Hot answers tagged

25

a "60W replacement" LED is usually around 10W actual. 10W * 12bulbs * 24 hours = 2880Watt-hours 2880Watt-hours = 2.88 kilowatt-hours Your electric bill shows the price / kilowatt-hour. For me, with all applicable taxes and stuff, it's about $0.145 / kilowatt hour (I just paid my bill, so I have it right here)... yeah, that's 14.5 CENTS. So every 24 ...


9

You will probably save money, but you have omitted several key pieces of information: What is the actual wattage of the bulbs? It's probably around 8-12 watts per bulb for a newer LED but it is easy to verify. How many hours will you save by using a timer? How many timers would you need to buy / how much do they cost? How much do you pay for electricity? ...


9

If this was a normal switch, I would say, no this is not normal. Since the switch does contain a dimmer, it is perfectly normal. Dimmers are electronic devices that do heat up. In fact, because of the heat they create, dimmers are rated for a maximum wattage. Special high wattage dimmers are available, and they even have integrated heat sinks to help ...


6

It is perfectly normal for it to be warm. If it's HOT, you might be over capacity. If there is more than one dimmer in a single box, you generally need to snap off the fins on the side(s) to get them to fit. With less heat sink surface area, they can't dissipate the heat as well, so the capacity is reduced. This is known as "de-rating." In a nutshell, a ...


5

Usually, with those types of "2D" fluorescent tubes, you grasp the central plastic portion and pull down firmly. There are pins in the underside that are gripped by a receptacle in the fitting. A video Another Here's some randomly selected instructions


4

Modern electronic ballast technology (T8, T5) doesn't use starters. I associate starters with old, inefficient magnetic ballast installations. I haven't had to replace a starter in years because they have not been used in any of the newer buildings I've worked in. My preference would be to convert any T12 installation with magnetic ballast and starter to T8 ...


4

As Wolf says, a combination of SPDT and DPDT switches. One switch on each floor, top and bottom are SPDT, all others are DPDT. The number of switches is one more than the number of lights. Here are a couple of ways to wire it: The left diagram shows the sane way. Blue is the neutral leg. The right diagram shows how to use the Carter three-way pattern to ...


3

There are instance where this is possible and legal, such as bathroom vanity bar type lights with an integral and complete back plate. Other than that a box is absolutely mandatory. Here is a good example. Imagine these fixtures flush against the wall.


3

Based on your description, this would be the wiring setup. The yellow 'smudges' are wire nuts and the black ones are re-identified wires, grounds are not shown. Power coming in with /2, feeding down to the switch box with /3, and then going over to the secondary light with /2. I'm only showing this based on perhaps if you're trying to reuse existing wiring ...


3

Am I allowed to add new sockets onto lighting circuit nowadays? Yes. Do I need to worry about lighting per square foot? Other than for your own personal preference since it's your own home, not really. Overloading the lights - well I only use LED lights, but someone in the future might stick something else in, right? What do I tell the ...


3

I did a google search on circular fluorescent light and came up with this picture. It does not have any leads going to it, it looks like a socket connection. The wires just happen to go behind that area. Remove the retainer and unplug the bulb.


3

I have seen this done. There is no special trim. Steps: Install trim Take a utility knife and scribe around the trim exactly. take out enough drywall layer to set trim - some guys just take off the paper mud and sand where needed after reinstalling flush trim Does it look better? Debatable. Is it worth it? Almost in all cases no. Note: My opinion ...


3

Assume we have 6 switches (S1-S6) and 5 lamps (L1-L5) -- also assume that we don't want any lights in the stairs on when the stairs are not in use by anyone (even if there's someone on top of the tower), and that someone walking up the final flight of stairs doesn't want the light below them on. Finally, we can assume that nobody's flipping light switches ...


2

One thing the trim does typically is hide the edge of the drywall which usually, one would not want to look at because it's rough and ugly. It's hard to imagine trim that doesn't extend (at least the thickness of the metal itself) below the surface of the ceiling. If you want a trimless look, what you will probably need to do is apply drywall compound up ...


2

Replacing that light seems like a solid plan, but I think you still need to repair the sheetrock and put in a standard ceiling electrical box. The hard part of drywall repair is taping the seams and floating, texturing, etc. The good news is that you don't need to do any of that. Do the absolute minimum job of replacing the square of drywall and cut a new ...


2

Something is super fishy here, LED's usually require a bit more than 1V especially the "lighting" ones. There are no "Bulbs" in LED's. LED's have very very long lifespans. I don't know LED's failure mode, but I don't think it's usually "getting dim" I think they usually just "go out". I think the SMPS might actually be bad, which I'm sure is built into the ...


2

Short answer: No There may be a way to redesign the circuitry but you are better off, in almost every case, to find replacement lights equivelant to what you are replacing.


2

Difficulty starting is a symptom of worn-out fluorescent tubes. They have a finite lifetime. Some might die after a couple of years regular use, some from the same batch might last ten or more years. See if the tube is slightly darker near one end. Either Change the starter (only on older fittings), or Change the tube Or Replace the fitting with a LED ...


2

I gather this is an expensive, quality fixture that uses dual T5 bulbs, and it has an electronic rapid start or progammed start ballast (that is to say, there's a small time delay before it comes on). All fluorescents are discharge lights (like neon, mercury vapor, sodium and metal halide). They all work by putting high voltage between the ends of the ...


1

Thanks for the update. First, you have raw smarts but you are scattered, not able to describe what you want succinctly - and you seem to have no knowledge of code electrical, this stuff can kill you and burn your house down (with the lemons). You need to learn its pecularities (there are many) before you attempt to homebrew anything like this. Like I say, ...


1

Four-wire is used for "two-way" circuits, and for cases where two circuits are running to the same place (independent control of a ceiling fan and its lights, for example). In the US color coding conventions, red is the "second hot" needed for these applications.


1

The simple answer is: yes, a box is required. Any electrical splices and connections must be enclosed appropriately and grounded if metal.


1

The issue you see is not the LED component itself that has specs to be a "flickering candidate". It is instead related to how the component is designed into the product. There are three main reasons you will see flickering. Many times if a product has many LEDs the circuitry inside (these days almost always a microcontroller) will reduce the number of ...


1

Is there something hidden in the numbers of watt, lumen, or something which might gives a hint whether an LED flickers or not? No. Flicker of LED based lamps is dependent on technical details of the implementation of the driver electronics. Any flickering LED won't flicker if driven with a continuous stable regulated DC current.


1

While most people can make educated guesses about what the coloring means on electrical wires, I would suggest using a multimeter to actually test the wires and through a process of elimination, determine your live wire, the return, and ground wires. Too many ceiling boxes are wired oddly to have confidence in guesses based on wire color. The live wire ...


1

CList gave the answer you're probably looking for and it was a great answer. (About $13 on your monthly bill to run them full time - so $6 savings per month) I'll just add one thing however. It's NEVER cheaper to leave your lights on. Any amount of time that your lights are on, you're paying for it. What it comes down to, is how long you're willing to wait ...


1

The LED bulb packaging should list the power rating of the bulb like 10W or 5W or something. Once you know how much energy the bulb uses, it's a simple math problem of (X Watts * Y Hours) / 1000 = XY KW Hours. Then, from your electric bill you should be able to find a KW Hour price that you pay (say, 15 cents). Multiply the KW Hours used by the price you ...


1

The power plug at the lower left side of the photo is first unplugged (it should pull apart). Next remove the screw and clip shown in the photo at the center of the fixture. Have a helper hold the bulb as it may become loose. The bulb should now be free of the fixture and tha new bulb is installed in reverse order.


1

Maybe- Look up the model # of the fan if it has an optional light kit get the kit for your light. With the kit designed for your light it would still be a UL listed assembly and totally legal. If you can’t find a kit for your light you are taking a chance.


1

Short answer: Yes, but don't. Longer answer: You probably could lash up a light fixture there (although you would need to add a wire to those already running through the stationary shaft). The problem is that unless you use a kit made by the fan manufacturer, you are going to end up with something that you do not want hanging over the head of anyone you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible