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10

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


5

A Non Contact Voltage Detector doesn't replace the need for a Voltmeter but it is an item I keep in my pocket as a quick verification of AC Power. If I cut the power, I'll do a quick test before I go into a wall box to make sure it is cut. If it indicates power when I don't expect it, I will use the volt meter at time to see what it is. I do get a ...


4

Yes, you're looking for lights with a high lumen output. Since LED/CFL bulbs don't convert heat to light, the wattage isn't directly proportional to the light output. As an extreme example, consider that a 2 watt laser is powerful enough to burn some materials, or blind you! What you'll likely find is that more expensive LED bulbs from lighting specialty ...


3

Yes. Outlets are rated for current draw (wattage) not brightness. If you have a more efficient bulb, the outlet doesn't know or care.


3

I'm going to leave minimal for someone else and answer smart.... Put the lights on their own 15A breaker. Put receptacles on a couple of 20 amp breakers. If you MUST share (or think you must) put half the lights and some receptacles on one circuit (probably 15 amp unless you really want to run 12 gauge to lights) and half the lights and some other ...


3

They should use the fluorescent and leave it on if they both are going to use the bathroom within a few minutes of each other. the energy cost of turning it off and on is saved within a few seconds. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/when-turn-your-lights


3

Unless the sensor/light is connected directly to power, the switch will always have to be in the ON position for the light to come on. The switch is installed to interrupt the ungrounded (hot) conductor, so that when it's in the OFF position no power goes to the light. If you want power to the light, you'll have to leave the switch on. In other news, ...


2

Yes replace the ballast. You might as well buy some new tubes while you are there too. And a few grey wire nuts. Find the price for a completely new fixture, before you start looking at the ballasts. The results might surprise you. Read the ballast, it will tell you what it was designed to do. Something like 4 wire, 2 tube, 32 to 40 watt, double pins. ...


2

It matters which one you replace, because that will determine which type of timer you need. One of those switches is going to be the "middle" switch, between the other two circuit-wise. That middle switch is a four-way switch, the two outside switches are three-way switches. You can determine which is which visually is you don't know the circuit layout - the ...


2

This is a classical symptom of cross-circuit false-tripping due to the ballast causing EMI with breaker electronics. I'd try replacing the breaker and ballast first; if that doesn't cure the problem, then there's likely a subtly faulty connection somewhere that's causing RF-rectification EMI.


2

Open one leg of a paper clip and insert it into the little notch next to the wire. The wire should pop right out.


2

The only product that I know of that will do what you want is the Lutron Maestro Light/Fan control. This product consists of a switch and canopy module. The switch will digitally talk to the canopy module over the single ungrounded wire and control lights/fan separately. The kits are one switch and one module but the switch can talk to 4 modules at once.


2

Does the light this switch controls have a second switch? Meaning, is it a three way switch? If so, you should have one white, one black, and one red (this one may be white if it was done by someone who did not use appropriate wiring). This would mean that you will have to find some means of making a plan of what wires run where, and then make the necessary ...


1

The light is designed to dissipate heat through the top of the housing. If you have the ability check to make sure the top of the housing is able to get airflow. CFL and LED lights will help your situation as they do not produce as much heat.


1

Instead of trying to make one large panel to charge multiple lights, just hook up one panel to one light. Sure, that will require more wire but then you don't have to worry about messing with the charging systems. A better idea might be to just forget about solar lighting and get a mains-powered garden lighting kit. These kits include a transformer and low ...


1

The easiest-to-install solution to your issues is a length of 14/3 run in surface raceway and used as a switch loop. You'll want a circular raceway box at the light fixture, and a single gang raceway box at the switch, by the way. (Also note that the non-metallic raceway recommended by dfife's answer won't work here -- Legrand, for some reason, doesn't ...


1

Skylights are pleasing because they fill the room with light which is reflected and diffused off all the surfaces in the room, whereas a typical ceiling lamp is somewhat unidirectional and lights the ceiling almost as much (or possibly more) than the room itself. Uplighting from multiple sources is definitely a good solution for recreating the skylight ...


1

If you are installing a new socket (what I assume you mean by a "light kit" would include one, and I assume that the pictured one is the old one), just cut it off (and strip a little more insulation from it) if you can't get Speedy Petey's trick to work. Don't forget to look inside the socket as another place release holes could be (but probably aren't) ...


1

This is a single pole switch, so you should follow the single pole instructions in the installation guide. Notes: While you could remove the red twist-on wire connector, and use it to connect the black wire from the switch to the other wires. There's no reason to disturb the wires if you don't have to (and you don't have to). Just use the twist-on wire ...


1

This will work, or at least you can connect it. Right now we will trust that it is the right dimmer for the lamps. You have all you need, and if you have made it this far, you will be fine. Adding to the confusion in this project is that the dimmer can be used for either a single pole switch, or a 3 way switch. (Kinda clever for sales, but frustrating ...


1

I determined that my power source was no good. I don't know exactly what is going on, but it seems to be coming from a switched outlet system in another part of the house. Easiest solution, tie up the old power source and find a different one that is cleaner. I found another circuit nearby that was barely used and is actually more spatially related to ...



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