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It sounds like you need to support the 2x6 or 2x8 from below with a load bearing wall or beam. If you will be walking around up there, then you should build it like floor not a shelf. Nailing floor joists to the ceiling trusses would probably be slightly less optimal than not nailing them together because flexibility of the joist is part of the strength, but ...


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First you need to determine the weight of the items you plan to store. If the trusses were designed under the IBC/IRC or the UBC (and maybe the BOCA and SBCCI) codes, then they should of been designed with a 10 psf live load on the bottom chord. If you keep below this loading you should be okay, but you might want to check out the code requirements for your ...


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What you are calling a floor joist, appears to be much thicker than a 2x floor joist. Maybe like a 4x8 or something. So it's probably a "bearer" resting on the piers, which would explain why they are far apart. Typically you would then rest floor joists across those beams, (or use Simpson hangers if the floor needs to be nearly flush to the beams -- ...


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My answer over here is probably better suited to your question than it was there. But that was about sistering, you're talking about scabbing (the other answers there may also be helpful). What you are talking about doing is scabbing. Sistering is adding the same dimension board for the full length of the joist. Scabbing is acceptable for individual ...


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No matter what method you use to strengthen these joists, you will have to jack them up from down below before adding your sister joists or maybe flat steel to the sides of them. The floor will have to be level before bolting anything together. This may destroy your plaster ceiling down below anyway. You may be able to use wood and XPS foam to cushion and ...


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You are correct. Framing a wall or floor the two outer studs or joists are moved in to compensate for the end of the interval. If you are going for an exact dimension divisible by 4'. This makes placing 4'x8' sheets of OSB come out nice and even with no waste. Good luck!



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