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15

Have a look at this document for a quick reference. This type of thing will be covered by International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) IBC 2308.8.2 Framing details. Joists shall be supported laterally at the ends and at each support by solid blocking except where the ends of the joists are nailed to a header, ...


13

The reason that joists are sistered using the same height of wood is simply space; generally there's no extra room. If you've got nothing below and there's space then there's no reason you can't use a taller piece of wood. Things to keep in mind: Spanning as much distance as you can so you transfer the load as evenly across the original joist. If it's too ...


13

Don't do it. The reason that you can drill through the face of a beam in the center is because the bending stress is essentially zero there. If you drill from the top to the bottom, you're removing the portions that carry the brunt of the loading (the top and bottom of the beam). If a joist that big is sistered, there's a good bet that it's a major load ...


10

Per the wording of that code, you can't be adding anything to the floor or the ceiling as you'll be under the 7' minimum. You could consider a super-thin flooring (stain the concrete? Linoleum?) and then, as you suggest, put the sheetrock between the joists (though that sounds like a finishing nightmare). Alternatively, raise the foundation (likely cost ...


10

Another method is to get pliers and a block of wood about the height of the extended nail ( protruding out the wood). Grab the nail out the side of the pliers and insert the block of wood between the joist and the head of the pliers. then use the leverage to pull the nail out, this is also great because it will not damage your wood.


10

Good question Paul, The situation with your framing is not really normal, but not uncommon for a house that age. Any time there is separation of framing members, it is a reason for concern and should be addressed. However, I would not say it is a major or alarming problem. There could be a couple of different reasons for this separation. The joists may have ...


9

We usually use one of these standard nail pullers. Grab the nail shank and roll the plier to pull the nail out of the board. It has the best leverage out of all the recommendations here. Available from several manufacturers, end nippers such as Diamond horse shoeing nippers have longer handles for better leverage and the wide head doesn't dent the wood as ...


9

If you're covering them over, then a wack with a hammer so they go all the way into the joists should be fine. That's routine during a demolition. If you absolutely need to remove the nail, then get a large channel lock plier, grip the nail tight, and roll the pliers on their head to pull the nail. The long handle gives you lots of leverage to hold the nail ...


8

I just checked some Ontario tables. For an Attic, not accessible by stairs (i.e. not used as living space, a 2x12 every 12" can span 32 ft. But you can't put anything above it. I've found nothing in the tables that allows a 30 ft span supporting a floor. While this doesn't mean it can't be done, it means you need to consult with an engineer, and pay ...


7

Other than engineered Joists, which are also made of wood products, the only alternative are steel I-beams with a wood nailer. That is of course you want to go complete commercial with steel and concrete panel floors. You better have a very fat wallet and an engineer to sign off for the modification in Mass. Such a deviation from standard residential ...


7

A properly sized floor joist should never deflect. Is your bed a water bed?. Joists are supposed to be sized to handle a minimum of 60 to 80 pounds per square foot, which is actually a lot, since loads are distributed across the entire span. If you are seeing ridges, cracks, or movement under load, you have a problem. I have seen joists wain, crack or even ...


7

Are the tongues necessary? Can I just take my circular saw right between the boards, cut them way, and then screw them back down afterward? You've been misinformed. The point of tongue-in-groove planking is to keep the floor boards from twisting, slipping and sliding against each other and squeaking (or squeaking more in your case). You still need ...


6

Since you can get to the floor from underneath, you can shore up the flooring by adding new joists between the existing ones. This will not be a FUN process, but the process is simple enough, just labor intensive. First, add cross braces between each joist at each end, of the same dimensions as your existing joists. You'll want them to be snug fitting ...


6

Disclaimer: We bring in outside contractors for our electrical installs, so I can give you some general tips, but I'll defer to others that may know more about this specific problem. In general, joists, and any lumber supporting a load on its side, will lose much of its carrying capacity when it is drilled or cut on the top or bottom. For passing through ...


6

First off let me quote the American Wood Council PRESCRIPTIVE RESIDENTIAL WOOD DECK CONSTRUCTION GUIDE (which I recommend looking through). MANUFACTURED WOOD I-JOIST: Many new homes constructed with wood I-joists include 1" or thicker engineered wood products (EWP) – such as oriented strand board (OSB) or structural composite lumber (SCL) including ...


6

OK normally load bearing walls will have 2 plates on top. But having 2 plates means nothing. People frame however they learned to or want. Checking door header also means nothing. Some people flip all door headers - doesn't make the wall load bearing. You can never get into the head of the guy who framed your house. I worked for a construction ...


6

Weight isn't going to be your issue here. 2 inch furring strips may be pretty hard to hit with the drywall screws. The screws need to be in good solid wood and not going through an edge etc. If You are careful, caulk some good lines, the 1X2's might work for ya. The other consideration is if the spacing is good and you have enough surface to butt pieces of ...


5

There is a simple answer to this. Cut the angle matching the roof on the ceiling joist, slide it in on top of your wall and attach it to the side of the rafter. Then attach them together with small lags or carriage bolts. If you look at your picture the 8" joist will be in contact with the rafter well beyond your walls. The rafters will help carry the ...


5

After reading the question and all the comments, I have to add a few things. If in fact what you have are trusses not joists, then you need to know if they are load rated for a floor. Even if the space is only for storage, a rating of 60 to 80 pounds per sq ft is required. Storage can often become a heavier load that a person just walking on the floor. ...


5

I agree with everything Shirlock said regarding adding joist hangers, but first I would advise you to stabilize your joists from whatever is causing separation. Edit The gaps you are seeing are not caused by shrinkage. The gaps were either there when constructed or have developed over time. On a positive note, the joists you've shown don't appear to be ...


4

I guess I'm curious why you wouldn't simplify the layout like this: Yellow = deck joists Green = support beams Your decking would run diagonally over the joists. If you use 2x boards for decking, that should be fine if the joists are 16" on center. If you want to use 5/4 decking, you should probably put the joists 12" on center so that the diagonal ...


4

The standard flooring material is OSB, not MDF. MDF doesn't have enough strength to support a floor load. I can't remember if it's 3/4" or 5/8" OSB, so someone will hopefully chime in with that spec. Typical spacing for joists is 19.2" (just under 3/8ths, there's usually a black diamond on tape measures for this point). It corresponds to 5 joists per 8' ...


4

It is always best to consult the manufacturer's manuals and catalogs on this. Simpson Strong-Tie is one brand that is very extensively documented. If you're talking about the diamond plate type, they belong on the outside of the building, and tie the double top plate strongly to the rafter. If you use them on the inside, they only catch the lower truss joist ...


4

No. Since the band (rim) joist is continuously supported by the foundation wall, the boring and notching rules do not apply. You will, however, want to use common sense. Try not to notch or bore directly under a window or door, especially right where the king/jack studs are. You also don't want to notch or bore the entire width of the joist, in other words ...


4

Since this is a rental unit I would have concerns with drilling holes large enough to hang a heavy bag. It could cost you the security deposit when you leave. If you check the website of the bag maker they may offer a free standing frame or you could fabricate an "A" frame out of wood. The advantage of the freestanding unit is it will isolate the house from ...


4

There is no real reason to put a spacer between the joists when sistering them. Usually using some 1/2 plywood between dimensional lumber is to correct the thickness to vertical lumber dimensions, like on a header over a door. If you were to add a spacer, I would use plywood as OSB has much less sheer strength. Adding some plywood will add a bit more ...


4

OK first let me say that if you're going to be making major structural changes to a building (and this counts as a pretty serious structural change in my mind) it would be well worth your while to get an engineer or other qualified building professional to help you with your design. If you just "wing it" you may be endangering the house and its occupants. ...


4

As a home inspector, I can tell you that sheer existence of those damaged joists are going to be a RED FLAG at any time you decide to sell and move on. If they are badly burned, they are not structurally sound and should be removed. Install a few temp supports on ends of adjacent joists, then remove and replace them one or two at a time. Use proper joist ...


3

A pair of vice grips might also work well. Clamp onto the nail near the wood, then rock back and forth to pull the nail out. Or clamp highter and then use a claw hammer under the vice grips to lift the nail.


3

Joist hangers would be fine. You can bury concrete post piers to act as your actual piers as well. Do try to leave at least a few inches of clearance though th facilitate air flow so it doesn't get too soggy underneath. But when building a deck that low, I'd suggest you also consider a patio, instead. A stone, concrete or tile patio will outlive any wooden ...



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