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I had a similar problem -- I put in two tile showers, and I didn't want water to leak down behind the trim ring or even have steam from the shower get inside the wall. Considering how much labor we expend to prevent water from getting into the floor or walls of a tiled shower, it didn't make sense to me to leave a 6" diameter hole under the trim ring or one ...


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That's a typical monobloc tap (faucet) with a C-shaped washer and a retaining nut. You can cheaply buy special long tubular wrenches specifically designed for this job. Double ended - fits four different sizes. The connecting hoses usually have a small thread at the tap end with a rubber o-ring. They can often be unscrewed by hand once the lower end is ...


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I am an amateur but it looks to me like it just needs an O ring and new plastic ring like the video below shows. under kitchen sink diagram http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/how-to-repair-a-spray-hose-1.jpg looks like it needs an "O" ring and silicone grease. http://citykitchensseattle.com/tag/kitchen-faucets-leaking-at-base I had no experience at all and ...


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Your options: 1) Add perimeter baseboard hot water heat units. Just re-route the existing master bath feed to these baseboard units. 2) Add perimeter electric units. This would be more expensive in the long run as electricity is more expensive than gas. Plus the installation would require added wiring. You could also opt for under tile electric heat. 3) ...


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An HVAC technician should be able to repair the line, assuming the rest of the line is in good shape. Refrigerant line repair is not a diy project, as it requires specialized tools and training, as well as a license in most places. After the leak is repaired, you'll have to recharge the system. Which also is not a project for a typical diyer.


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While you might be able to find an epoxy our something else out on the market your best option is replace the valve. If it was a failure in the casting process then you'll never be sure that another part of the valve won't fail. While it might be a pain it would be better to just replace it and have the peace of mind that you shouldn't have any future issues....


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You either dissemble it from its closest union, or start cutting. If it leads to a pump, I'd advise installing unions at both ends of it, to facilitate replacements. Simply tightening this pipe probably isn't the way to go. It's likely deteriorated at the threads and that's why it's leaking. You'll risk snapping it off in the fitting to get it watertight ...


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I know it's in the comments, but I feel it's important enough to place in an answer: Never EVER throw water on a fire that is , or might be, oil or gasoline - based! If your furnace does not have an automatic thermal cutoff valve on the fuel line inlet, you're out of code (at least in Massachusetts), and should definitely have a plumber install one. Keep ...


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From reading all that you wrote, including the update, it is clear that there is an oil leak somewhere in the furnace mechanism or in the fuel line leading up to the furnace. You should continue to keep the furnace off until you can get an oil furnace repair professional in to take a detailed look at what has gone wrong and get it fixed properly. You will ...


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Turn off your house main, while fixing this. It would behoove you to plan this when no other household members need water. And prepare to do it quickly. I recently had a similar problem, but my house shutoffs didn't work either. I had to call a plumber, who called the town, and shut off the water to my house at the street, while the plumber replaced both ...


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I would recommend fixing the leak. If it is an old faucet there are rebuild kits that make this very easy. If it is old enough that it is not a freeze resistant type (where the actual valve is well inside the house) you should probably replace it. There are plenty of videos online that will walk you through the process of rebuilding a valve with parts ...


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You could probably use a shutoff like this one as a temporary solution. If it's still "temporary" when you winterize, I would remove it then. Edit to add why it's temporary (as requested via comment). Why is it a temporary solution? Its a quick way to stop the leak, but doesn't take freezing cycles into account. Outdoor valves are typically "frost ...


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OK for me this happened when replacing a cartridge on a moen kitchen sink faucet -- gushing water! Turns out that the instructions list the "alignment angle" as having one large hole at the top, and the two smaller holes at the bottom. But on my faucet it was the large hole at about 5 o'clock so I inserted it to match and voila, no leaks. That was scary ...


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This is definitely a Moen shower valve, with a common Moen cartridge. There is no "seat" per se. You can perform a simple replacement of the cartridge and it should solve your problem. First you need to shut off the hot and cold water supply. If you look closely, there is a horseshoe shaped retaining clip with a small hole at the top of the inverted "U", ...


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if you mean you have water coming from the handle part of the shower (this is the mixing valve), then it needs removal and repair. could be anything wrong, but its usually the front seal on these cartridges. this unit looks like it has the diverter in the mixing handle, so the whole unit probably needs repair. if you mean the water comes from a tub filler ...


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That is commonly called a kitchen sink strainer or basket strainer. You should start by soaking the parts that you can see in the picture with a penetrating spray lube, the kind that says "helps loosen rusted parts". You will need to disconnect the plumbing from the strainer by removing both the metal and the plastic slip-joint nuts. Then remove the ...



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