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Your model has a harvest timer. After a set freeze time, the timer should operate a hot gas reversing valve that will slightly warm the freeze surface and cause the cubes to eject by gravity. The timer or coil on the hot gas valve can fail. The harvest cycle will also drain water that wasn't used in the last cycle and refill. It seems like waste but this ...


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Try a magnet - dollars to doughnuts, those are somewhat peeled and rusted chrome plated steel, and the blue is a normal steel oxidation color, and not toxic (also, were you planning to drip food down there, scrape it off and then eat it? If not, nothing to worry about regardless.) They are stunningly unlikely to be copper, though there may be a minuscule ...


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Looks like bornite (Cu5FeS4) (yes, bornite is toxic too). But it's unlikley, unless someone spilled some sulfur in the mix. It's definitely a copper mineral of some kind... copper is very commonly used when plating chrome. Revised answer: The cups are chrome plated steel. Usually chrome plating starts with copper plated to to steel, then chrome is ...


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I'm a little skeptical because of how purple those stains are, but if these drip pans are made of copper then it could well be Verdigris. This is likely happening because the plates were not sealed properly and vegetable oil was spilled and not cleaned off as heat was applied over time. If I were you I'd scrape some off (it's OK if some powder comes into ...


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I would have no concern building this with the right fasteners. There are plenty of really nice, self-tapping, nearly indestructible construction screws to be had (random example). The key joints are at the back of the shelf, where the vast majority of the torsional stress occurs. Use whatever decorative fasteners you like at the front. Put two 4" ...


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Decking/framing screws have breaking point that I wouldn't trust for this, and if that is drywall behind the shelf, then it can crush. If you could cut through the drywall (if it is drywall) then you could mount directly to the wall studs. 1/4" lag screws should be sturdy enough for a person to stand on it (or maybe not, but it will be strong). You should ...


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If you fill out a form, from kinetico, or call the local kinetico dealer they may offer a free test (hoping they can sell you a system). In fact, you might want or need something they have.


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My take is that the sheer thickness of the shelves that you propose will look heavy and chunky to the point of being unattractive. I would also have concerns about the overall sturdiness of a shelf that is cantilevered off a single 2x4 screwed to the wall. If it were me I would go for a thinner style of assembly and use vertical end sides on the shelves.


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If you are in the US, I would suggest contacting your country's agricultural extension office. They often offer soil and water testing at reasonable prices, of know who does.


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You could accomplish hanging a total of 8 kgs of pans on a 2.5 meter long tube of 25.4mm diameter x 1.2mm thickness. I assume this is the cheapest option, but it might be more susceptible to failure in the long run than your other listed options. Supposing that it was mounted well, it could withstand a good amount of static force... based on my familiarity ...


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Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


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April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


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Quartz weigh's 16-20 lbs per sq. ft. depending if it's 3/4" or 1-1/4". You will be fine with attaching a strip of 3/4" x 2" depth plywood or solid wood strips on all three wall sides and then slide the quartz into place for 1-1/4" (3cm) thickness, all four sides need support for 3/4" (2cm) thickness. I am a professional fabricator of 19 years.


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The countertop guys will laugh at you if you want to span quartz over a 5' span. Basically quartz and granite can barely span a dishwasher width - meaning we get buy with not having plywood over the counters. And that is given nothing heavy is stored on it on that section. Given you will have a washer and dryer below it, I would protect it. Since if a ...


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2011 code has nothing on the subject. However it is clear the purpose of the rules therein is to keep you from draping cords across sinks. That seems like a very good idea. Code requires outlets anywhere there's a 12" or wider section of countertop - because that space will inevitably draw a coffeemaker or George Foreman. It's possible the inspector is ...


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Usually tops like that are built by fitting a base sheet (usually particle board for flatness and smoothness) and edging it with hardwood using miter joints. Then laminate is applied across the entire surface with contact cement. The laminate is then trimmed flush with a router, and a bevel or more detailed edge is routed into the hardwood and laminate ...


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Sounds like you need to install a new P-trap. Cut it off past the trap and then re-plumb in the correct spot. You may be able to use the old P-trap depending on where you need to cut, how it's glued, etc, but without a picture that's impossible to judge. Be sure when you cut it that you'll be able to get a new fitting on the end, that usually means at least ...


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Yes of course you can install a hardwood floor in your kitchen, you just have to wipe up any spillages and water quickly and also look at getting the correct maintenance carried out in that area more frequently.


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Step one of redoing the slab is pulling those cabinets back out. IMO, only you can define acceptable. 1-2y, eh? So, like anywhere from 5 years to "temporary-permanant"...? Just do it right or the doors won't stay closed and all your carrots will roll off. It'd be easier and better to shim the piecemeal cabinets, instead of the entire counter top along each ...


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First of all, do you in fact have PVC pipes? Lots of older houses have cast iron end-to-end, so nothing at all to worry about in that case. Even if you do have PVC, I don't think there's any serious concern, with the very slight possibility of an effect the drain trap (if any) right under the sink. While continuous immersion in 100° C water might soften ...


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PVC gets soft when heated. As Tester101 commented above, 140°F is the maximum temperature for pvc. Boiling water is 212° F. I have bent many PVC pipes with pipe heaters for running cable (schedule 80 takes about 2-3 minutes to get soft in a pipe heater). They don't bust, but they certainly can and will bend, which is obviosly not ideal for joints or ...


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Yes an undermount sink can easily be converted to a drop in sink. If you can find one that is close to spec all that you have to do is drop it in and secure with silicone. You will have a little wiggle room given that you have a lip but it might be harder than you think - as undermounts have few standard sizes/look and these are not the exact same as top ...


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you can take a pair of locking pliers (use good quality vise grips or something like that, and don't be tempted to use needle nose visegrips), the biggest pair you can get to fit, and insert the visegrips into the circular shroud. its called parrot beaking. the vise grips will stick straight out from the shroud (long axis of the pliers parallel to the axis ...


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Have you tried an open-end wrench? Such as this: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrench#/media/File%3A2008-04-14_Chrome-Vanadium_Wrenches.jpg It won't fit flat onto the nut but it looks like you could get a good grip on it at a shallow angle. The end of a spanner (adjustable wrench) is quite a bit thicker and harder to maneuver in tight spaces. ...


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Sure. But it's a bad idea, because kitchens are wet and have people walking around in them all the time. A wood floor will scratch and wear quickly, and be exposed to conditions that can encourage warping, rot, or mold. So ideally you want something durable and not affected by water, and probably something that's attractive, too. That pretty much leaves ...


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You can install a hardwood floor in the kitchen, but the high traffic and damage caused by dropped foods make vinyl a better choice because vinyl is water resistant and it is physically softer, resulting in fewer broken dishes, and it is much less expensive and easier to replace or cover than refinishing a hardwood floor. But, vinyl and linoleum don't have ...


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I haven't had it done, but 2 of my neighbors did. One ($3500) is 10-years old over particle board cabinets & doors with no issues & the other ($3000) is 8-years old over very old real wood, also with no issues. It's pretty close to plastic laminate countertops & those hold up for decades. If anything does pop loose or an edge lifts, you just glue ...



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