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9

It's probably just a broken switch. My guess would be that the switch contact is worn out to the point that it does not make contact, but jiggling it a bit (by turning off and on again) may solve the problem, at least for a little while. Replacing a light switch is a pretty simple matter for a DIYer. I recommend swapping it out and seeing if that solves ...


5

If that was installed in 1958, the wire may or may not have PVC insulation. If it's the old rubber insulation, it's going to be brittle. Bending the wires could crack and compromise the insulation. Also, it's virtually guaranteed that there is no ground wire in that fixture. You should check local electrical code to make sure that replacing the fixture ...


4

Sounds like you have one black hot wire coming into the box (probably that bottom one), which passed through a hot over to your bedroom switch. So my guess would be that you should have two of the blacks wirenutted together -- that would be the hot wire coming in to the box, and the passthrough to the bedroom light. Also in that bundle should be two ...


4

I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


3

Not sure if it's the "approved" method, but I've seen it quite a few times (mostly for fixtures on the front of a garage). The fixture wires are fed through the hole into the box inside, where the electrical connections are made by approved means. Then the fixture is simply mounted directly to the wall, typically with a gasket between the fixture base and ...


3

A pretty common approach is to build a small platform for the lamp to sit on, something like this This has the advantage of giving you more depth to mount a receptacle box. You can use 3/4 inch material (nominally 1x ) or larger, such as 5/4 stock. You can then cut a hole, using a hole saw through the new block and the siding underneath giving you enough ...


3

What is the wattage rating of the switch? Many dimmers are 300 watts (or less if they are trimmed to fit in crowded boxes). You are burning 390 watts. You may be overloading the switch. Your instincts about LEDs is correct, assuming the switch is LED compatible. You also need to be sure to select dimmable LED bulbs.


2

Extension cords are not supposed to be used for permanent fixtures. These fixtures are supposed to be hard wired or directly plugged into a permanent outlet. A common approach to solve this problem would be to install a switched outlet on the ceiling near the fluorescent lights. In many jurisdictions, you could use non-metallic cable to run the outlet and ...


2

If you are wanting to install a wall sconce, you need to install one that is rated for outdoor use. Note: The shape box you need to use will be dependent on what fixtures you would like to install. Some fixtures need round boxes while others require a rectangular box. My examples show round boxes, but this is not the only choice. Aside from being ...


2

That maybe your only way, so you may have to use a stubby screwdriver. Who is the manufacture and what is model number of your fan. If you can, upload a picture.


2

The decision as to whether you have to remove and replace the existing light box rests on a number of factors. The electrical wire hookup to the existing light box appears that it may be under the access lid toward the rear part of the box in your picture. There will be a question as to whether the existing wiring will be long enough to make it to the ...


2

It sounds like two of your red wires form a switch loop to one of your switches. The remaining red wire is the hot (I believe called active in Australia?) coming into your ceiling. By connecting them all together, you have wired your light (and switch) directly to your unswitched power, which is why it stays on. You'll need a multimeter, voltage tester, or ...


2

I would opt to use a 1/2 pancake box 4" in diameter. The NEC code does not permit the canopy or empty space of a fixture to substitute for cubic wire space for wires larger than #16 gauge. And a 4" pancake boxes cubic space legally can only hold one 14/2. Since you already have the wire conduit on the inside of the house I would also consider using ...


1

As long as the water is clean it will work. The main risk is that some amount of water will remain. One solution is to fill a bucket with alcohol then dunk it in the bucket. The evaporation of the alcohol will take all the water with it and make it nice and dry. You can also sit it in the bright sun for a few days.


1

I guess that some clips or other parts that make this 'click' work are not catching firmly and/or are bending as because of temperature. I would try to adjust them if possible (if these are like metal parts) to grip more firmly. If that doesn't work You can either remove these light covers and make a complain in a shop You ordered them (as it shouldn't be a ...


1

Air Tight recessed lights might prevent air seepage from a conditioned area to a non-conditioned area, but they can't do much about thermal transfer. Proper insulation is the only way to fix large amount of thermal leakage. However, your predicament is going to be that your fixtures are not insulation-contact (IC) rated. With non-IC fixtures, you'll not ...


1

An intermittent problem like that is almost always a broken switch or a loose connection. Often, you can "feel" when a switch is broken, so if it feels normal to you, then a loose connection might be the issue. Either way, you need to pull the switch out and check it out. If you are lucky and it is a loose wire, you'll just need to tighten the screw holding ...


1

14in light is a useless figure. What you're looking for is lumens. ("Replaces a X watt incandescent" is also useful, though affected by marketing a bit.) Get a target lumen value, then get a lighting setup that meets this value. LEDs vs fluorescents doesn't matter for getting enough light, just for power-saving purposes. Before you replaced the lights, was ...


1

Dimming LEDs For a typical ceiling fan, the light fixture is exactly that-- a light fixture. It is nothing more than wires, a chain switch, and bulb socket(s). Dimming LED bulbs in a typical ceiling fan fixture will be completely dependent on ensuring a few things: The LED bulbs are dimmable The dimmer switch is rated for use with dimmable LED bulbs The ...



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