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4

I found the answer! @diceless set me on the right track in looking at where the foot of the bulb is connecting to the fixture. Since it was an older fixture (installed in the 80's, I think), the hot contact (Number 1 in this diagram ) was bent down, and it was connecting with the smaller bulb but not the bigger LED bulb. With the circuit turned off at the ...


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Yes. The more efficient bulb will also produce less heat, so it should be fine. The only concern is that if there is a dimmer you need a dimmable bulb, and if there is a touch switch or other circuit that was powering itself via a trickle current thru the bulb that may not work -- but neither it nor the bulb will be harmed by the experiment, so go for it.


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LEDs are better in almost every way other than price: LED Pros: Lower power consumption Longer bulb life, especially if the light is turned on and off frequently (which is hard on CFLs). Generally better color quality, although this varies from bulb to bulb for both LEDs and CFLs. CFLs usually have a CRI around 70-80, and LEDs are usually 80-90+. (See ...


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It looks like its a B15 bayonet base, try https://www.ecolume.co.uk see if they have one in LED.


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That will work. Code depends on where you live, but I can't see anything wrong with making the junction away from the switch. You might have issues doing all this in the fan box. It might be cleaner to put a small box in the ceiling and do your connections, then have a small run down to the fan. And be smart with placement of recessed lighting above a ...


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Well, if we trust google's reverse image lookup, that's a picture of 3528 led light strips in action. The problem is, those light strips have emitters every 5/8", so it's my opinion that you're looking at a bit of photo trickery or a diffuser that isn't ordinarily a part of those kits.


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A repeatedly tripping breaker means that you have a fault somewhere, and the breaker is protecting your house from potentially burning to the ground by tripping. Stop resetting the breaker and call an electrician. If you think that the lighting breaker is causing the problem, then definitely leave that one off. But if your main breaker trips again, I ...


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The two hot legs are NOT out of phase! They are completely in-phase. No current flows through the neutral when the same load is applied to both legs of the hots because all of the current flows through the hots (only) from one end to the other across the entire length of the (power pole) transformer secondary winding. A difference current flows through the ...


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Be careful when reading residential voltage with a DVM meter. My Fluke will read 121VAC at a single pole switch with the switch On, and 50vac with it off. But the scale changes from V to mv (milivolts). The scale changes dynamically and the v in milivolts on my Fluke is very small. 50-60mv is typical voltage float on ground. I have never measured a true ...


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Typically, LED lights are Diodes which are sensitive to polarity (+ vs -) you can blow them if you connect incorrectly or if you over-power the circuit. Other than that, a LED strip is typically quite robust. My guess is that the power source has blown, (since the leds will require a DC input. You can check this by connecting a 12v battery directly to the ...


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I believe this is what you are requesting: the new light must always be off when the original light is off but can optionally be turned on while the original light is on. To accomplish this you can connect the new light in parallel with the original light, but with a switch on the hot leg, like this: Or use a new light that has a built-in pull-chain, ...


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Make sure concrete is above ground. 3-4" is usually good. This will keep standing water out. Paint metal before putting it in concrete. A metal primer and a sealant coat goes a long way. Slope concrete form away from pole on the top 1-2 inches. If you do this right the concrete at pole will be about a 1/2" taller than concrete at edges. Your pole is ...


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One consideration is current draw. CFLs have a power factor of about 0.5, meaning they draw twice as much current as a similarly sized halogen or incandescent bulb, which have power factor of 1.0. So if your fixture is rated for a 50W halogen bulb, that means: 50 = 120*current*1.0 (Power = voltagecurrentpower factor), so the fixture is rated for 0.42 ...



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