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I'd just get a new ceiling fan that accepts standard base bulbs. You can pick one up for like $50 at your local orange or blue home improvement store. Then you can use standard-sized LED bulbs at whatever brightness you like. I did this a few months ago and now have a ceiling fan with three 800 lumen LEDs that's super bright. Heck, given the price of these ...


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I posted a response in JoshDM's thread over on Sustainability.stackexchange.com. Replying here as well in case this might help someone. I'd been looking for a 60W equivalent candelabra base bulb for a while too. For the past few years the highest equivalent available to consumers was 40W. Now it looks like the 60's are finally making their way to market. ...


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Its the transformer for halogens that did the LEDs in. The wiring had nothing to do with the problem you mentioned. Its best to use a driver designed for LEDs to power them. If you can share the specs on the LED lamps and weather there is a circuit in the lamp and how are the LEDs connected (in series back to back or in parallel) I can help you with the ...


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Are all the fixtures connected to one ballast? In any case the the power supply or driver needs to be changed. You will need a driver that is rated in Current and voltage to match the number of lamps you connect to it. If you can share the current and voltage rating of the Led lamps purchased I can help you with that. Noor


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You probably need to replace the power supply with one designed for LEDs. According to various web sites: You aren't putting DC-only LEDs in an AC system, right? Some LEDs have compatibility issues with transformers designed for halogens. In particular, the power supply may have a minimum load and your all-LED setup uses too few watts: "When replacing with ...


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Ok, with the updated question... no, you really shouldn't ever power a permanently mounted light fixture from an extension cord inside a dwelling. It's acceptable in a utility outbuilding or agricultural building, but not inside a dwelling - there's too much inherent risk of an occupant (might not be you) damaging the extension cord and starting a house ...


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Check the wiring carefully to make sure that the neutral is not switched by the dimmer and the hot run continuous to the fixtures. I was just looking at the type of dimmer you have. Very few good reviews on this product.


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I can't find any information about the Superswitch 2701 touch dimmer but from the name alone I'm going to make this guess. It sounds like the dimmer uses some electricity to operate. And in order to do this, is just lets some current pass through the switch for it to work. Normally, an incandescent bulb would just let this low current pass through it ...


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Your dimmer needs to be adjusted. Check the manual that came with it for instructions. This is usually accomplished by turning an adjustment screw somewhere.


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When you turn them OFF (switch physically off) or when you turn the dimmer down to minimum? That's an important distinction. The dimmer may always allow some small current through it. If you're getting some small but distinct glow when the power switch is turned off, though, you're getting some sort of parasitic power or drain from SOMEWHERE. I'd suspect ...



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