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21

I'm not sure how much room you have to work in, but an option would be to rent a 16 foot step ladder at your local tool rental center. If the bulbs are pointed down, maybe some type of bulb grabber on an extension pole. Got a pic of the fixture?


14

If you are uncomfortable with working at heights you can hire someone to change the lights (and clean the fan). Think about installing LED light bulbs. You may never need to change them again.


14

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


12

Pick up a small bucket of an all purpose patch likeDap Flexall All Purpose Filler. The all purpose stuff is a little thicker than typical joint compound, so it makes filling a bit easier. Remove the switch cover. Using a taping knife, fill in the holes by pushing the compound into the hole and drawing the knife away from the hole. Like so... Repeat ...


12

The power (from the breaker) is likely at the light fixture. When you hook black to black and white to white, the light is powered directly from the breaker. In this configuration, when you flip the switch on you create a short through the switch. What you need to do is hook it up like this. Notice the white wire that runs between the switch and the ...


12

It looks like you've ruined it. The stranded wires (such as the black one visible in the picture) are usually permanently attached to the lamp (Inside those cloth tubes). The solid wires are your household wiring. Normally you'd attach the stranded black to the solid black with a wire nut, and the same with the whites. Then attach the bare copper ground ...


12

I had a very similar light, and the key was this: Any upward pressure exerted from grabbing the glass created friction that made it not turn. You want to touch as lightly as you can, near the edges, and try to apply rotational energy only, with no pushing up. Unfortunately, that is roughly impossible to do if you're reaching so high that you need to ...


10

A small scaffolding tower might be your best option. This will give you the height and safety you need. Something like this one. While it might be a bit expensive for just changing light bulbs you'll need it when you come to paint the ceiling in this room.


10

Specifically that is a 78mm T3 halogen lamp. I have one in my bathroom as well and love it because: The bulbs are pretty cheap. Usually a couple dollars. I bought 10 on ebay for $20. They are BRIGHT. Much brighter than LED bulbs, and some fixtures can take 200 or 250W bulbs. For a light over a mirror thats only on a few minutes a day, I dont care ...


9

Does your ceiling fan wobble? Shaking a light bulb can break the filament. See How do I balance a ceiling fan? Is your line voltage reliable? An electrician told me once that he swears by 130V-rated bulbs. If voltage surges a little, the 130V bulb will tolerate it better than lower-rated bulbs. The rating is printed on the top of the bulb. However, if this ...


9

Use a NCVT (non-contact voltage tester) and see which of the two wires alarms when the switch is on. That will be your black/hot wire. If both of them alarm, stop, do not pass go, something else is wrong. For the ground, you don't have one. The safest thing to do is run a whole new wire back to the panel. Anything else is "less than safest".


9

One reason bulbs can burn out quickly is if the voltage applied to them is higher than the expected voltage (120V in The USA). Wiring problems and bad transformers can cause the voltage to be out of spec. Another reason is if there is a loose connection somewhere, and the light flickers (causing unnecessary heating/cooling cycles). A third reason is if the ...


9

1 - TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, preferably from the breaker, not just the switch. Those two screws you see protruding from the box are there to hold up the light fixture. Extend these screws to their full length so that they are in the electrical box, but are as long as they can get. Remove the glass and possibly the lightbulbs from the fixture. You ...


9

Contact your local building department, and ask them if this would require a permit, and if you can do the work yourself. That's the only way to know for sure, as different areas have different rules. You'll likely have to pay a small fee for the permit, and have the work inspected at different stages of the job (or maybe only once it's done). Most areas ...


8

I would not recommend gluing it. If it comes off (wind, animal), it is going to likely pull the stucco off with it in which case you have a big problem and possibly costly repair. I would just use the screws since it is easier to fill two small holes then fix a large patch of stucco. Make sure to use screws long enough to penetrate the solid material ...


8

First, make sure the fixture is switched off. Using a small piece of cloth, to protect your fingers in case the bulb breaks, grab the bulb firmly near the base, and rock it slightly back and forth (left to right), so that you are alternately pulling on one pin, then the other. Once the pins start to move you will probably be able to pull it straight out. ...


8

Reduced Weight As you've noticed, electronic ballasts are lighter. Reduced Lamp Flicker Because the electronic ballast operates at a higher cycle rate, flicker is less noticeable. Quieter Operation Again, because of the high cycle rate, hum is reduced. More Efficient Magnetic ballasts can have losses between 5-25%, while electronic ballasts have ...


8

After an hour of searching google Home Depot Looks like your light Taking the description from the Home Depot page, I found this PDF for installation instructions PDF Looking at the PDF and the photos, it looks like there is a white trim ring around the glass. Instead of prying from the trim that touches the ceiling, see if theres another lip closer ...


8

It is generally not acceptable to have wire junctions be inaccessible. The rule of thumb is: All junctions must be in a box, but that box must be accessible - you cannot legally close a box up behind drywall. There are some limited exceptions, as noted here. You should run a new line if you don't have the slack.


8

First measure this distance on the light base: Then check this distance on the existing bracket. (These should be the threaded holes in the bracket). If those two dimensions match then use the screws B to mount the base to the existing bracket into the threaded holes. You should be able to start the screws into the bracket and then slide the light base ...


8

Depends on what you mean by "safe". I wouldn't entirely trust it with a kid in the house, but it's probably fine for adults. On the other hand, you can make it a bit safer by screwing in a dead bulb (which, like everyone, you'll acquire over time), or one of the edison-base-to-outlet adapters available at hardware stores. I'd consider either of those ...


7

You can use something like this Wall Repair Patch to give some support to the new plaster. Cut out a square in the patch to match the size of the junction box and then put the patch in place (with the face plate off). Then apply joint compound to those gaps; the patch will give the joint compound some support. Finally when everything is dry then put the ...


7

The first thing you need to understand about "allowances" on any building job is that those are usually way too low to equip the real wants of the buyer. When talking lighting, most lighting supply houses have a "spec" line of fixtures that contractors use to figure the allowance. They are typically the least expensive fixture for the application. When you ...


7

The instructions for the fixture are only correct for a metal box. If a metal box was used, the box itself would (should) be grounded. The bracket that holds the light would then be connected to the box, which would make the bracket grounded. Finally the ground wire from the fixture would attach to the bracket, grounding the fixture. In the case of a ...


7

Start by determining which holes on the bracket, line up with the holes on the fixture... Next install screws B into those holes on the bracket, with the head of the screw facing down. Do not tighten the screws down, you want them just started in the holes. Fit the fixture over the screws, so that the screws come through the mounting holes on the ...


7

You have to be careful here, because it's possible that those holes are there for ventilation, as John said. So instead of trying to seal them completely, the absolute most you should do is cover them with some kind of mesh which will have holes small enough to keep out the flies but large enough to allow air flow. A metal screen mesh - the kind used in ...


6

I have included two images. The first identifies the wires in your current switch and the second image identifies where to put said wires. In case your wondering the "S" terminals are for slave units


6

Most likely the second white and second black wires are the connection to the switch itself. If so, then what you've got is power line from circuit box to light, switch line from light to switch. (The alternate method is power line from circuit box to switch, switch line from switch to light - which would have been less confusing for you but he probably ...


6

A standing floor lamp that emits light up will reflect light off the ceiling and create ambient illumination. However, it won't be connected to a wall light switch (unless you have or wire a switched outlet). I actually prefer standing lamps to overhead lights, since overhead lights can create harsh shadows (especially if there's just one bright one in the ...


6

Sometimes when ceiling boxes are roughed in, they use x/3 with ground cable so that they can supply 1 switched hot, 1 neural, 1 hot/switched hot, and 1 ground to the ceiling box. This allows a ceiling fan to be installed in such a way that the fan can be controlled either by a separate switch, or using only the attached pull chain. In this situation the ...



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