New answers tagged

1

There is always some fine print. I don't know if this is the light that you purchased, but it has the exact wording, so I'll show it as the example. The line in question means that they are surface mountable up to that level of light output (since they produce more heat.)


1

High output fluorescent lights do generate a fair amount of heat. If directly attached to a solid surface the ballast will over heat and may turn off to cool down. The life of the light will be reduced due to the high heat. I always use 12 gauge single jack chain for mounting the 6 tube enclosed fixtures. I do have 5 or 6, 4 tube open fixtures that are ...


1

Typically there are two hot wires coming into a fan box that has separate switches for the fan and light kit. Typically the black is used for the fan, and the red is for the light kit. That said, other color combinations are possible. Typically, the blue wire from your fan/light combo supplies the light kit. Whichever of the two hot wires was connected to ...


-1

I have been told by an engineer who designs these, that an inductive inrush current on the line conductor can and will trip the receptacle, it just depends upon the magnitude and time duration of the event. The newer production units are much faster than the older ones and monitor all 3 wired connections. This does apply to a transformer or in your case a ...


3

Am I allowed to add new sockets onto lighting circuit nowadays? Yes. Do I need to worry about lighting per square foot? Other than for your own personal preference since it's your own home, not really. Overloading the lights - well I only use LED lights, but someone in the future might stick something else in, right? What do I tell the ...


0

Yes and no, some testing is possible but it won't reveal all possible faults. What you can do with a multimeter You can measure the resistance of insulation but the test voltage will be low so certain types of fault will be missed. You can measure the resistance of conductive pathways (both those intended to carry current and those intended to be ...


9

You don't need a bulb at all to test the fixture. There should be one main "neutral", and one main "hot" wire coming out of the fixture. If there's more than one of each, you can tie each set all together, or test each one individually. The following procedure assumes a single "hot", and single "neutral". First, set the multimeter to test continuity , or ...


2

If it is for incandescent lamps there is little that can go wrong with it but if you screw a good lamp into each socket and use your multimeter in continuity or ohms you should be able to test each socket individually. The resistance of a 40 watt 120 volt lamp is about 360 ohms. Without any lamps screwed in you should get ~infinite resistance or no ...


1

Multimeter probably isn't going to tell you much For a light fixture that takes incandescent bulbs, about the only thing that you can do is put known-good bulbs in the fixture and measure the resistance between the two wires. If there is infinite resistance, the wiring connections are bad somewhere, and if the resistance is lower than the resistance of a ...


3

I think I understand all the requirements: The natural action when leaving the bathroom is to turn one of the doorknobs and open the door. For safety reasons this action, without any other required motions, must allow egress from the room under any and all conditions. (Thanks Wolf Harper) Also, to solve the specified problem, opening the door this way, ...


0

I have a ceiling fan with four sockets. One socket would not work at all, and one caused a CFL light to flicker and hum when in use, and burn out in about a month. I disassembled the fan to check the wiring. Redoing the lamp wiring (5 white wires into a twist-on wire connector, and 5 black wires into another twist-on connector) was enough to get the ...


2

Are they on a dimmer? I run an electrical wholesale company and this comes up all the time. It's not the wiring it's the dimmer switch. Find out the brand led bulb (or led trim) and see witch dimmer is compatible with that brand. Then buy that dimmer and install it. All done!! :) Ps it's probably a lutron AY-153P-wh


2

I'll assume it's the normal use-case of basically honest people trying to avoid "whoops, sorry, didn't know you were in there". Locks must always allow exit, so deadbolts are out. I'd look for alternate solutions: Electric strikes (retractable door-jambs), which secure with the bathroom light on. Now leave the privacy locks on both doors locked all the ...


0

EDITED: Now that you've posted a picture... ;-) Still test to confirm this, but it looks to me as if: The 2 blacks and 1 white that are connected, are feeding power through the light box to downstream outlets and also sending power to the switch (on the white wire). Wrap the end of this white wire with black tape or mark it with a black permanent marker. ...


1

While most people can make educated guesses about what the coloring means on electrical wires, I would suggest using a multimeter to actually test the wires and through a process of elimination, determine your live wire, the return, and ground wires. Too many ceiling boxes are wired oddly to have confidence in guesses based on wire color. The live wire ...


3

DO NOT BUILD THIS PROJECT. It is not safe. I am leaving the description here for now to retain the comments. For a safe version of the Jack&Jill bathroom project see my other answer, that begins with "I think I understand all the requirements:" Shop for "Electric Bolt Locks (Fail Safe)". These sell for about $40 to $500 but you certainly don't need the ...


0

If you want to be a "Maker", you could use low-voltge LED strips which have rows of LEDs on a flexible strip about 3/8” wide and backed with sticky-tape. They only emit about 140-180 degrees, but you could stick them to both sides of a strip of aluminum or fiberboard shoved up inside a transparent or translucent (fogged) pipe. That would give near 360 degree ...


1

That type of bulb just snaps in and out with a little pressure. It probably broke because the UV light had weakened the plastic, or because it force was applied in a sideways direction. To remove it, turn off the light via the switch or circuit breaker. Grab the remaining plastic with a needle-nose plier and pull it straight outward. Do not twist or tilt ...


1

Maybe- Look up the model # of the fan if it has an optional light kit get the kit for your light. With the kit designed for your light it would still be a UL listed assembly and totally legal. If you can’t find a kit for your light you are taking a chance.


1

Short answer: Yes, but don't. Longer answer: You probably could lash up a light fixture there (although you would need to add a wire to those already running through the stationary shaft). The problem is that unless you use a kit made by the fan manufacturer, you are going to end up with something that you do not want hanging over the head of anyone you ...


4

Modern electronic ballast technology (T8, T5) doesn't use starters. I associate starters with old, inefficient magnetic ballast installations. I haven't had to replace a starter in years because they have not been used in any of the newer buildings I've worked in. My preference would be to convert any T12 installation with magnetic ballast and starter to T8 ...


1

I believe it's the same concept, that it'll go unnoticed. Not everyone notices every instance that happens in their own home, sadly. Whether or not people do what's said to be safe, it's at least worth knowing of.


-1

Can someone explain what each of these wires do? I see a single green wire, This is a grounding pigtail that was supposed to ground the junction box itself. It should be joined to the other greens most likely. a single blue hot leg of a 120/208 system? 4 green wires twisted together almost certainly earth ground 4 white wires twisted ...



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