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1

I'm going to assume when you say "connected to a driver" that it's a DC LED strip. Possible problems: The power supply (what you call the driver) could be broken. If it's a cheap one, that's not uncommon. You could have the wires to the strip backwards; if it's DC, the polarity is important. The wires to the strip could be broken. The LEDs could be burnt ...


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One problem with this approach is that LEDs are not incandescent bulbs. LEDs (stripped of the on-board driver circuit which normally handles that part) are "current mode" devices - that is, an LED driver closely controls the current through the LED, and the voltage may vary. When driving multiple LEDs, they either need to be in series and driven off a ...


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The lamps will draw more than their labeling since there are losses converting AC to DC for the LED's. The previous poster's math is off but he is correct that the lower voltage means more losses over long distances. 200 watts would seem sufficient to run 10 - 14w lamps with added losses for rectification. I suspect the drivers are going bad from heat ...


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You've probably connected one of the 2 power wires to the incorrect traveler terminal on the switch. This switch can be used as both a standard two-way switch as well as a three-way switch. (A three-way switch is used when there are 2 switches controlling the same device.) In standard two-way arrangement, one of the power wires should be attached to the ...


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I've repaired 3 of my LED lights that were blinking by replacing both electrolytic capacitors. Capacitance was OK, but the capacitor resistance (ESR) was too high on both of them


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First I would go with warm white lights not the cool white, I think it makes a softer look to the bedroom. In terms of the switching, yes a push button switch would work fine, you just have to make sure that the switch is within spec for the lights used. I have rather opted for a dimmable solution with my childrens beds. since they like to have some light ...


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To go around the top of the frames on each bunk so they have their own lighting. I'm guessing 5m is about the most you can power from a single 12v adapter in series, but what about in parallel? Limited only by the amperage of the 12V power adapter. Next question... is it possible to use a switch such as this: It is rated for 12V @ 3A. If the LEDs ...


1

There are LED retrofit tubes that do not require ballast removal. Here is an example: http://www.ledsmagazine.com/articles/iif/2013/12/philips-delivers-led-based-t8-tubes-that-work-with-existing-ballasts.html If you installed an LED tube that requires ballast removal into a fixture with the ballast still wired in you almost certainly did kill the LED tube. ...


1

The packaging of your LED tube should specifically state whether or not it is supposed to use a ballast. If you connected a no-ballast tube to a ballasted socket, yes, it is possible that you fried the circuits. See also the answer to http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/95491/is-it-more-energy-efficient-to-remove-the-ballast-by-using-led-tube


3

These would be the equivalent of an R20 flood lamp: R20 is simply a lamp size and style designation. R for reflector lamp. 20 for 20 eights of an inch, or 20/8", or 2.5" in diameter. Just know, standard "A-lamps" will fit similarly to R20 lamps. It's just R lamps are reflector and will concentrate the light basically in one direction, while A lamps glow ...


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If you want a single control to do this, look at multi-position rotary or slide switches. It's fairly common to have a switch that connects a common to two outputs (let's call them A and B) and gives you the choices off, A only, A and B, or B only. Variants which drop one of those options are also readily available. Switches of this sort are often seen in ...


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My wife bought a good quality ceiling light with 12 individual lights. I bought a trailing edge dimmer, but I found that the lights started to flicker after about 20 minutes. I carried out various fault finding with no success. I eventually contacted THORN who made the dimmer switch and they told me that it was probably a design issue and that they would ...


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It says 2.1 amps/5 meters for the 30 LED/meter strip, 4.2 amps/5 meters for the 60 LED/meter strip. So, that's either a 5 amp @ 12V supply or a 10 amp @ 12V supply. I would not recommend hooking up the two strips in serial; the LEDs at the end of the second strip will likely be much dimmer than the ones at the beginning. You can get around this by running a ...


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I have a house that has pretty high (12-13 foot) ceilings with recessed cans. I was using 120 Watt BR40 bulbs (the highest wattage allowed for the cans), and my electric bills were over the top. About 3 years ago, I switched to CFL's, and my bills went down significantly. Unfortunately, my wife did not like the CFL's (light color, long time to turn on, etc, ...


2

new-work Halo cans are adjustable to accommodate different ceiling height. Remove the reflector trim and the lamp. Then remove the three sheet metal screws from near the bottom of the can. Slowly work the can down and out. There is enough slack in the jacketed cable to let the can hang about six inches below the ceiling. Reach through the hole and unclip ...



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