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4

Yes, using non-dimmable lamps on a dimmer will eventually damage one or the other. Usually the lamps will suffer, specifically the driver in the LED. Using the dimmer on full high should be OK, but you have to be careful to keep it that way.


4

You are right to be concerned about safety. Attempting to use the sockets as they are is a hazard, the exposed conductors are an electrical and safety concern. What you have is a replacement part for repairing a damaged fixture.


4

That component is called the starter. its a really inexpensive component that regulary fails on florescent lights. to remove you turn 1/4 rotations left and pull out. to check that its in turn right until it stops whilst pressing. Any good lighting store will have replacement starters for your light. Otherwise the things to check would be. check ...


3

There's no problem doing what you want. Just make sure the junction is in a box, and the box is proper size and accessible.


3

It's impossible to say for sure without inspecting the lamp, but it sounds like a bad CFL. Have you already checked to be sure that the bulb is screwed in securely? You could use a multimeter to check for continuity through all of the wires to the socket (which can be difficult when trying to find an intermittent connection since digital multimeters ...


3

Put the sensor in the space you are trying to light, and suddenly this "common need" becomes "not a need at all" which is why you can't find them, since that's how it's done, when done conventionally. Either move the switch into the room or get a remote sensor switch and put the sensor in the room.


2

Yes, dimmers reduce energy consumption of dimmable LEDs. Unlike incandescent bulbs, the electricity used is fairly linear with the light output; at 50% brightness it should use roughly 50% of the power. Generally speaking, dimming will allow the bulbs to run cooler and extend their life spans. There may be some exceptions for some particular bulbs with ...


2

Where can the problem be? The problem might be that you didn't take into account that neutral is usually tied to ground/earth. In the US this typically occurs at the point the supply enters the building.


2

As @mikes said, this is a replacement part - NOT a complete fixture. Rather than cobbling up some mess of electrical tape, just buy a plain porcelain (or plastic, though oddly the porcelain are often cheaper, and I assume the reason you are contemplating this at all is to keep costs down) lampholder that is designed for the job, and don't create an ...


1

Add hickeys until you can hang a box like this from it. Grind off the tabs if you don't like them, paint it to match the ceiling. You will probably need a bushing to make the connection from the last hickey to the new box. Having pulled the wires through the hickeys, install the relay. Add a cross bar to hang more hickeys, from which you hang the light. ...


1

As stated, this is not really possible with normal relay switches. you CAN however add a toggle relay board which will toggle each time it sensors state changes from the PIR or motion sensor. LINK HERE These boards can be found/built at any electronics store. You could probably find a commercial kit online somewhere (besides the provided link) In this ...


1

A switch like this either does not exist, or is not commercially available. It sounds like you need to teach the folks you live with (and maybe yourself), how to turn off lights when they (you) leave a room. Occupancy sensors; like the one you have, turn on when they detect motion, and have a delayed off when no more motion is detected. In some cases ...


1

The white wire (neutral) coming in should be directly connected to the white wire on the lamp. The black wire coming in is the hot line. The toggle switch is used to either break or connect the hot line. The black wire coming in to the lamp should be connected to one of the black wires of the switch. The other black wire from the switch should be connected ...


1

Presumably the black and red wires are the hot and switched, corresponding to your current switch. If the box is gounded, that one's good. The issue (depending how the box is wired) may be that the timer needs a neutral connection, and if the box only has "switch loops" run to it it may not currently HAVE a neutral wire - in which case you need to get one ...


1

As noted, this is not an entry level project. (And drywall is the enemy, but fear not.) Safety notes: turn off circuits that you're messing with. Have a tester that tells you if a wire is hot. Don't assume that wire colors mean anything. If you think there's a chance that you'll hit plumbing/ gas/ other wires/ etc when drilling, then open up the drywall and ...


1

You can always use the concept of a sun tube, a mirrored tube that runs from the roof to a room. If the walls of the alcove that houses the skylight are not already white, paint them white. It will reflect more light than a darker color. If you really want as much light from the skylight as possible, mount mirrors on the walls of the skylight.



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