New answers tagged

1

If that's really how the wiring is running through the building, you need a "switch loop" configuration. Hot (black) to light box to switch; switch output (white relabelled black or red) to lamp hot (black); lamp neutral (white) to neutral running back to the breaker box (white). The bare copper wire from the lamp is a safety ground, and should be attached ...


0

The easy answer is "Hook it up just like the previous light was hooked up", but I'm assuming that you didn't keep track of the original configuration. To make it work again, connect both of the lamp white wires to the white wire coming from the circuit breaker panel. Then connect the black wire from the panel to the black wire leading to the switch. Then ...


0

I think the black from the breaker should go to the black from the switch. Then the two whites should hook into the light. The white from the switch will now become the hot/positive wire. (Or the exact opposite is true... I'm not sure if it matters.) At any rate... the circuit need to flow to the switch. without seeing the fixture, I'm guessing it ...


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Remote control. A two device unit, one part plugs into the wall outlet and the lamp plugs into it, and the other is a remote control. The remote can be mounted on the wall or Mobil. there are many versions of this option. I am waiting for the price to drop on the Philips Hue system, smart phone controlled and geo tag-able. do a youtube search for "Philips ...


1

There are lots of plug-in receivers, or controllable outlets, for the various home automation systems. Then all you need is a compatible transmitting switch, possibly battery operated. Example: I currently have an X10 setup (cheapest home-automation product in all senses of the word cheap; adequate for playing with for now) in my living room where a remote ...


0

Is the fixture made of metal? If it does not have external metal components (such as a case or cage) then it would have no use for a safety ground. The safety ground is connected to conductive surfaces that shouldn't normally carry power, but if you don't have conductive surfaces then it is not applicable. However, if the fixture does have external metal ...


-1

It looks like the metal screw socket would be touchable without the plastic ring in place. When the bulb is lit, I believe that would be hot (energized). Since they may use the same base for different size screw fittings, the ring is possibly designed to protect from shock hazard but being a separate component allows the base to accommodate various sized ...


0

I found that when I replaced the four incandescent 40 watt lamps in my ceiling fan light fixture with LED 60 watt rated (about 6 watts) they wouldn't work unless I reinstall one incandescent. I think it's because the dimmer needs at least 40 watts to work. I guess I'd better replace the dimmer with one rated for LED, but so far they will dim or work bright. ...


0

Three way light switches can be wired several ways, and yes, there is often red wires involved in the traveler or perhaps a 14/3 split power feed going to another circuit. So my advise, without back tracing and figuring out exactly where each wire goes and is used for, is to use the exact same two red wires. If possible, use a voltage meter or proximity ...


1

Old 3-way switches should have 3 wires running between them - two messengers and the return. While this isn't always possible depending on where power was fed to the circuit, my preferred way is to re-task them to be always-hot, switched-hot, and neutral. I put "smart switches" at each location, which provide the auto-off feature you require. There are a ...


0

You want a time delay switch or time lag switch Random example: Timing range 2 minutes - 2 hours Feather light touch activation 16A maximum for incandescent, fluorescent and resistive loads Retrofit into 25mm standard back box Re-trigger and cancellation function Concealed fixing screws, screwless finish Blue neon indicator ring Last minute indicator ...


6

How about a light switch with a motion sensor? They make ones that are occupancy detectors (detecting motion and then turning on), and vacancy sensors (detecting absence of motion and then turning off). They'll also have a button which can manually toggle the light on or off, and you can set the sensitivity and how long an absence is required before the ...


1

Modern retrofits do not use a ballast at all like this. Most have universal drivers, they can run on 100-277 VAC 50Hz or 60Hz. Here is another example. Things to think about, the color of light 5000K will be a very white closer to sunlight, 3000K is more yellow orange. With the same lumens I think the 5000K and higher wavelength lights look brighter with the ...


0

The existing fixtures are fluorescent, right? If so, then the ballast is typically in the fixture. Remove everything. You didn't say whether you're planning to set up a LED power source and distribute that. That might be a lot of work. If you are just using LED bulbs with standard threaded base (same base as incandescent bulbs), then just install whatever ...


1

A 42W bulb is only going to produce 42 Watts of heat (well, a little less since some of the energy escapes as light (roughly 3 - 5% for a halogen)). So as long as the fixture is rated for at least 42 watts, that bulb will be fine. The max wattage limit should be noted on the fixture somewhere, either on a sticker, or embossed in the metal. I think your ...


3

Assuming only one fixture controlled by that switch, you seem to have a typical switch loop here. Connect per this diagram:


0

It's almost guaranteed that you need to keep turning that finial (perhaps pull down on it while you are turning it, in case its threads are stripped). Keep turning and turning. Eventually this will allow the glassed enclosure to drop down off the aligning screws that can be seen in one of your photos. That should completely expose the bulbs, making them ...


1

There's two "proper" solutions. First, you could install a box rated for the location (dry, damp, wet). Terminate the wires in the box, and install an appropriate blank cover. The other option is to find where the wires originate, and disconnect them. Then you can either tuck the wires back into the hole in the wall, or if possible remove the wires ...


0

A15 refers to the size of the glass part. The small base size is known as an E12 Candelabra base. Anything with that size, screw-in base should fit in the socket, but it has to be A15 to fit within the shade. Also, watch out for the rating or brightness of the bulb. The Harbor Breeze model ceiling fans usually say MAX 60W. So that's around 14W for CFL ...



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