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1

The water company charges you based on the amount of water that flows through the water meter. The water meter doesn't know which valves are open or closed, it only knows that water is flowing through it. Most places I've lived, bill based on cubic feet of water used (1 cubic foot of water = 7.48 gallons). There's also commonly a sewer charge if you're on ...


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As to whether it is geometrically feasible, I have no idea. The question you should be asking is whether it is structurally feasible. I doubt there is any conceivable way to get a header that turns 120° and would provide enough support in the corner without a post there. I'm assuming that the dashed line is an existing wall. I would also evaluate whether ...


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Contacting a manufacturer's representative is the only way to really know what it will take to make it happen. Typically they are happy to discuss projects because it allows them to qualify sales leads.


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NO. You CANNOT extend this kitchen receptacle circuit to feed lighting. Both Canada (I believe) and the US have restrictions on this. You must find a different source to feed this lighting load. If you are removing it altogether then I would say it is probably OK, but WHY are you removing it? There is a very real chance you are creating a different violation ...


2

Before you terminate and dead end the red wire in the box there a couple of things to consider. Since there are obviously two hots providing power to a split outlet (i.e. tab removed) it does NOT necessarily mean that half the outlet is switched. It could just be that two separate circuits supply power from two circuit breakers. The red wire may come from ...


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The third insulated conductor is only called a "traveler" in the context of a three way switch (when two light switches control the same lights). In this context, the third conductor is just another hot. Usually, when two hots are connected to an outlet like that, the break-away tab is removed, and one outlet is always on while the other is switched. (the ...


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We found an HVAC guy to build it from photos and measurements. With a bit of nudging, it went in after I cut the right whole in the box.


2

Single versus dual stage is easy; dual stage is essentially two single-stage filters in succession. Bulkier, more expensive. Better removal of contaminants. Installation is the same. Reverse osmosis is an entirely different technology. It generally has a prefilter because RO doesn't deal with particulates, only dissolved chemicals. It does handle those ...


1

I'd suggest searching the web for Amica maintenance instructions for your model. If there are recalibrations available at all, that's where you'll find the instructions. Normally, a service tech would just swap out the electronics and/or sensor, since if it's drifted this far there's no guarantee that it won't do other Bad Things some time soon.


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You can't untangle it easily while the hose is in place. If you can remove the hose, this becomes straightforward; rotate the sections of spring 90 degrees to each other, and it should become obvious that pushing one through the other will either disengage them or make the problem worse. If it looks like it will make the problem worse, rotate one side 180 ...


1

It's not the size of the kitchen - it's the fact that it's a kitchen. Run the coffeemaker, toaster and microwave, perhaps the waffle iron, fire up the mixer to beat the waffle batter... Even with limited counter space I'd consider 2-3 receptacles a bit under-populated for a kitchen these days. Consider using a larger box and putting a pair at each location, ...


1

Looking at the actual code... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits 210.11 Branch Circuits Required. (C) Dwelling Units. (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere ...


1

According to the NEC, any household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be served by a 40A circuit. Yours is over this so bumping up to a 50A would be required. The code on this can be confusing, but trust me, it's there. I am interested in where it says a 40A circuit is acceptable.


1

The link at the end explains the flash and gives solutions. Let me grab some excerpt from it: Why does the CFL bulb flash? "Many times this is due to the circuit inside the CFL charging up, even when the bulb is off. This happens many times when the CFL bulb is being controlled by an illuminated wall switch, because the wall switch uses the CFL bulb itself ...


2

In some places it is illegal to run hidden power cables horizontally across walls unless they are within a specific short distance from floor or ceiling. For example, in the UK I believe all power cables to/from a mid-wall switch must run vertically to or until near the floor/ceiling. So, the answer may depend where you live. Reference: IET cables in ...


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If your counter did not come with a backsplash, you could have a small one (6 inches high or so) made to match the counter and then just paint above that.


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To expand on wallyk's answer: nearly anything. It's really entirely up to you. The main two things to consider are maintainability (how easy is it to keep clean) and aesthetics (what do you like?) The range of options can include (but is not limited to): Tiles Ceramic (as you mention) glass metal stone etc Metal stainless steel copper etc ...


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I just used the 1/4 inch space I had to fit my hand through to pull a few things out and then I was able to pull the drawer in a jiffy!


3

You mean as a backsplash? Just about any material can be used: ceramic, glass, vinyl, ABS, wood, aluminum, steel, contact paper, etc. See this gallery for many ideas. While most of them are ceramic tile, which is the current fashion, look carefully and you'll see vinyls which look metallic. Here is Home Depot's version of that. We are considering that ...


1

Could be a voltage issue, but you'd notice it in other places as well if it was. Your ONLY recourse is to call the landlord and have them have someone check it. You CANNOT and should not do ANY electrical work in a place that you are renting.


0

I would check the seals on the fridge door. Perhaps they are damaged or are not closing fully. If it is an electric stove, it may be that it is of a type that you are not used to. Some electric stoves do take a longer time to reach full temperature. For example, halogen, inductive and resistive heating elements all have differing characteristics. You could ...



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