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It's either an intentional product feature (i.e. To serve as a night light) or an ...unintentional bug which would require really exceptionally bad design. If this is a quality premium unit, I would expect the former; if it's a bargain priced thing from China perhaps the latter. But it would be really unusual for a product defect to leave a tiny bit of ...


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Buy 12V LED strip lighting. Google: 3528 5050 5630 5730 7020 SMD Strip LED. (Pick one number and google that, not all at once.) eBay is a great place to get it. The bigger the number the brighter the light, but since you probably want an entire strip running the length of the bed you might not want a bright one. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMD_LED_Module ...


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Something is super fishy here, LED's usually require a bit more than 1V especially the "lighting" ones. There are no "Bulbs" in LED's. LED's have very very long lifespans. I don't know LED's failure mode, but I don't think it's usually "getting dim" I think they usually just "go out". I think the SMPS might actually be bad, which I'm sure is built into the ...


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Short answers: Will this even work? Yes, but it'll probably be worse than what you have now in terms of brightness. Will the lights just be dimmer... Yes, they will. ...or would the transformer overwork itself? No, a transformer is internally set at what ratio to step down the main voltage coming into it. It will always produce the same ...


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Short answer: No There may be a way to redesign the circuitry but you are better off, in almost every case, to find replacement lights equivelant to what you are replacing.


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There are multiple ways of looking at this, high quality 12V LEDs are hard to find and can be quite expensive... however some people are very satisfied with the 12V LEDs that are available. Transformers also waste energy but the efficiency can vary greatly. As long as you are on the grid, I would use higher voltage LEDs since they're cheaper and you'll use ...


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You have all the right parts. If you didn't want to dim them, this would be simple - just parallel them all to the power supply. Since you do want to dim them, you need to think about how dimming works. These products are generally PWM dimmers which pulse the LEDs on and off, and the percentage of "on" time decides the brightness. LED amplifiers take ...


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The issue you see is not the LED component itself that has specs to be a "flickering candidate". It is instead related to how the component is designed into the product. There are three main reasons you will see flickering. Many times if a product has many LEDs the circuitry inside (these days almost always a microcontroller) will reduce the number of ...


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Is there something hidden in the numbers of watt, lumen, or something which might gives a hint whether an LED flickers or not? No. Flicker of LED based lamps is dependent on technical details of the implementation of the driver electronics. Any flickering LED won't flicker if driven with a continuous stable regulated DC current.


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Are they on a dimmer? I run an electrical wholesale company and this comes up all the time. It's not the wiring it's the dimmer switch. Find out the brand led bulb (or led trim) and see witch dimmer is compatible with that brand. Then buy that dimmer and install it. All done!! :) Ps it's probably a lutron AY-153P-wh


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"Gx53 LED Light Bulb 110 Volts 5 Watts Warm White with Lamp Base for Ceiling Downlight Under Counter Lighting (5 Watts)" These are available through Amazon and can be hard wired directly into your existing wiring with individual switches if necessary. Voltage transformers are only another unnecessary weak link you can do without.


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These are currently available:- "Gx53 LED Light Bulb 110 Volts 5 Watts Warm White with Lamp Base for Ceiling Downlight Under Counter Lighting (5 Watts)" and will hardwire directly into your existing 120V wiring. It also removes the requirement for AC/DC transformers which are just another link for failure.



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