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3

I don't know if it's really useful to compare a 120V LED bulb to the stuff you can cobble together from radio shack. First of all the commercial bulbs include a significant amount of circuitry to adjust the voltage, compensate for dimmers, etc. Most bulbs actually accept a wide range of input voltages. And of course with an AC circuit there is no such thing ...


2

Three way switches (dimming or not) have a common terminal and two traveler terminals. The common terminal of one switch in the pair is connected to the hot source and on the other switch, the common is connected to the fixture. On your dimmer switch, the common is the reddish colored screw on the bottom of the first picture. It has a loop because it is the ...


0

The color of wires isn't important, and the reason the black wire loops through the one screw is because it's a home run (supply) that also feeds other parts of the circuit. Maintain the positions of the wires based on screw color and orientation (odd-colored screw and the one on the same side vs. the opposite side) and you should be fine.


3

Some LED's just won't dim, or dim well. If it didn't say dimmable on the package, it probably isn't. G9's are typically 120v, so they shouldn't need a driver unless you bought something that is low voltage (12 or 24v). You may need a better or worse dimmer. First check with the lamp manufacturer. If they are reputable they will have a list of commonly ...


1

Some are. You can also get transformers designed to mount into a 1/2” knockout in a junction box. The transformer proper sits outside the box. You can also find transformers which sit on the outside of a metal box cover. These are very common in 24VAC. These are typically true transformers. You may be using the word "transformer" loosely to mean ...


1

Looks like maybe this older bulb design was defective. Cree replaced them for free with the new models and none of them have the same flickering problem in this fixture as the old ones did, and none have burned out.


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According to any number of help pages, e.g. this one, MR16 sockets and bulbs are designed for 5 to 24 V operation. It's highly likely that's what you've got here. So the question becomes: what is your current operating voltage, and what is the voltage requirement for the LED bulbs you bought? If there's a mismatch, that's why things don't work.


3

This symptom is impossible without silicon electronics being involved in the delivery of power. Passive wires and windings are not capable of causing this. Common problems are common, and my first take is usually correct - a series connected old-style smart device. But Carl Witthoft has an interesting theory: these are probably low voltage bulbs. We know ...



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