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This usually means that the transformer either is not large enough or not compatible with your LED bulbs. It could also be a problematic bulb or socket, so before replacing the transformer, try the bulbs in different sockets and see if its still always adding the 4th bulb in the same location that causes the issue. If its always the same bulb, regardless ...


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I would love it if PowerOverEthernet would provide the answer and it still may, but after reading examples of the voltage drop and drop in brightness along a series of LED strip lighting, AC sounds better.


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Wow! You can use the screw in type LED bulbs, which contain their own controllers. These are typically dimmable down to about 20% using standard wiring. Here, we have Cree bulbs that look VERY similar to old Edison (tungsten) A19 bulbs, rather than the funny looking futuristic LED's. They're also much cheaper than the older screw-in LED's, about $8 each for ...


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This is a complicated topic because it's very subjective, and also humans' perception of brightness is very inaccurate (non-linear). Among the many difficulties in comparing LED dimming to old-fashioned incandescent dimming: LED bulbs just don't dim as much. Some LED bulbs publish dimming specs (e.g. "dimmable to 10%"), but since humans' eyes are so bad ...


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I'm in same boat. When I redid the house I'm in, I installed as much LED lighting as I could and the rest is halogen. What I've learned is, dimming range is based completely on the driver in the LED bulb. And most LED bulbs will only dim to about 20-30% of there maximum. I'm sure you know how dimmers work, but for those that don't it is basically a ...


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Apparently there is now a three way LED bulb http://www.cnet.com/products/cree-three-way-led-bulb/


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Probably. The only things that would cause you to not use an LED bulb would be that the housing is too small, the cover is too small (however you don't have to use this), or if you had a dimmer that was not compatible with the LED bulb. Given that we don't have the exact dimensions of your housing and cover, my advise would be buy a bulb and try it out. ...


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We have the newer ceiling fans which take the tiny bulbs w/tiny screws, so we bought four adapters to take traditional light bulbs. However, they have a power limiter on the fan light unit where if you put more than 160 total watts in there, the whole thing won't work. So, we bought LED bulbs that look like the traditional bulbs & have the same screw ...


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The LED bulbs emit electricity from only one side, unlike fl which are two sided. Your LED bulbs are shorting out. you have to remove the ballast in your fixture (or just cut the wires) and to replace the sockets in your fixture (from shunted to non-shunted). suggest you find an electrician experienced with LED or look on youtube for how to install linear ...


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There shouldn't be any dangers if you use a dimmer that's designed for LED lights. There are different types of dimmers for different types of lights. See this page from Lutron for a rough idea. Basically, most modern dimmers rapidly modulate between on/off and is safe for long term use in a low state. A side effect however, is that it may generate RF ...


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Many dimmers need a minimum wattage load to function. Four of the LEDs is 29.2W and is probably too low for the dimmer. The single remaining halogen alone is 39W (I assume it worked with the dimmer alone) so it's close. Try replacing the dimmer with one designed for LEDs.


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Yes, this is induction. It's caused by having a phase wire running not directly near the neutral (if they are near each other they cancel each other out). This can happen if some other power-carrying wire is separated, and also the switched wire you are concerned about. (You can cancel the effect in either place, so you need two of them. Or a UK ring ...


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There is a lot of misinformation in the answers provided, in regards to LED bulbs. The difference between PAR & BR LED bulbs is minimal, and mostly cosmetic. Basically, the PAR bulb has a flat surface, while a BR bulb has a rounded surface. Given the same lumens, the same size, the same color temperature and the same lumens per watt, it really does not ...


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If you got the halos at big box just go back and ask them to find compatible connectors and snip your LED connectors off. I would do it this way so that you can reuse for other light kits. Note: The connectors are proprietary HALO. I suggest contacting them and saying that you have messed a few up from their light kit and recessed housing. The might send ...


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I've done a few projects like this. My guess is that 10 meters is probably too far apart to get results, though it depends on the copper thickness on the strip that you have. I'd hook them all together in a strip and then just add in the +5V and gnd connections every 5 meters; this powers the strips from both ends. You might get away with 10 meters if you do ...


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The power rating of the supply must be higher than the power rating of the load -- so based on the numbers, yes, this seems sensible. However, the strip lights themselves will not support running that much current through them -- which means you can't just daisy-chain all the strips lights. From https://www.pololu.com/product/2547: The 60 LED 1 m strip ...


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I had the same problem of blinking LED lights on a Modified Sine Wave (MSW) inverter. I changed my LEDs to the dimmable type and they seem to handle the harmonics in a better way. The blinking has stopped.



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