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13

Put simply; the smart switch contains electronics that needs power to operate, while a regular switch just mechanically cuts the load. Regular switch: Smart switch: Source: http://www.vesternet.com/blog/2014/09/why-smart-switches-cant-be-used-without-neutral/


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with 1 3-way switches you can do this so you have a on/off (SW2) switch and a selector (SW1) switch.


2

Do you have a picture of the cover? It seems very likely that all your problem simply relate to an overheating. Is there a chance for a better air flow (thermal ventilation)?


2

Either 3 timers, one on each circuit, or one timer, controlling 3 relays, one relay on each circuit. The timer and relay control can be on a 4th circuit, or on one of the three circuits if there is capacity available. Whatever device does the switching needs to be adequate to handle switching the load - that is, the relay contacts must be rated to carry as ...


2

In order so that the switch can be 'on' to receive the RF signals, it needs a return path for itself so the 'load' isn't on all the time. Having the neutral wire present at the switch allows this to happen, and then when you command the load to turn on, it can pass through all the electricity to the load and thence back via that neutral wire to your load ...


2

I'm not sure "hollowing out" makes any sense. Start by just not completely screwing in the bulbs you don't want lit (or leaving them out entirely). As bulbs burn out, you can switch to using the dead bulbs as your placeholders.


2

Personally, I say it's personal preference. We found we like daylight 5000K better so as bulbs burn out I get new LEDs (previously CFLs) that are daylight. Eventually they'll all be changed but for now they are mixed and we don't mind. What's your preference? That's what I'd go with.


2

Try adding a single halogen along with a few LED's, and see if that fixes things. If it does you probably do actually have a dimmer, you just don't know it. Or the power supply doesn't understand the load and keeps switching itself on and off. And note this: CAUTION: Recommended for use with 50-60Hz AC magnetic transformers or regulated DC power ...


2

The filament is there to add strength to the cord. Everything else stretches more than the poly-fiber so when you pull on it(the cord) it strains against the fiber instead of the delicate electrical connections. As far as splicing it goes...you could tie a knot in it if there's enough slack or just ignore it and be careful with that spot in the future. And ...


1

There are LED replacement kits that include a bulb, power supply, and trim ring (if you are not wed to your existing ones). They may be less deep than the bulbs you are finding. The bulb base is separate from the rest of the unit to reduce space and ease installation. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of any product or source. ...


1

You can't. You don't have enough conductors between the switches. It takes 2 "hot" traveler wires plus a neutral and a ground to do a single 3-way "traveler" circuit; that's 4 wires total. The neutral and ground can be shared between multiple devices, so to do what you want you need 2 more traveler wires for the other device (fan).


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The tone of your post scares me a little. Meaning if you are working in this box and cannot even identify the neutral, and are asking if one of the blacks is it, you should really get some experience or read up on basic home wiring before you start pulling things apart. Bottom line is, the bundle of spliced whites in the bak of the box is your neutral.


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Unplug the fixture or turn off the circuit, unscrew the screw that is visible and its related screw(s), read the information on the ballast (which should be inside the area the screw gives access to.)


1

it's usually pretty easy to change the fittings: make sure electricity is off (turn off the breaker that powers the light) double check the electricity is off loosen the screws that hold it up on the ceiling and keep the wires attached. Remember which wire is connected to the ground (bare/green or yellow green striped wire), live (red, orange or blue ...



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