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I would recommend neither in this case. I would use a small masonry bit and drill several holes outlining around the edges of where the new box will be and then simply use a screwdriver and tap between each hole to make a larger space. The same method works for making a large hole in a concrete block. Should be cheaper than buying or renting some tool too.


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That looks like a standard '3/8 compression x 1/2" MIP' (male iron pipe) connector. You can get it at any hardware store. Normal procedure is to cut the tubing above the fitting and install a new one. Your tubing does not look too good, you have to have fairly smooth tubing surface for the new compression fitting to be able to slide on and seal. You may ...


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What's my next move? Turn off the water supply and cut off the unservicable parts. I am not confident in my ability to thread a copper tube Look for a compression fitting the right size, a replacement pipe (e.g. Monobloc-tap tailpipes are standardized where I live) or a new faucet. You might get a more specific answer if you edit a photo into ...


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You'll want all of the adhesive off before you paint. If you want a non-chemical alternative, you can scrape off the majority a lot easier if you heat it up with a heat gun or a hair dryer. This is basically what your sander is doing through friction, except the melted adhesive is sticking to the sandpaper and smearing instead of coming off. After you get ...


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You could go with acetone or mineral spirits and a scraper to get the adhesive film gone. You would have better luck with a sander if you used a very heavy grit of paper, 36grit or 40 grit would probably work for you but you risk gouging your cabinets. The best solution for you is a chemical called Methyl Ethyl Keytone. ( usually referred to by its acronym ...


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The water company charges you based on the amount of water that flows through the water meter. The water meter doesn't know which valves are open or closed, it only knows that water is flowing through it. Most places I've lived, bill based on cubic feet of water used (1 cubic foot of water = 7.48 gallons). There's also commonly a sewer charge if you're on ...


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As to whether it is geometrically feasible, I have no idea. The question you should be asking is whether it is structurally feasible. I doubt there is any conceivable way to get a header that turns 120° and would provide enough support in the corner without a post there. I'm assuming that the dashed line is an existing wall. I would also evaluate whether ...


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Contacting a manufacturer's representative is the only way to really know what it will take to make it happen. Typically they are happy to discuss projects because it allows them to qualify sales leads.


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NO. You CANNOT extend this kitchen receptacle circuit to feed lighting. Both Canada (I believe) and the US have restrictions on this. You must find a different source to feed this lighting load. If you are removing it altogether then I would say it is probably OK, but WHY are you removing it? There is a very real chance you are creating a different violation ...


2

Before you terminate and dead end the red wire in the box there a couple of things to consider. Since there are obviously two hots providing power to a split outlet (i.e. tab removed) it does NOT necessarily mean that half the outlet is switched. It could just be that two separate circuits supply power from two circuit breakers. The red wire may come from ...


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The third insulated conductor is only called a "traveler" in the context of a three way switch (when two light switches control the same lights). In this context, the third conductor is just another hot. Usually, when two hots are connected to an outlet like that, the break-away tab is removed, and one outlet is always on while the other is switched. (the ...



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