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In case you're dealing with decay .... Sistering two joists is usually done to support a heavier load than the one for which the structure was originally built. On the other hand, if an existing joist is decaying, then there is no need to sister a second joist of the same dimensions because the new joist by itself will be sufficient. Just replace the ...


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no - the LSU hangers sit over the end of a square cut joist or rafter. they wont work if you cut them on an angle.


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I had 8 of the ($90) knee braces made for about $70 total by purchasing the 1/4 inch steel plate from a metal recycler. For that price they cut the pieces, drilled the holes and welded them up.


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Assuming your deck is somewhat modern and properly designed and built, it can easily handle a live load of 13 pounds per square foot (no extra footings required, no need to worry about aligning the table legs over joists, etc). That said, I am assuming your deck is somewhat modern and properly built. You should consider paying a structural engineer to take ...


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You're going to want to remove the trim joist, and let the new joists rest on the support beam. The other end of the joists will rest on whatever new support structure you add.


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The purpose of a ledger board is to give you surface onto which you can nail/attach the rest of the deck (and flashing to keep water out of a house- usually). Your question is, do you need it for attaching two decks. I think the answer to this is a decision for personal convenience, tools, or need. I personally don't undersand the use of a ledger board here ...


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Think of it like 1) taller joists, or 2) the second level of a house (without the added load of a second floor). There's no reason why the load from the upper level can't be transferred through the lower level to the footings. As to size, the upper deck can be as large as the lower deck, and if there's no cantilever on the lower deck the upper can extend ...


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Not sure what you are asking, but the footings supporting the deck structure are in the ground under the posts that hold up the beams. Footing size, post size, beam size, joist size are all engineered to support the weight of the structure,and any distances spanned. If you look at some of the other photos on the website they show posts under the outer edge ...



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