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Never gonna work. Take the dimmer back and get the right thing. It won't be the first one the shop has taken back for that reason. But, know this -- a dimmer switch that works with an old-style 3-way** is a hard problem. The device that can solve it is sophisticated. Basically it has to be able to power itself off either of the two travelers, supply ...


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I'd try to correct this with cinematic gels - sheets of tinted plastic used to correct cinematic lighting. You don't need to buy a variety - you can stack up multiple layers. It may just be too darn bright. After 40 years of seeing tiny red LED indicators, one thinks LEDs struggle to make a paltry amount of light. Not at all. They can be extremely ...


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By "meter test", I assume you mean a voltage reading from side to base contacts. By "rewired" I assume replaced? Heat will expand the socket base. Pull the base tabs down to create a tighter contact. Using sandpaper, scuff the bulb ends that meet the contact. Bad connections create higher amperage draw, which yields more heat, thus burn-out. Again, I'm ...


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From the looks of your updated photo, your house was wired with a 50s/60s type of NM that carried an undersized (16AWG) "ground"-but-not-really-a-ground with it. The common practice with these wires was to fold them back into or screw them to the cableclamps instead of bringing them into the box and pigtailing them to a ground screw on the box. In this ...


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The cans themselves are not wet rated. You should install a fixture that is. Such as a strip light that is sealed and gasketed. Something rated for outdoors. Good luck!


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You appear to have older 14-2 without ground coming in from 4 directions, and each of those (or at least three of them) has a separate uninsulated ground alongside. If you combine them and pigtail to the box and your fixture, in theory everything will be protected.


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Agree with Kris in the earlier post. Look at one of the main wires coming through the conduit in the upper left. It looks like there's a very clearly-cut ground wire that was cut close to the entrance into the box.


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Here's my best guess at the wiring based on the photo. Looks like you've got one hot/neutral coming into the box from the panel (or another switch/outlet), and you've got 2 hot/neutrals going out of the box to other switches/outlets. Since these are all joined together, it doesn't really matter which one is coming in and which two are going out. Then it ...


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Always attach a ground to a light fixture regardless if someone can touch it. what happens if the fixture has a short in it but it doesn't blow fuse becaus there's no ground, it'll catch on fire and continue to burn, please consult a licensed electrician. As an electricia n I wouldn't even install a light fixture on a knob and tube box nor would I replace a ...


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Some condos are multi-use, i.e., both residential/commercial mix, so maybe it's possible the yellow is a high leg, 277V for the common area lighting that is just there for "future development". Ask the building superintendents. They are usually filled with many great stories of advice.


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It sounds like power is fed through the ceiling... here's a look at the wiring that you should have: If you hooked it up correctly, then either the lamp, fuse, or switch is faulty.


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From the looks of your fixture, I am almost 100% certain the ballasts are electronic. These newer types of ballasts can detect bad fluorescent bulbs, and will automatically stop trying to ignite the bulb, thus, not wasting energy. Older ballasts would continue to try to ignite the bulb. There is no harm in leaving the bad bulbs in place.


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One possible idea for this connection is to look for an octagon electrical box cover that looks like this: Then acquire a box to box electrical connector that looks like this: This can then be joined to a back hole in an appropriate electrical box that gets surface mounted to the face of the wall. This box would then accommodate the needed outlet and ...


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It sure looks like you could use a common porcelain A19 keyless replacement socket with bracket, like this: You may find this at a good local hardware store or lighting shop, or order it on the web. You will need to bypass the ballast as mentioned by @Mazura. Alterations of manufactured fixtures void the safety ratings and such (I personally would not be ...


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Those have ballasts in them, so it's not a simple re-wire, per se. Nor do I think any adapter would be available, because of that. You'd have to swap the guts out (the inner can) with one from a new can, and hopefully it will fit (they're not fun to get back into the can they came out of in the first place, so expect some difficulty). I don't think you can ...



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