New answers tagged

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Leaks in that model have been found in the tubing embedded within the foam. Search the web for answers. I know I've seen photos of this. Yes you will have to dig out the foam, repair the leak or cap off the tubing, then use spray can foam to replace what you've removed.


1

There should be a mounting nut on the faucet stem which holds the faucet from below (under the counter). You will need to shut off water heater AND the water to the heater, and disconnect the supply pipes. Take the mounting nut off and pull the faucet out. When you look inside you will find something similar to the armature for pop-up drain plugs (I think). ...


1

Here in the UK one would normally use a compression repair coupler to repair a copper water pipe. Normally because it's burst but it would work just as well after removing that (presumablly) redundant and leaky valve. The repair coupler is longer than a normal coupler and only one end has a depth stop which makes it easy to slide onto a gap in existing ...


0

"1/4 turn ball valves have plastic seals at each side of the ball with a hole in it. Many times the valve can be tightened (not the stem) but the end that threads into the body to tighten them up and stop the leak. Not all are built this way but most metal ones are. when you removed the fitting it may have loosened causing the leak." I agreed with this. ...


3

There are basically two solutions: 1. Remove the saddle valve and replace with a coupling You need to do this if it is leaking from the rubber flashing around the pipe. 2. Cap the Valve You can unscrew the valve stem retaining nut and cap the top and side of the valve with compression nuts as described above. You can do this if, for instance, the valve ...


5

There were some good suggestions to replace/remove the saddle valve, and I'll likely do that eventually. For now, though, I was able to cap it off with a 1/4" compression cap, similar to the one pictured below.


2

If you remove that, water is going to spray everywhere. You might be able to find a cap to screw onto it at the local hardware store. If it's at the end of the pipe you can easily fix it by: Turning off the water Purchase a pipe cutter (sort of looks like the letter C) and costs about $16.00 USD Purchase a 3/4" or 1/2" Shark bite connector. Around $5.00 ...


6

It's a self-piercing saddle valve like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB76LXrYKsU . If you're familiar with electronics, it works a lot like the so-called "vampire tap" for coax cable. Regardless, it's a quick and easy solution in the short-term, but they tend not to last. Because they are cheap, they tend to fail easily, and because they are ...


10

Turn the water off, and remove it. Those things are rubbish, and always leak eventually. If you need a valve there, cut out the damaged section of pipe, and install a proper tee and valve. If you don't need it, cut out the damaged section of pipe and install a coupling. If you're not an expert solderer, They make push-fit fittings (SharkBite® is the well ...


3

It's a self tapping valve, usually to provide water to a fridge. You can either replace it or eliminate it (use a coupling instead).


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Get a pipe cap. This is normal with shut-off valves that are not exercised for many years. You only really need it to slow down flow enough to change and tighten the connecting piping. Sometimes that's all you can hope for. That said, we've been on a campaign to replace every one in the facility, but it's almost futile - we'll have the same problem again ...


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To find the leak use dish soap and water in a spray bottle. Either tighten fitting or loosen fitting, apply pipe dope to threads, tighten and retest for leaks. The good thing is the gas company will come out and at least locate the problem for you. They will repair if minor. That would be my choice since they have the proper leak detection tools and ...


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Your first answer from Been There is the correct action. Shut off your water, undo the fitting, clean off corrosion, apply Teflon pipe dope to threads and retighten. If you still have a leak and have some pipe to work with, cut off the compression ring on the end and install a new compression ring and do the same.


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Your other option is to ditch compression fittings and learn how to sweat (solder) copper pipe. Or if you do have a plumber come out, have them replace every accessible compression fitting with sweat fittings that will never leak ever again. Compression fittings are prone to leakage, even when they aren't eating away your pipes with galvanic action, as you ...


0

There are alternatives to try first before spending more money. See this link... http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-quiet-noisy-water-pipes.html If these methods do not work for you install a water hammer arrester. See... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z0Tb1SdFGk


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The fitting must be disassembled, cleaned and then apply teflon pipe dope to the threads and tighten snug. Once snug turn 3/4 turn and stop. Over tightening compression fittings will damage the collar under the nut and the pipe. If this does not work the pipe and collar may be damaged and need to be replaced.


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Wrapping externally with teflon tape wouldn't help. Teflon™ doesn't stick to anything; the only reason it works when used properly (wrapped on threads before assembly) is that it's squeezed tightly between the external and internal threads (using Teflon reduces friction so the joint can still be fully tightened). The leak is at a compression fitting. ...


0

No. "Teflon tape" is used on the threads of joints, not to seal leaks outside of joints. It's not adhesive like tape, so it wouldn't stick to the outside of the pipe at all. If you don't know what you're doing, I'd bring in someone who does. Based on the amount of corrosion, it looks like it's been leaking for some time. It could be as simple as ...


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Municipal water meters are positive displacement meters as they are the most accurate at low and high flow rates. If the supply is shut off for a prolonged period of time (several hours) it is likely that water in the pipes will be drained by consumers trying to get as much water from the supply as they can. The result is air filled pipes. When the supply is ...


-4

Try wet switch flood detector http://www.amazon.com/DiversiTech-WS-1-Switch-Flood-Detector/dp/B004JPDO8W


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if the compression nut is tight, then you should not have a leak. dont put teflon on a compression joint face. you can, if desperate pull it apart and coat everything with a good layer of pipe dope and then reassemble. sometimes you may have a little corroded pore that this can fix. might be time to replace the supply line, nut and ferrule. other ...


1

I agree with Daniel. Unfortunately, roofing companies make more money installing new roofs than they do fixing leaks. They will probably recommend a new roof. If you roof is still in good condition otherwise, you may be better off hiring a handyman to find your leak. Good luck!



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