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21

Tyco makes NM splices which are concealable and acceptable under NEC for use for rewiring in an existing building. NM Cable Splices NEC 2008 334.40 Boxes and Fittings. (B) Devices of Insulating Material. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in exposed cable wiring and for rewiring ...


15

At first glance, I see several problems: The junction should be in a junction box. Is there even an electrical nut on the live wires? Hard to tell under all that electrical tape, but it doesn't look as if there's room for one. Is the neutral from the red wire at top going into that tangle of lives? If it's carrying live, it should be tagged to indicate ...


12

The NEC says that all electrical junctions have to be accessible (and your profile indicates that you're either in Nevada or New Mexico, both of which have adopted the NEC), so you can't legally hide a junction behind the wall. Probably the easiest route for you would be to install a retrofit gang box to the left of the stud with the other gang box (if ...


8

The answer to your first question is YES. You need to have the junction in a box. Can you mount the box higher on the roof or a rafter or a gable end stud? if you don't have enough wire, then practically speaking, the box will have to live under the insulation. Technically it is not enclosed as in being sheetrocked over, so it is not a code violation in an ...


6

I'm amazed that your inspector didn't call this out. I suppose it could be just a random fluke that it was missed, but this is something that even the greenest inspector should have easily seen and noted. I agree with all of Niall C.'s points, but would add that this looks like nothing a professional electrician would put together (and would certainly not ...


6

Modern recessed lights have junction boxes built in. Similarly on a new work recessed fixture You are free to daisy-chain other lights or receptacles, so long as you connect properly and do not exceed the number of wires for the size of the built in box. A chart to calculate this can be found here.


6

You ask for a box, as long as 120V does not go thru, then you can use a low voltage cut-in ring. These rings come in 1,2,3 and 4 gang or even round. You can use a 1 gang weatherproof cover with either 1 1/2 hub or 3 hubs. Or you can buy a blank plate and drill your own 7/8. Weatherproof plate with 3 1/2 hubs To make where your cable goes thru the ...


5

This is not really an answer (well it sort of is), I just wanted to clear some things up from the comments. First those little tabs covering the holes in plastic boxes, they are NOT knockouts. They are clamps. You push the cable into the box past the clamps, then the clamps prevent the cable from being pulled out of the box. They can be a pain in the ...


5

According to the National Electrical Code (NEC), there are only two factors that limit you. Conductor box fill If you're working with standard sized boxes, you can use Table 314.16(A) to determine the number of conductors allowed in a box. If you're using non-standard boxes, you'll have to make the calculations yourself. Basically, it works like ...


3

Uh - you can't seal up the wall. You have to leave that junction box accessible. Right guys?


3

It looks good, but the romex sheath on the bottom cable has to come into the box for it to be correct. I can't see that area to make that call, but if you have sheath then you have done good.


3

Something has to be different than what you say for this scenario to occur in a house that's wired in a manner even approaching code compliance. The voltage drop on the outlet while the fan is on is normal. The fan is simply using some of the power of the circuit, decreasing the remaining potential elsewhere in the circuit. You say that the voltage changes ...


3

It's acceptable to leave wire in the walls. The only thing you need to do is leave the ends exposed in boxes and wire nut and tape the to legs together. That will indicate to an electrician what's going on, and if someone does try to tie into them in the future it will just pop the breaker.


2

There's nothing in National Electrical Code about removing abandoned electrical cable. If it's communication, television, radio, etc. cable, you have to remove the accessible portion of the cables. If it's wire in a raceway (conduit, cables trays, etc.), you do have to remove it. Connecting the ungrounded (hot), grounded (neutral), and grounding ...


2

You might be able to get away with mounting an extension to the existing box, then using a box cover with conduit knockout and a cable clamp you could run your cable out the front of the box instead of through the side knockouts.


2

Splices have to be in a box, and there must be access to the box. Niall C., above, has it right. While you are at it, buy some plastic staples made for NM-B cable. The metal staple shown in your picture is asking for trouble.


2

I don't know about the legality of not using them where you are, but I'd always use junction boxes for this sort of thing if only for the safety aspect.


1

You could cut your hole (1", 1.5", whatever you think is big enough) mount a piece of conduit inside and use hardware cloth over the exterior side of the hole, then pull your cables to a box mounted on the exterior near the hole. Rats/mice won't be able to get in through hardware cloth. Your roof might already have soffit vents (between roof joists, ...


1

That is an epic goat rope of a splice job. Completely illegal. In a nutshell - any splice outside of an enclosure is a hack. You can debate the semantics of safety if that's just bonding a ground or whatever but that is crappy work regardless. ALL splices must be in an approved junction box. 2008 NEC®© 300.15 Boxes, Conduit Bodies, or Fittings — ...



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