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I was running into the same problem of a small leak around the sink neck and gasket. It seemed to be from culmination of many things - poor sink neck, slightly crooked angle of connecting pipes and my tightening the plastic screw nut too much. So, I did run some plumbers putty around the gasket prior to screwing it in place (wow, that was much easier than ...


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Cut the valve out and get a sharkbite slip-fitting. Saddle valves eventually leak at the rubber-pipe intersection. Doing it this way doesn't require you to completely drain the line -- a skilled plumber can do a copper sweat job in 30 minutes, but you can do this in 5 minutes with a hacksaw, though a tubing cutter is preferred. ...


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If you clean the the caulk of and use 100% silicone caulk and your tube or walls do not move more than they are suppose to (natural flexing is ok), then you should have no problems with water at the caulked joint. That is if you caulk properly with 100% silicone caulk on a properly prepped surface, your water is coming from somewhere else. If it is flexing ...


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After a lot of thinking, and reading discussions here and here, I've decided that the augeries are not good. Basically, having the flange would have meant that when (not if) the caulking fails the water would still naturally flow back into the bath. But, with no flange, the water will go wherever it wants to (and homeowners know water always wants to go ...


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I have an American Standard Cadet 2-handle faucet which does precisely the same thing. And don't feel lonely, I do the same as you too. lol I bet the final pesky dripping has to do with the associated residual layer of water on the inside of the pipes after the handles are turned off. Just like an upended ketchup bottle which is empty enough to no longer ...


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After sealing the leak with some silicone adhesive-sealant, I refilled the tub and ran the pump. I noticed that there is no leak until I run the pump, and it gets noticeably worse when I turn on the jets. I believe that the leak is coming from one of the jet fittings (probably a worn-out gasket). Since there is no leak when the water is just sitting in ...


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Inside the humidifier, there should be a pan that the drain hose connects to. There's only a few possibilities I can think of, for water to reach the location you've highlighted. Leaking connection between drain and filter frame Check the connection between the drain fitting and the filter frame. Make sure the drain fitting is properly attached and aligned ...


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My suggestion is that you take a look at that plastic bulkhead fitting closely. The drain hose is attached and clamped in place with a nylon tie wrap. Upon inspection you will likely see that if the hose were removed the outer portion of that bulkhead fitting would screw off like a nut. The rest of the fitting projects through from the inside. There would be ...


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Our humidifier leaks in a similar manner, but the only way I could figure it out was to run the humidifier and watch for it (sounds awfully boring). I tracked it down to a tiny leak in the spout that feeds the overflow tube. The drops were running down the tube and leaking off the lowest point (where it curves), which was a few inches away from the ...


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I'm a bit confused how did you get to the conclusion that crack could appear after a bubble? I’m not saying you are wrong but not sure how you have concluded this. Anyway unless there are some other cracks this is 99% sure the reason why your tub is leaking. And if there is some more cracks or problems this is one of them for sure.


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A third possible (but unlikely) source of the water in your attic: There's no cap on the roof vent in your picture. So any rain that hits the open end will run down inside the vent line to the drain. In the process it could collect in any horizontal runs that aren't sloped correctly. Add sloppy glue on joints "that only carry gases" and you've got a time ...


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I went up onto the roof and looked at the vents. The rubber around the pipe was cracked with large gaps on both. I added outdoor rated caulking to reseal them. Edit - We had a good rain yesterday (3in + with periods of heavy downpour as well as gentle soaking). I had placed some plastic sheeting under the vent in the attic above the bathroom. The ...


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JBweld's WaterWeld epoxy works wet, and can be used for potable water tanks. http://www.jbweld.com/products/waterweld-epoxy-putty



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