the wall outlet switched, consider knocking out the current one gang and replace with old work two gang. Run a new line up the wall, through the top plate into ...


2

Almost certainly the ballast, unless old enough to actually have a separate starter, at which point it becomes a tossup between ballast and starter - probably not from 1992. But a 1992 ballast is certainly ripe for replacement 22 years later. They don't live forever. I have a few older ones I have not gotten around to replacing that are very ...


2

I sounds like the problem might be that the right side of your service panel either isn't connected to the main at all or has a really bad connection. I'm guessing what is happening is that when the A/C is "on", it is back feeding the right side of your panel through the breaker. This could also explain why your A/C compressor isn't working - it would be ...


2

According to the National Electrical Code, you can replace the fixture without a ground as long as the outlet is GFCI protected. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 410 Luminaires, Lampholders, and Lamps V. Grounding 410.44 Methods of Grounding Luminaires and equipment shall be mechanically ...


1

If you can get enough access to install a BX connector on that armored cable, and if you can establish that the armor is actually a good protective ground (some armored cable only "floats" electrically), then you may be able to use a "remod box" to connect to the BX and claim your ground from the box. If none of those is true, then you really should do ...


1

The problem may possibly lie in the ballast, the tube(s), or the switch. The simplest initial test is to replace the tube(s) with (a) new one(s) and see if the problem goes away. If so, the problem was in the tube(s). Testing the ballast and the switch is a little more complicated, but made simpler by ensuring that the fixture is equipped with (a) ...


1

I've owned a light socket exactly like that one - identical in size to an E27 but totally lacking in internal threads. Mine was simply a manufacturing screwup - the rest of the sockets on the shelf, with the same product number, had the expected internal threads. I got mine all the way home and installed before I noticed the flaw. The store was quite happy ...


1

360W 50 Hz transformer is big and expensive. Conductive losses on 30A will be large at 12V. A reasonable approach is consider 5% losses in distribution max. For this you need the average length of cable carrying 30A from source to load. They should not be daisy chained more than 50W per FPC cable unless otherwise suggested by supplier. Lets assume 10m ...


1

Is this approach correct? Basically, yes. 1mm2 twin and earth cable (I presume that is what you are proposing) could carry up to 16A, depending on where it runs, so 1.5A is well within the headroom (assuming that you aren't talking such long runs that voltage drop becomes an issue). For lighting, however, I tend to use 1.5mm2 in preference to cable ...


1

Well, you guys are absolutely brilliant. The problem is nearly fixed. I had comEd come out do just what you said. It turns out that one of the phases coming into the house is bad! So everyone was spot on...the AC was operating at 120 and feeding the rest of the house when it was "on". Half the panel was out because of the bad phase. The "boys in red" at ...


1

What you've probably done is wire the white and black on either side of the switch, like this: And when you close the switch, you're creating a short. What you need to do is wire both blacks to the switch, using the switch to interrupt power to the lights, and wire nut the whites together, creating an always on return path:


1

If you don't know, get an electrician. Your life and property are at stake. I could make some educated guesses here but if you followed them, had a problem, and I found out about it, I'd feel bad.


1

I am a retired electrician. The green wire is a ground wire. The purpose of it is to cause the breaker to trip or the fuse to blow if a short circuit develops. The majority of the time you can just hook up the white (neutral) and black or blue wires and never have any problem. HOWEVER! If a short circuit does develop you may burn the place down! If you ...


1

Assuming florescent lights, the most likely cause is a failed ballast. Generally a bulb or socket issue will only affect 1 or 2 lights, not all 4. Replacing a ballast is pretty straight forward and just requires re-connecting the necessary wires. Make sure you note the old ballast type, as well as the bulb types and wattages when selecting a replacement. ...


1

I posted a response in JoshDM's thread over on Sustainability.stackexchange.com. Replying here as well in case this might help someone. I'd been looking for a 60W equivalent candelabra base bulb for a while too. For the past few years the highest equivalent available to consumers was 40W. Now it looks like the 60's are finally making their way to market. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible