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2

This will not solve your issue, but I would strongly suggest to stop using that shower if you can, and open the drywall where you see the leak. For two reasons: It'll help you see where the water is coming from. It will help dry out the wall and help prevent or slow down molding. That part of the drywall is no longer needed anyways because you'll have ...


5

If you're seeing that water on the drywall on the other side of the wall opposite where the tile is then your shower was not installed with a proper membrane. You need a waterproof memberane and a suitable substrate for the shower. This would be something like kerdi and/or a tile backerboard painted with redgard. You cannot use drywall to back it, nor can ...


1

Frankly, replacing one horizontal run like that probably isn't worth the effort, unless there will be lots of rain in the future. It may well be sufficient to strip, putty the gaps, caulk the edges, and paint. Otherwise, you'll have to replace the siding panel. Remove the bench and wall. Remove the siding, and renew. The tools and materials are ...


0

posting an "answer" so i can address all 3. it can't be the air conditioner, because it's still happening. and because it happened in the summer too, i crossed out "hot water moving thru cold pipes." that's why i noted that it's been happening over at least 5 months. the sanity check is funny! i know when it started and my folks were here, i immediately ...


1

Sanity check: Are you sure it's actually dripping? Hot-water pipes expanding/contracting due to temperature changes can sound very similar to a drip as they slip/stop/slip against their supports, and that's more likely at this time of year when the difference between a pipe with hot water flowing through it and one that's been sitting for a while is more ...


1

If it occurs during summer, and days when you run your air conditioner, its likely they fed the condensation drain pan to the house drain. Try turning off your AC for a whole day and see if you ever hear it. Its also possible that its someone else's AC unit that is drained to your drain, or in a multi-unit building, the common drain that happens to run ...


0

A small leak can drip for a LONG time before it shows on the other side of drywall, particularly if the drywall is double-layer firecode (as may be the case in an apartment building, depending on local codes.) One possibility is that this is a condensation drip of some sort - from a dryer duct or bathroom vent fan duct. Then again, it could be coming from ...


0

Go into the attic next time it rains. Look around for a leak above the places it leaks in the house. Additionally, sometimes leaks will "travel down" a rafter a bit before dripping down, so check your raters for water trails, and follow them!


0

Installing a proper threshold will reduce or eliminate water infiltration under the door. Notice that water would have to flow uphill in order to pass these adjustable height thresholds: The lower one has a sill extension, the upper does not. Products of this type are available for both in-swinging and out-swinging doors.


2

Moisture pooling in the joints like that suggests standing water in the pipe, which will eventually rust it out for sure. If this is the case, there's probably a blockage of some sort downstream that's resulting in sewage backup (ew). I would definitely address that first. After that, you can decide whether or not it's worth replacing pipe. My guess is that ...


3

Cast Iron drain pipe with Bell fittings, these are packed with oakum and overlaid with hot poured lead driven in place to seal and then a second layer poured in to complete the seal. It may only need the lead driven in to repack the oakum and a new layer of lead poured. Contact a plumber with knowledge about old drain systems, cast iron can take a long ...


1

I would recommend against using 2 wax rings due to the increased possibility of leaks. Short of hiring a plumber to raise the flange, there are products like this that allow you to raise the flange and still follow building codes.


1

The future health of the system can only be insured by gutting it. However, you're paying insurance; who cares? I don't really know the ins-and-outs of insurance but perhaps you should send them a letter recommending that they do replace the whole system; providing leverage for you to stand on when it breaks in the future and they want to raise your rate ...


0

I believe that you are getting leaks through that gap. Wind driven ran can push water right under that flashing. You can install sealant underneath the flashing like Aravindakshan K suggested. I would take it a step further, and add roofing nails with the neoprene washers on them to hold the flashing closer to the roof. I have the same problem with my ...


0

It sounds like I have the same system and I work with an ex-plumber. The faucet stems have that nut around the handle area (about where the chrome sleeve screws onto) that you don't quite know what it's for. He claims if you back that off a little it will allow the washer to sit on the seat tighter and seal off leaks. BUT it's a fine line and may leak there ...


4

It is not sealed with petroleum jelly but a beveled slip washer. You can try to tighten the nut on the p-trap where the black pvc enters the copper p-trap. If that does not work, you will need to get a new 1 1/2 beveled slip joint washer. Your big box home improvement stores carry them as do any plumbing supply houses. They also make rubber washers for ...



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