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4

Probably the glass bulb has separated from the base. Wear eye protection and heavy gloves. Turn off power to the socket. Pull the glass portion of the bulb out forcibly, breaking it if necessary. By spinning it around several times, you might be able to keep the glass intact and simply break the wires to the base. Unscrew the base from the socket by ...


4

I'm assuming this is a 100 watt equivalent bulb, that is actually only running 18-20 watts. Using a 100 watt equivalent will be safe as they run much cooler than even an incandescent.


3

The power consumption permitted by the fixture is 9 watts; the bulb that you've selected is 11 watts. You've exceeded the permitted wattage, even if it is by a very small margin. Is it safe? Most of the max wattage specifications by manufacturers are conservative, so you would probably be fine. But why exceed a stated limit? I would suggest considering a ...


3

Since you say 150-180V is low, I assume you live in a country where the standard voltage is 230V? The first thing I would do is contact the electric company to see what they can do. It's possible there is a defect in the connection to your house from the main utility lines that's causing the abnormally-low voltage. There are probably all sorts of things ...


3

18g stranded wire is quite common on arms 14g stranded is often used to join the 18g arm strands, and to tie into the ceiling. This applies to North America and normal chandeliers with relatively low (<50 each) wattage bulbs.


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


2

First of all, when you read about a "50W LED", it is certainly saying that it outputs the equivalent light of a 50W incandescent light (although that is often a exaggeration). That "50W" LED actually draws less than 10 watts. This means that it draws much less current and emits much less heat, both of which are the factors that typically limit the allowable ...


2

There are fluorescent ballasts that accept a wide voltage input range (just as the LED ballasts that other answers are suggesting.) Since you appear to want fluorescent lights, those would be what to seek out. 100-277VAC is a typical input range, as is 120-277VAC (277 is common in 3-phase systems where a lot of commercial lighting is installed.) If you ...


2

Since you didn't specify your country, I'm assuming that you have a normal mains voltage of 230 or 240 volts. Yes, low voltage will cause your incandescent lights to dim. On the good side, they will last a lot longer than normal. If you want to try staying with incandescent lights, you can try higher wattages. For example, replace a 60W light with a 100W. ...


2

As put in the comments, you should never put a switch in the neutral of a light. Further, I am going to assume you are in a place where they use the wire colours as follows, because that seems the case in your drawing (I don't know all the world-wide colour schemes, but the most famous one that fits you image is this one I think): Brown = Phase ( = hot ) ...


2

It looks a bit of an unusual setup, but I'll hazard a guess that there is either a further light on the circuit either fed from one of the switches or the power from the circuit is fed in at a switch and feeds on from here to another light (or lights). (Obviously, you need to verify this, as we can't tell how it's wired from just one photograph). From left ...


2

All lamps have a size designation which is stated in eights of an inch (1/8"). That particular lamp will most likely not fit in your fixture if it is designed to take a standard A-lamp. That is an R30 size lamp which is 3-3/4" wide. An R20 style lamp (2-1/2" wide) would be more in line size wise with an A-lamp, which is actually an A-19.


1

While this does not directly answer your question, perhaps it is worth your while to persuade the electric utility to adjust their equipment to get your service up to snuff. Distribution transformers have various closely spaced taps on them just for fine tuning delivery voltage. Utilities tend to be motivated to deliver full voltage because low voltage ...


1

there are so many brands and types of LED lamps. Some get hot some do not. All lamps give off heat though...compared to a 60W or more traditional light bulb...there's most likely less heat in an LED. But to answer your question....sure you can use an LED flood there. there are many options. I like 1000bulbs.com for buying stuff for the house. pretty ...


1

Any thoughts? Plainly something is messed up. I have many times taken apart a switch and discovered that the previous homeowner was creative in their choices. A recent one: white was hot and black was neutral, ground was open, the switch was wired to interrupt the neutral, the white wire from the lamp was connected to the black wire from the wall, and ...


1

Read the rating carefully. If it says Max 40 w Incandescent, (CFL 9 W) then you are ok with the 11 watt bulb. This issue comes up from time to time, and it's due to a misguided belief that a 9W CFL is in all ways equivalent to a 40 incandescent. This is not true. Very simply, A 40 W element will consume and output 40 W of energy. Incandescents are ...


1

If you're in the US, NEC likely applies. Article 402 covers fixture wires, and explains what types and sizes are allowed. Type Table 402.3 lists the types of wires allowed to be used as fixture wires. If you're going to rewire the fixture, you'll have to use a type of wire listed in this table. FFH-2 HF, HFF KF-1, KF-2, KFF-1, KFF-2 PAF, PAFF PF, PFF ...


1

Ceiling fans are often wired for two power sources, one to the light and one to the fan. There may or may not be a wall switch for either. One standard way to wire this is to use four-conductor cable, with the additional "hot" power coming on the fourth wire. If you had noted how the fan was hooked up before you dismounted it, that would have helped. But, ...


1

Should be doable with relay logic. Switch one powers the center top light and the coils of two relays that do the top left and right corners. Switch 2 powers the left-center 2 lights and the coils of two DIFFERENT relays that power the top and bottom left corners. Switch 3 (once you correct your diagram per comments) powers the bottom center light and the ...


1

Every switch sits in-between two hot wires. One is always hot, from the mains, and one is hot when the switch is active, and that one goes to the controlled device(s). It sounds like you have connected the hot wire (black) from the mains directly to the hot going to the fixtures. The always hot switch should be connected to one black wire on the dimmer and ...


1

Yes wiring into your lighting is absolutely fine and would be a more complete solution as opposed to plugging the transformer into your wall socket. One thing with these 30A 12V transformers is that they are usually open terminal so I would advise you to get an enclosure if you do not already have one.


1

PAR stands for Parabolic Aluminized Reflector, by the way. The numeric part of the number is the diameter in eighths of an inch. A PAR38 will be 4-3/4" in diameter and an R20 or PAR R20 should be 2-1/2" in diameter.



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