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15

First, let me state that I am NOT a fan of laminate flooring. Laminate flooring comes in a wide variety of quality levels, from extremely poor to fairly good, but share a common trait. They are always a "picture" of wood on some pressed paper or synthetic backing. They can be miserable to work with, easily damaged and almost impossible to repair after ...


11

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet, but I've always heard it is better to install laminate flooring perpendicular to the floor joists in the room. Often the subfloor can be slightly unlevel due to high points running along the joists and low points halfway between the joists. If your laminate flooring is parallel to the joists, it will simply follow ...


10

It is fine to temporarily store the flooring in a cool dry place, However, You will need to bring it into the climate in which it will be installed for a few days so that it will acclimate to the conditions before installation.


10

First of all, I disagree with your orientation. But, it is your choice, and I'll respect that. You may want to read this: http://diy.blogoverflow.com/2012/09/installing-laminateengineered-wood-floating-floors/ Pay close attention to the pre-measuring, so that you avoid having a 1 inch board running along either wall. The idea is that you never want to ...


9

At the risk of sounding like an old school hold back, I gotta weigh in on laminate flooring. I have installed thousands of square feet of various wood and laminate flooring. Even though the new laminates tout the hard durable finishes and long warranties, the common weakness of laminate is that it is a picture of wood on some type of paper or synthetic base. ...


9

Pick up a kit like this from your local hardware store, it will include every thing you need. Make sure you measure the room and make sure the last row is not going to be a tiny sliver, it is better to start with a thinner first row than get to the end and realize you are going to have a really thin last row. Also be very careful when tapping the boards ...


8

Having done this a few times before, I'd like to stress the importance of crayons -- they come in lots of contrasting colors, so you can see them easily, and they buff off so no one sees the marks when you're done. We found a 3-person crew was about right for working -- two people dealt with laying the full boards (one hammered while the other one made sure ...


8

Great question! My wife and I were examining laminate flooring a little while ago too. Not all of them are alike -- here are some things to consider. Check the warranty. Cheaper laminate will usually have a shorter warranty with more conditions (e.g. 10 - 15 years only protecting factory defects). More expensive laminate will usually cover more ...


7

While I disagree with your orientation, this isn't really that hard as long as you're using a floating floor. Start by running a line of boards across all three rooms, and orient them so they are as perpendicular as possible to all the walls. (Alternatively snap a chalk line to represent the left edge of that single line of boards. Now in each room, ...


6

This online store has them for $15.90 each, and claims to be compatible with Dremel Multi-Max. EDIT: Taking shirlock's advice in mind, the right tool for the job can make all the difference. I did a bit of searching, and DeWalt has an angle grinder for pretty cheap - only 4x the cost of the multimax blade! Ryobi has one for about half that price too. ...


6

The instructions for the last type of laminate flooring I installed actually recommended not selecting the direction based on the longer dimenension of the room, but based on how much light is coming in from each wall, and to select it so the planks ran perpendicular to the wall with the most light. If you're going to break the floor and rotate it at the ...


6

When we did this, we purchased edging to match the laminate. The edging snaps into a channel, which can be attached to the floor - either glued or screwed, depending on the sub floor. I found after a couple of years the edging came up a bit, but a bit of glue in the channel fixed that.


6

If you don't have any heavy duty canvas type drop cloths, then use a couple of layers of red rosin paper. Tape the seams and around the perimeter to hold it in place. Keep an eye on it and tape or put an extra piece on any areas that get ripped. Red Rosin is much better than plastic as it is not slippery to walk on and is fairly tough for foot traffic.


5

If it's a floating laminate floor (i.e. it isn't glued to the floor, but just rests on a foam underlay or padding) then you shouldn't attach the flooring to the walls at any point. You can cover the spaces around the edges of the walls with baseboard, but this should just rest on the floor, not be connected to it in any way. This is because a floating floor ...


5

I have just recently tackled the same problem with my own hallway. The solution I did was as follows. I cut a piece so that it would fit the door opening and a little more, so that it will go under the door frame. I have cut this piece so that on one side there is still the laminate "click" side, while the other is naturally cut off (this is piece 2 in the ...


5

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ...


4

One way of accomplishing this is to undercut the brick and slide the flooring in underneath. Two advantages are that the brick ends up holding down your floating floor, and you end up with a very clean looking transition between the brick and laminate. To do this, you'd of course need something that can cut brick. You could potentially use an angle ...


4

A lot has been written about this subject. I am of the camp, like Tester 101, that laminate flooring is a poor choice for kitchens and bathrooms. Keep in mind that laminate flooring is a pressed paper/composite backing with a "picture" of the finish on top. Granted, laminate has come a long way and the surface durability of the better brands is quite good ...


4

Either way will work. My first impression would be to try to remove the old lino, especially since there is so little of it. If it turns out it too difficult, then simply remove all the loose lino, lay down your foam underlayment and go right over the whole mess. Good luck.


4

That looks like the chip is in the transition piece and not the floor boards. For the best results, just replace the entire piece. It doesn't look like it matches exactly anyways, so just try to find something very close. If you know where the floors came from you might get really lucky and end up with the identical part. It is likely glued in place, ...


4

The most common approach to dealing with flooded surfaces is to blow air across them. The constantly changing air absorbs moisture. Commercial companies use very high volume fans, but any fan should help. If you can exhaust the air from the room, the moisture level in the air should drop and more water will be absorbed from the floor. Use of a dehumidifier ...


4

I think you should be more concerned with the expansion gap than other types of expansion. In my opinion you should use some kind of separation between the living room and the bedrooms, because bigger rooms require bigger expansion gaps. And that difference in expansion could give some bowing.


4

Most molding (skirting board) is 3/8" thick. You need a 1/4 inch gap around the floor to allow for expansion due to moisture. So if you're going up right against the drywall, you'll have a problem with getting molding thick enough to cover it (minor variations in the gap WILL show). One alternative is to buy the stuff they sell as window/door casing which ...


3

Concrete wicks water, so even if the membrane under your screed layer is undamaged, if any moisture gets into that layer it's going to be redistributed as evenly as possible throughout that layer. What you don't want to do, with a DPM under the screed, is create a moisture trap - which a second DPM would do. Instead of a membrane, use a foam underlayment ...


3

I learned that you should install hardwood flooring with the long edge parallel to the long dimension of the space it's being installed in. I expect laminate flooring would be the same. This would be for the whole house, not just one room. I definitely wouldn't change directions at the entry to the hallway.


3

With a longer hallway I would also consider how square the hall is. If it is out a couple of inches over a long span, and you run the boards along the wall, one side of the hall is going to have boards that get thinner or wider. In this case I would personally run it across the hall. I'm a fan of running the boards separate directions in the living room ...


3

Since each room in your house will have different temp and humidity levels, the T moulding allows each room to contract, expand, and flex independently of the others. This helps prevent warping and cracking.


3

I know I've seen stain grade wood grilles that could be flushed to the floor. I doubt they were 8mm, but you may be able to rout the subfloor to make up the difference or and/or bevel the grille edges. You would stain and finish to match, but you won't be able to perfectly match the stain. It's unlikely it's even the same wood specie. This wouldn't bother ...


3

Buy yourself a steel ruler long enough for the job, and a few quick release clamps. Just clamp the ruler and tile to a workbench and score along the ruler with a utility knife. It's a bit slower, but for a single room, the savings is significant. As well, you should only be cutting the edges that go against the wall. Remove the quarter round and ...



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