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4

Just looking the fixture itself, and giving the probability of other points of failure... I would guess maybe the ballast on the lamp has given out (probably the silver box in the image). A ballast steps up the voltage so the lamp operate correctly, and they fail on occasion. Finding the replacement ballast might be the hard part and sometimes expensive. ...


3

This symptom is impossible without silicon electronics being involved in the delivery of power. Passive wires and windings are not capable of causing this. Common problems are common, and my first take is usually correct - a series connected old-style smart device. But Carl Witthoft has an interesting theory: these are probably low voltage bulbs. We know ...


3

Some LED's just won't dim, or dim well. If it didn't say dimmable on the package, it probably isn't. G9's are typically 120v, so they shouldn't need a driver unless you bought something that is low voltage (12 or 24v). You may need a better or worse dimmer. First check with the lamp manufacturer. If they are reputable they will have a list of commonly ...


3

You have a 2-way switch. One of the black wires is probably the line and the other carries power to some other device on the circuit; they are connected together by one using the backstab connector and the other the screw. The red wire is probably the load (it's also possible the red is the line and you have two loads controlled by the switch).


3

You need a "switch dummy". Also commonly called a "switch blank", "blank insert" and "blank filler". The big box stores may not carry this item, if not, electrical supply house should have available.


3

I don't know if it's really useful to compare a 120V LED bulb to the stuff you can cobble together from radio shack. First of all the commercial bulbs include a significant amount of circuitry to adjust the voltage, compensate for dimmers, etc. Most bulbs actually accept a wide range of input voltages. And of course with an AC circuit there is no such thing ...


3

Yes, there are. Some speak the X10 carrier-current signalling protocol, some use more modern communications. Obviously you would need to buy compatible components. A good home-automation catalog or a website on that topic could give you product suggestions; we don't generally do that here.


2

A three-way, or single pole double throw (SPDT), switch should be able to do what you want. Connect the ungrounded (hot) line feeding the switch, to the common terminal on the three-way switch. Connect the ungrounded (hot) line feeding the main light, to one of the switched terminals on the three-way switch. Connect the ungrounded (hot) line feeding the ...


2

Three way switches (dimming or not) have a common terminal and two traveler terminals. The common terminal of one switch in the pair is connected to the hot source and on the other switch, the common is connected to the fixture. On your dimmer switch, the common is the reddish colored screw on the bottom of the first picture. It has a loop because it is the ...


1

You have two questions. To the first question of how to get the wire out of the existing box, you would mount a surface-mount box on top of the existing box and put a blank face place on it. Then the plastic wire mold could come out of the raised, blank box and run to the new raised box. The wire must always travel inside an approved box or conduit. You ...


1

When wiring with cable, and the feed is coming to the light, the standard is to feed a single pole with the white wire (the code requires this) and return with the black wire. If you connect the white wire to the other white wires at the light fixture you create a dead short when the switch is closed this would trip the GFCI if you are downstream from it. ...


1

Open up the switch box, and have a look how it's wired. Without more information (photos, diagrams, etc.), the following information is an educated guess. One of the colored lines (red, black) is likely always hot, while the other is controlled by the switch. The white is most probably neutral, and the bare/green is almost certainly ground. If this is the ...


1

I would sell this kit and go with another one that is compatible with LED lighting and your wiring scheme. This one is not. If you're not into that ... Looking at the manual for this 45607 dimming 3-way... each smart device needs always-hot (which I show as black here), neutral and ground, which is fairly typical of smart devices. They need power ...


1

It sounds like you do not have a neutral at either of the current 3-way switches. This was common in the past, although new wiring now requires a neutral at every switch. The white wire in old 3-way setups is usually the common wire, either carrying line hot to the switch or carrying hot to the fixture after the second switch. If so, the white wire was ...


1

My questions are... Is it normal to have one transformer per bulb? Yes, though not always. Track fittings in particular use many bulbs (usually 12V MR16) off a single transformer/driver. My assumption is that the LED bulbs flash because the transformer is not the right one, is this correct and which one should I get? I also assume the other ...


1

wrap the bulb in saran wrap or equivalent. It will provide a great grip and reduce risk of flying fragments should the bulb break. Wear a protective glove and glasses too.


1

Updating this for posterity and to share our solution. Background -- 4 pin cfls with Sylvania Quicktronics residential series ballast, QTR 1x26T4 (120v). 6 can lights on the same switch. Same bad behavior as the OP -- some lights came on; others didn't in a totally random fashion. On the possibility that there were simply too many lights on that circuit, ...


1

Some are. You can also get transformers designed to mount into a 1/2” knockout in a junction box. The transformer proper sits outside the box. You can also find transformers which sit on the outside of a metal box cover. These are very common in 24VAC. These are typically true transformers. You may be using the word "transformer" loosely to mean ...


1

I use separate detectors from lamps, and here's how I wire them. First, I use the type of sensor which has its own neutral (rather than the type which has no neutral and sits in a "switch loop".) This is very important. The sensor needs to be able to power itself independently (via hot and neutral) and not care what if anything is on the output. I run ...


1

I think ThreePhaseEel and A.I. Berveleri have figured this out. That circuit was originally wired for a light only, with a 12/2 cable going up there - hot (black), neutral (white) and ground. Somebody added the fan later on, and they cheated. They used ground for neutral. They used black for the fan and white for the light. First, mark your wires. ...


1

According to any number of help pages, e.g. this one, MR16 sockets and bulbs are designed for 5 to 24 V operation. It's highly likely that's what you've got here. So the question becomes: what is your current operating voltage, and what is the voltage requirement for the LED bulbs you bought? If there's a mismatch, that's why things don't work.



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