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2

First of all, when you read about a "50W LED", it is certainly saying that it outputs the equivalent light of a 50W incandescent light (although that is often a exaggeration). That "50W" LED actually draws less than 10 watts. This means that it draws much less current and emits much less heat, both of which are the factors that typically limit the allowable ...


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If this is a modern home, then there is no issue. If you have turn of the century wiring, then that is another story.


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You can put some tape over the opening and a warning label stating that they are still connected. If you want to expend the effort you can remove the sockets and put a cover where the wires came out (again with labels stating the hotness of the wires).


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In most cases, this would pose no problem. Lighting circuits in most homes are 15 amp lines. That means the line can theoretically handle about 1800 watts at one time without tripping the circuit breaker or posing a hazard. That equals 18 100 watt lights at the same time. Or one 1200 watt vacuum cleaner and 6 100 watt bulbs. At the same time. Wattage ...


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Yes it could matter your best course of action would be to determine all loads connected to that circuit and potential loads to see if the circuit will be likely to handle the additional load. Connected loads will most likely be other lights. You can either identify them and add the wattage or better turn them all on and check the amperage that breaker with ...


7

Depends on what you mean by "safe". I wouldn't entirely trust it with a kid in the house, but it's probably fine for adults. On the other hand, you can make it a bit safer by screwing in a dead bulb (which, like everyone, you'll acquire over time), or one of the edison-base-to-outlet adapters available at hardware stores. I'd consider either of those ...


1

There are a few reasons you might not want to use an LED bulb in a fixture: If the fixture is dimmable and the LED bulb is not, the bulb may flicker or not come on. If the fixture is enclosed, an LED bulb may overheat. (LED bulbs generate much less heat than incandescents, but they do generate some... and they're a lot more sensitive to overheating). Some ...


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If the LED bulb is dimable it might work. Typically when you see incandescent only it is modifying the AC wave form. Incandescent bulbs don't care and can work over a pretty broad range. Where bulbs that have a solid state controller or transformer in it are pretty limited to a standard AC wave form. And if that LED/CF bulb can be dimmed, they they can ...


6

For a multi-bulb fixture the LED units do not want to be in the area where high heat is generated as would be the case with incandescent or especially with halogen bulbs. CFLs have their own special considerations if they are used in situations with special types of lamp dimmers. Such special dimmers may not be compatible with LED lighting modules. ...


1

If you live in the USA, that's a perfectly fine ballast for your purposes, Lori. Some manufacturers bring the yellow wires out the same end, some bring them out the opposite end. That ballast is rated to handle two 40W T12 tubes. If you live in a country with 240V municipal power, though, that ballast won't work for you; it's built to be connected only to ...


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Leave it long. You'll appreciate that later, if you ever need to change anything there and are forced to shorten it. As long as you can still stuff all the wires into the enclosure, longer is better.


2

If the black and white wires are properly terminated then there is no problem with having a bare grounding wire in the electrical box. Common house wiring uses Romex type cabling that has insulated black and white wires and a bare grounding wire.


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The nut in the center should be all that is holding the glass. I think you need to look closely at the edge of the glass where it contacts the fixture for traces of an adhesive someone may have used and maybe pry gently with a plastic tool keeping the nut and washer on the threads like in the picture. Other than that I'm not sure without damaging the ...


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The light fixture should have come loose after loosening that nut. Try the following: Get a step ladder or ladder and place it directly bellow the light. Get on the ladder :) Determine if the fixture is 2 separate pieces or 1 whole piece (glass + gold decorative ring) Carefully grab the light fixture with both hands and firmly turn the light fixture a ...



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