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In this particular case, the black wire WAS NOT getting triggered by the switch. For the fixtures in question, the red wire needed to connect to the Black fixture wire, while the black wires were the "extra hot leg" that needed to be capped off separately.


4

Yes, you wired it wrong. :) The red wire is another hot leg. This is a common installation when the electrician is providing wires for a ceiling fan with lights (to be independently switched). The red wire shares a common neutral with the black wire, hence the three white wires. You should keep the white wires connected. Disconnect the red wire and cap ...


2

Looks like it might be an EJ500 Astro In-Wall Timer, or similar device. Here's a link to the Installation Instructions (PDF). According to the instructions, the switch at the top of the device is an "air gap" switch. Which is "designed to turn power off for routine maintenance". You remove the battery holder "by prying left and right of the holder ...


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Do you know what the part pointed to by the red arrow is for? I am not familiar with this unit but the indicated item seems like it could be a catch to allow the control panel unit to be removed from the wall mount. It is also possible that this could be a manual override switch although this seems more unlikely from looking at the pictures.


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I ended up just cutting the cage off using an ordinary pair of scissors. Haven't had any problems since.


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A compact florescent (CFL) definitely heats up and needs to have room to dissipate that heat. It is not nearly as hot (25–33%) as an equivalently bright incandescent, but the radiation pattern is different too. An incandescent has most of its heat coming out the bulb with only a small proportion from near the narrow base. A CFL has electronics in ...


1

Since there's no grounding conductor in the box (i.e. the box is not grounded), touching a meter lead to metal is basically useless.Your COM probe should go to the grounded (neutral) (white wire in your case), then you can use the other probe to test for voltage. It sounds to me like there might be a problem with the wiring inside the fixture, since you ...


2

There is a junction box somewhere at the end of the cable, best to find it and start your wiring from there. You can cut the cable, and use the wires, but it is difficult without the right tool, and then you have to hope you have enough length and use the proper fittings to mount it to the new ceiling box.


2

Sounds like you have your switch leg ( switch loop ) mixed up. You need to isolate it. It is the wire going to the switch. A simple continuity test will determine which wire is the switch leg. You need a continuity tester and most voltage testers check continuity. As for the ground, there is none available unless you provide a new circuit to the panel ...


1

Three way switches offer a convenience that is sometimes not appreciated until you eliminate them and then are living without them. One thing to consider if you are trying to split these four light fixtures into two in order to have times when your whole kitchen is not blaring in full light is to consider a different approach. You could replace these two ...


4

Have a go at one of those three finger lookin' things holding the glass. Unscrew the little bolt holding it it. Or, more likely, one of them might be spring loaded. Take care not to drop the glass.


1

If I understand this situation correctly, both red cables are Positive and carry the current from switches. You may want to check both red cables if they really correspond to these 2 switches. If so, I guess You need to choose which circuit (1st red + N + E or 2nd red + N + E) You want to use, cuz I guess You will be using just 1 switch/dimmer (as Your 'new' ...


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You probably have 4 rails there, just two happen to be in-line, on either side of the power input (gray block in center.) Your problem is likely at the right side (in the picture) corner connector. Given that the power supply appears to be shared, the power supply would seem to be fine given the working lights - but the conductors are not conducting around ...


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Specifically that is a 78mm T3 halogen lamp. I have one in my bathroom as well and love it because: The bulbs are pretty cheap. Usually a couple dollars. I bought 10 on ebay for $20. They are BRIGHT. Much brighter than LED bulbs, and some fixtures can take 200 or 250W bulbs. For a light over a mirror thats only on a few minutes a day, I dont care ...


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As to "why" - Halogens were trendy for a while. They are somewhat more efficient (energy in to light out) than traditional incandescent bulbs, and offered a whiter light- long before serious LED lighting was developed. Longer bulb life is another factor (again, .vs. traditional incandescents) - work has one of those miserable fixtures that the Powers That ...


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That's a type of halogen lamp.


2

Strictly speaking, that round metal mounting bracket on the back of the fixture is supposed to be secured to an electrical box. It can be a shallow box, but it's supposed to be a box. You must protect the wires. You want that new garage to still be there 10 years from now. I can't really tell from the photo, but the right shallow metal box should fit ...



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