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It might be possible that more than once the electrical work has been carried out after the house has been constructed. These multiple wires has to be checked whether which one is the live wire, neutral and the earth wire. You must check the voltages with a multimeter to verify the existing voltages.


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A pretty common approach is to build a small platform for the lamp to sit on, something like this This has the advantage of giving you more depth to mount a receptacle box. You can use 3/4 inch material (nominally 1x ) or larger, such as 5/4 stock. You can then cut a hole, using a hole saw through the new block and the siding underneath giving you enough ...


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I would opt to use a 1/2 pancake box 4" in diameter. The NEC code does not permit the canopy or empty space of a fixture to substitute for cubic wire space for wires larger than #16 gauge. And a 4" pancake boxes cubic space legally can only hold one 14/2. Since you already have the wire conduit on the inside of the house I would also consider using ...


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Not sure if it's the "approved" method, but I've seen it quite a few times (mostly for fixtures on the front of a garage). The fixture wires are fed through the hole into the box inside, where the electrical connections are made by approved means. Then the fixture is simply mounted directly to the wall, typically with a gasket between the fixture base and ...


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It's not the wiring. It's the LEDs themselves. LEDs have a characteristic delay when turning them on which may be more than you're used to from a lifetime of incandescent bulbs. Swap the LEDs from one position to another, and the problem should move with the bulb. Replace the LED with the equivalent incandescent (temporarily) and it should go away ...


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Drywall anchors are used in vertical walls and the rating is based on a combination of shear load (downward on the screw and anchor) and some tension load outward (based on an assumption of a load close to the wall). Ceiling mounts are pure tension loads downward and the weak spot is the drywall, not the anchor. A thin diameter of crumbly plaster around the ...


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Most drywall anchors are meant to be used vertically not horizontally. Walls yes ceilings NO. If you bought the anchors look at the box it should tell you. As for me I use toggle bolts and washers. Find the weight of the fixture and get the toggle bolt and washer to match.


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Always turn off the power. What it looks like you have is Bendable/Flexible track lighting. If you look at the junction box that the light came with and remove the canopy it may have the manufacturer name on a sticker on the inside. Now finding exact match parts may not be available, but if you have the voltage that track/lamp is, you may be able to find a ...


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You are correct the Black or Color wire should be the hot/power and the white is the neutral, but as long as the wire is marked with black tape is was okay. Now you stated that you turned off the switch and you still had power at the fixture, that is because whom every wired this fixture may have switched the neutral and not the hot/power, which is no longer ...


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So, the box in the ceiling has two pair coming into it. Two black white pair. One comes from the power source. Think of that one as Line and Neutral. The other one runs to the light switch wherever that is. ( If you open the switch, you should find a black and white on the two screws. ) Therefore, the two black wires are connected and beep your ...


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Doesn't seem that strange at all. I'm not there, and can't probe the wiring to confirm, but this is a common wiring method when power comes to the fixture outlet first. Power comes to the fixture outlet on one of the black wires, then goes to the switch on the other. Power comes back from the switch on a white wire, and goes back to the breaker on the ...


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It could be a defective light bulb. It is very odd.


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Generally speaking, you must connect ceiling live cable (CL) to fixture live (FL) and ceiling neutral (CN) to fixture neutral (FN). As comments state, your fixture may not have a ground cable (strictly speaking), but some kind of screw, most probably with proper designation indented on it or with a proper sticker. If that's so, your ground cable from ceiling ...



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