Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

1 - TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, preferably from the breaker, not just the switch. Those two screws you see protruding from the box are there to hold up the light fixture. Extend these screws to their full length so that they are in the electrical box, but are as long as they can get. Remove the glass and possibly the lightbulbs from the fixture. You ...


4

Have you adjusted the low-end trim? There is a PDF which they class as "advanced" instructions that describes the procedure on Page 25. Hold On button for 6 seconds, until LED (on dimmer) starts to flash. Hold Down button until lamp turns off or starts to flash. Tap Up button until lamp is not flashing and is stable (or is as bright as you want the lowest ...


3

These would be the equivalent of an R20 flood lamp: R20 is simply a lamp size and style designation. R for reflector lamp. 20 for 20 eights of an inch, or 20/8", or 2.5" in diameter. Just know, standard "A-lamps" will fit similarly to R20 lamps. It's just R lamps are reflector and will concentrate the light basically in one direction, while A lamps glow ...


3

The metal tab in the base of the outlet has been pushed down too far (usually by overtightenig a bulb), and no longer makes good contact with the bulb. This causes sparking that gets worse as it gradually burns away the solder blob, and increases wear on the bulb. You can tell this is happening be examining the base of the failed bulb; there will be a large ...


3

That wiring is AC cable, modern AC cable. I can clearly see the bonding strip that makes the sheathing a grounding conductor. So since a grounding means exists you must use it. With switches, simply screwing them to a grounded metallic box grounds them, as opposed to a receptacle which would need to be a self-grounding type. So technically, just installing ...


3

I don't think there are any real safety concerns - a lot of fancy light switches work this way, and many have the proper safety approvals, which they presumably wouldn't be able to get if it was dangerous. Mostly it's just an annoyance when you have lights that do light up with the tiny amount of power they allow through. If that bothers you, the only ...


2

"Ultimately, my question is, shouldn't all switches and outlets have a dedicated line back to the breaker box?" By modern wiring code, yes, there should be a neutral in the switch box. In older houses, that was not always the case; sometimes only the hot ran through the switchbox (especially when it was wired as a "switch loop").


2

If the switch has screw terminals as opposed to wire leads you DO have to pig-tail a piece of wire to the splice and then connect that tail to the switch. DO NOT place more than one wire under a binding screw terminal, unless of course it is designed for it. Even in that case it would only be designed for up to two wires. Do you have a model number for this ...


2

You can want whatever you want to want, but that won't make it practical or efficient or cost-efficent (which comes back to practical.) There are at least 2 things that might be called a "solar tube" that come immediately to mind, and they are quite dissimilar. One is an "evacuated tube solar collector" and other other is a tubular skylight. I rather ...


2

If you've modified any wiring recently, you may have accidentally connected two separate circuits. Otherwise, the only thing I can think of that could cause this is a short-circuit. Either case is (very) potentially dangerous. If you don't feel comfortable tracking down electrical issues yourself, I would call a licensed electrician right away.


2

I've seen every type of "home automation light switch" system, but they all require some sort of "hub" by a company. Some communicate wirelessly and others do not. They also have varying levels of security. If you are still against a hub, there is one more option you have: Solid state relays. You can wire them inline before all your lights, then put an ...


2

Sliding contact, bathroom, expect failure. Using a ribbon cable in the manner of a cable carrier (should not actually need a cable carrier, though if you wanted to go there you could get a small one) would be far more reliable. Fixed contacts, cable moves. Seen on many inkejet printer printheads (the "doing it with a ribbon cable method", that is.) The real ...


1

The problem with the light in the new fan/light combo is almost certainly an intermittent connection in the fan unit. Often these units come with two sets of wires (one for light and one for fan) that you join together at the fixture for operation from a single switch. Your first point of investigation will be to lower the fixture and check that the ...


1

This is assumes we're talking a screw in bulb socket like a medium base A26. You can adapt the below for other socket types. The first thing to do is test the socket itself. Best way to do this is to use a multi-meter set to AC and an appropriate voltage setting for your supply voltage. Using the test leads, touch the bottom pin and the metal of the base ...


1

There are LED retrofit tubes that do not require ballast removal. Here is an example: http://www.ledsmagazine.com/articles/iif/2013/12/philips-delivers-led-based-t8-tubes-that-work-with-existing-ballasts.html If you installed an LED tube that requires ballast removal into a fixture with the ballast still wired in you almost certainly did kill the LED tube. ...


1

The packaging of your LED tube should specifically state whether or not it is supposed to use a ballast. If you connected a no-ballast tube to a ballasted socket, yes, it is possible that you fried the circuits. See also the answer to http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/95491/is-it-more-energy-efficient-to-remove-the-ballast-by-using-led-tube


1

These all work a little different but basically you have your outlet with the two mounting screws sticking out, the plate, and the light. The plate needs to be secured by the two mounting screws which seems to be the issue right now. It might slide in from a certain angle or the screws might have a nut (each) that came off on the other side. It looks like ...


1

First, you need to ensure there is a neutral in the switch location (A requirement of NEC 2011 section 404.2 C, assuming that applies to you) -- the easiest way to do this is to run a 14/2 NM cable (standard house wire, aka the brand name "Romex") from your power source to the switch first. Second, run a 14/3 wire from the switch to the fan. This has a ...


1

Because IC housing are designed to be in direct contact with insulation they run hotter because the heat from the bulb cannot dissipate as quickly as a non-IC housing which will dissipate heat into the space above the fixture. Installing are vapor proof trim not approved for an IC housing, in an IC housing normally results in the plastic around the glass ...


1

Most should be labelled on the packaging, or on the light string itself, with how much current can be plugged into the socket at the far end of the string. As long as you don't exceed that, you should be fine. (A sequence of a 2A string plugged into a 5A string plugged into a 4A string draws 11A total, and you can't plug that into another string unless (a) ...


1

If they are set up with a plug at one end and a socket at the other, should be fine - though I'd certainly suggest plugging the 2A string into the 5A string, rather than the other way around.


1

It says 2.1 amps/5 meters for the 30 LED/meter strip, 4.2 amps/5 meters for the 60 LED/meter strip. So, that's either a 5 amp @ 12V supply or a 10 amp @ 12V supply. I would not recommend hooking up the two strips in serial; the LEDs at the end of the second strip will likely be much dimmer than the ones at the beginning. You can get around this by running a ...


1

NEC says that you can replace a switch where no grounding conductor exists, though you'll have to use a nonconducting, noncombustible faceplate. For clarity, I'd leave the grounding conductor from the switch disconnected. That way if anybody comes along in the future, they won't be confused and think the enclosure is grounded. National Electrical Code ...


1

There should be no problems with extending the circuit as you suggest. Install another box where you need it, run the cable between the boxes, and hook everything up. I'd contact the local building department, and ask them if they would consider cable run on top of cabinets to be "subject to physical damage". I wouldn't think so, but not all jurisdictions ...


1

The only reason not to connect the ground wire would be because there is nowhere to connect it. Older houses have 14/2 without a ground, particularly to ceiling boxes. The box itself may not be grounded. In this case, it would be better NOT to connect it to the box, as a signal to the next person working in there, "Warning! This is not grounded!" ...


1

There are LED replacement kits that include a bulb, power supply, and trim ring (if you are not wed to your existing ones). They may be less deep than the bulbs you are finding. The bulb base is separate from the rest of the unit to reduce space and ease installation. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of any product or source. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible