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0

Is it safe? No for a few reasons: Chance of surrounding objects to catch fire (if not they will be damaged). Food not getting cooked properly (oven may not be able to achieve desired temp). You suffer from constant heat exposure. Your wallet will kill you (if the above doesn't do you in first). The insulation is there for 2 reasons: Keep the heat in ...


13

Um...in a word...ABSOLUTELY NOT!! You should without a doubt get the proper replacement insulation and put it back same as it came from the factory.


1

Answers in order: 1) If the kitchen was done properly in the 90's you definitely should have GFI protection, at least near the sink(s). If not then yes, you cetainly can install a GFI at the head of the circuit and protect downstream standard receptacles. Keep in mind, only receptacles serving countertop areas require GFI protection. 2) IF the house is ...


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I think you need to treat this almost like a piece of flooring. I disagree with using thinset. I see two problems with that. First your sheets are too large. Second the board will be so rigid that it might lead to more dents. I would use 1/2 inch plywood like a high end granite install. Then I would glue down some foam flooring underlayment. Then ...


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I would handle this as a tile countertop. Instead of small 4x4 tiles you will be working with the larger slate sheets. This means, 3/4 plywood down as a base. Cement board on top of that and then thin set to attach the tiles. You can then trim the outsides in whatever you want. It can be wood, tile or metal. You can also use the slate cut into smaller ...


1

The only way would be to actually disconnect all the piping and reconfigure your set-up so that the disposer is on the "main sink" side. It should actually be fairly simple to do, but it is a lot of hard work on your back under the cabinet. Removing and re-setting the disposer is not rocket science but if you have not done it before or are unfamiliar with ...


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You should get a thin cutting board or disc. Slide it in then add a little pressure until it comes out


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My drawer would only open about 3 inches but then there was the lip of the cutlery tray to contend with. I tried a plastic flexible cutting board as suggested above, a wire coat hanger and a wooden ruler but they were all too short. In the end I got a long wood saw and managed to slide it in from the side where I knew the drawer was stuck. I swished it ...



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