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1

You need to acquire a light fixture mounting bracket. The type that you need would look like the bracket as shown in the picture below: Install it through the longer slotted holes into the existing electrical box holes. You can use the screws from the old light fixture. Due to the deep recess of the electrical box the bracket arm with the long slotted ...


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So long as you will not overload the circuit (figure out what all is on the circuit), you should be fine.


2

The noise is coming from the ballast (the part which converts 120 or 240 (or whatever the local standard is) VAC to the voltage and current required for the fluorescent bulb. Given that the fixture no longer works with a new bulb, that has failed, but some portion of it is still trying to work and the high-speed electrical switching common in newer-style ...


1

The simplest solution would be to disconnect the electrical connection within in the light fitting. If the fitting in question is not the last fitting in the "chain", you might need to keep the incoming and outgoing switched connections joined to pass the power on to the next fitting. Usual disclaimer - only do this if you know what you're doing and switch ...


1

These all work a little different but basically you have your outlet with the two mounting screws sticking out, the plate, and the light. The plate needs to be secured by the two mounting screws which seems to be the issue right now. It might slide in from a certain angle or the screws might have a nut (each) that came off on the other side. It looks like ...


9

1 - TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, preferably from the breaker, not just the switch. Those two screws you see protruding from the box are there to hold up the light fixture. Extend these screws to their full length so that they are in the electrical box, but are as long as they can get. Remove the glass and possibly the lightbulbs from the fixture. You ...


0

Sounds like you have a short (hot to switched) that is providing power directly to the light, bypassing the switches. Start with checking any junction boxes or splices, and any exposed wiring that might have been gnawed on by animals. Or if you have had carpenters/construction (amateur or professional) when the problem started, suspect a nail through a ...


0

You have a pilot light switch. Some are on when the circuit is on, others are on when the circuit is off and some can be set either way. It sounds like what you want is an illuminated switch, one that guides you to the switch in the dark so you can turn it on. While some pilot light switches can do that (and yours might), the simple illuminated switches ...


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You have it right. Remember that capacitors can store power for some time, so be careful when handling. I would recommend removing the ignitor, capacitor, and ballast to ensure some future user does not attempt to incorrectly re-wire the fixture. Remember, safety first: turn off and secure the power supply prior to servicing.



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