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1

You will need a ohmmeter. Disconnect the IR Controller (the white box with white wires). If you check the the voltage drop (in the connector of the white wire) between the Positive (+) and the different wires. If you find that they all respond to commands from the remote... except for the port for the blue wire (which controls the blue light), then the ...


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I found that when I replaced the four incandescent 40 watt lamps in my ceiling fan light fixture with LED 60 watt rated (about 6 watts) they wouldn't work unless I reinstall one incandescent. I think it's because the dimmer needs at least 40 watts to work. I guess I'd better replace the dimmer with one rated for LED, but so far they will dim or work bright. ...


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My suggestion would be to use a garden-variety incandescent dimmer, connect the sconce light to it directly, then connect a Lutron GRX-TVI to it and use it to provide 0-10V to the LED driver.


2

Is this normal? No, but it is not especially unusual. Do I have a problem with my wiring setup? Insufficient information to tell. Do LEDs behave this way? It is a common problem with some types of LED "bulb" in certain situations. LED replacements for incandescent lights are relatively new so a lot of house wiring and accessories that people ...


1

Typically the reason for the low wattage rating is because of small gauge wire used in the fixture that would not be rated for much higher wattage/current draw required by 40 or 60 watt incandescent bulbs. Incandescent or halogen bulbs burn much hotter and in an enclosed space can fail prematurely. As far as using LED bulbs, they should work fine. The draw ...


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The answer depends more on the (triac) dimmer. LEDs have a sweet spot for voltage and will operate for a long time in the sweet spot. LED/triac dimmers actually just turn on and off rapidly. LEDs can handle the on/off better than other kinds of light, but the "flickering" would be the factor in break-down. At 0V obviously the LED would last for a very long ...


3

Here's what doesn't apply to you, but does apply to most consumer LEDs (sold as primary lighting devices, i.e. screw in bulbs, fluorescent replacements etc): They are significantly overdriven from spec, for instance an LED will be sold as a 10 watt emitter, however the datasheet will spec it for baseline performance at 1050ma at around 3.3 volts - now hold ...


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I'm guessing your switch does not have a dedicated neutral connection. The switch needs power in order for the touch sensor to operate. Without a dedicated neutral, it acts as a high-resistance device and leaks power back over the other hot connector. With incandescent bulbs, there is not enough power to light them up and you don't notice this, but with ...


4

It doesn't matter. As AC current alternates, the only difference between the two input cables is which is connected to ground (in your switchboard and/or at the supply transformer). The only case where they need to be differentiated is when switching - you should not switch neutral, except in very few cases where you also switch phase.



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