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2

What the contractor is "full of" is excellent advice. If you really want to spend money like you have a firehose connected to your wallet, dig out around the outside of the house to the footings and put drains there which slope out to daylight (or a sump if you want to be beholden to a sump, and its pump forever) - and coat the walls while you have it open, ...


0

I would replace the supply line with a flex line this will give you a new nut and seal and the flex ones don't have as many problems as the solid lines. These are cheap and easy to replace.


0

The tube comes in through the fridge into the filter system pull the filter and one screw and the hole tube can be removed.


0

Get the occupant upstairs to install a proper shower tray and pipe the water out from the shower drain straight through the pipes and out of the building. Concrete will always absorb then release water eventually but the shower tray and piping system (Without leaks)is waterproof. This is the cheapest and permanent solution.


1

As it turned out, there was no leak between the tank and the bowl, but it was a crack in the closet bend. When I looked into the closet bend, I could see what looked like a crack or pitting, but I didn't expect it to be the source of the leak, because it didn't leak when I poured water over it. Having exhausted other options, I decided to try fixing it ...


-2

One thing's for sure: Turn off the gas to the heater. The pipe may still be connected, and you're not smelling anything, but that pipe is still pumping gas into the heater. That's a MAJOR safety hazard, and if I were you, I'd get an electric heater, unless you have no other choice but to get a gas heater.


1

These are all signs that the tank has corroded through. Looks like you should be in the market for a new hot water tank.


3

I would replace the entire sillcock (also called a stopcock, outdoor faucet, hose faucet, or spigot), because it looks like you lost the handle, too; in which case you should watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj_nTbIWzfI, Or if you really intend to repair it, try this instead: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cALQ3PR7k30 Edit- One ...


1

The yellow thing is the fill valve. It is the thing the water actually enters the tank through. There are few different ways they can work but in your example the large yellow body probably houses a float that closes the valve once the water level reaches the appropriate height. The large, black, vertical tube is the overflow tube and at its base is flap. ...


1

Is your toilet stool broken? There seems to be a serious crack as indicated in this snip: If this is a crack as it appears it may be wise to replace the toilet seat as well. Cracks in the toilet seat can lead to water leakage down under the toilet and into the building structure below. This is something to be concerned about as wet wood invites mold and ...


4

Sounds like you need to replace the flush valve and possibly the shut off valve. If you believe you have the water shut off, and you still have a drip, then the shutoff valve is corroded enough to jam before it is fully off. The flush valve is pretty obviously malfunctioning. Replace both of these and you should be back to normal. Good luck!


1

I had a similar problem once but the leak was visible and the outside of the toilet bowl was wet. Flushing from the tank produced leakage but flushing with a bucket did not. It sounds like clean flush water is somehow escaping on its way from the flush valve to the toilet bowl. This could be from a misaligned tank fitting or a crack in the ceramic material. ...


0

Leaks in that model have been found in the tubing embedded within the foam. Search the web for answers. I know I've seen photos of this. Yes you will have to dig out the foam, repair the leak or cap off the tubing, then use spray can foam to replace what you've removed.



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