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11

The simplest solution is to drill the dowel hole after you fit the joint together. Fit the joint and make sure everything's square and true, then drill straight through the mortice and tenon in one go and insert the dowel. Chisel/plane and sand it flush and you should be good to go. Making a mark on the outside of the mortice where you want to drill will ...


11

Nylon mesh tape has some pros and good applications. It is best used on joints that may have more tendency to crack, seams with wider gaps, boards that don't fit real flush to each other. It is much stronger than paper tape, but more difficult to cover using straight tools.(as opposed to beveled or bow trowels) It saves time as you do not need a base mud ...


10

You may want to google "concrete leveling" in your area. There are companies that will come out and pump concrete under the floor to raise the level back to where it was. This will likely be a better solution, and may prevent further settling in the future. For your "bonus" question: A cheap bottle jack with a 4x4 should be sufficient to lift the studs ...


10

This should be a good starter project, here are a few tips I've picked up over the years: Even pressure treated wood will deteriorate over time if it's exposed or in direct contact with the ground/moisture. Do what you can to protect it from the elements and get it raised off of the soil. Use a moisture barrier between wood and concrete. Take care to ...


9

It could possibly be done using Mortise and Tenon joints, however, it looks like this table simply uses Hanger Bolts. If you look at a picture from the bottom of the table, you'll notice there are holes bored in the underside of the table top. This is likely where the nut would be attached to the bolt, which is in turn screwed into the leg.


9

As the others have said, paint will not help your situation. You will need to apply another coat of mud. The final coat can be applied using a 12 inch flat knife, but I personally like a 14 or 16 inch bow trowel. The idea is to have a thicker coat of mud over the tape and bevel or feather the edges out wide so you will not notice the small difference in ...


8

I had something similar in my basement - a drain in the middle of the floor, and the floor around it sloped toward the drain. We did pretty much what you described and it turned out really well Clean the floor up nice. Used a wire brush to roughen up the surface a bit so the new concrete will adhere well. Poured in regular concrete to almost level it out. ...


8

I know this isn't the answer you want to hear, but I don't think priming and painting will hide the tape. Before you apply any more primer, I'd add another thicker coat of mud. Slather on the mud thick first - it doesn't have to be smooth. Then smooth it out by angling your 12" knife so it's almost parallel with the drywall as you drag it along the ...


8

The way we do it is to strap the joists perpendicular with 1X3 cheap strapping. Find the lowest point in the existing field of joists and that will be your level reference. We use a laser 360 degree level , but you can get by with a good 6 foot standard bubble level. Mark off the joists in 16" on center with an extra piece of strapping along each wall edge. ...


8

Route the pieces, cut the miter, then assemble. I believe that will give the best look. You could just practice all three on some scrap to see which you like.


6

You have probably damaged the seal between your toilet and the flange. This seal is usually formed by a wax ring that forms closely to the flange and toilet base when the toilet is installed. If you've moved the toilet significantly, you may have opened up a hole in this seal where water can leak when your toilet is draining. It's sometimes possible to ...


6

You'll be fine, though you might want to go buy a bag of setting type (dry powder, mix with water - sets, rather than drying out like the stuff in a bucket) joint compound, both because it's the right type for use with mesh tape, and becasue of this tid-bit from USG: Open spaces between panels of 6.4 mm (1/4􏰀) or more should be filled with compound at ...


5

ChrisF's solution will provide you with nice, stable drilling support and it will make sure the holes line up perfectly on both parts. But if you don't want to use glue, keep in mind that it's not necessarily a bad thing if the holes don't line up perfectly; in fact, there is a specific technique called "drawboring" that requires this and makes an ...


4

Fewer points of failure Bending results in fewer high risk failure points. A continuously bent pipe has 2 high risk failure points. Whereas a similar length of pipe made with a bunch of fittings, has 2 high risk failure points per fitting. Quieter Bending a radius will provide less resistance within the pipe, so water will flow smoother. In a ...


4

How do I connect [1x4 wood] together at 90 degrees while maintaining a solid connection? If you can obtain a hand-saw (e.g. tenon-saw/back-saw), some sandpaper and some wood glue, you can make lap-joints. I find they are the easiest way for me to make rigid joints in wood. To join wood the other way, for a strong joint I'd try a simple finger joint ...


4

The joints in the design you referenced are actually plain lap joints held together by lag bolts or lag screws. If you wanted to get a bit fancier, you could always use half-lap joints or one of the other variations shown below. These will require a bit more work, but all but the dovetail lap shown below can still be done with just a circular saw and a ...


3

The point of the dowelled/drawbored mortise-tenon joint is not to line up the to parts, but to create a tension that draws the tenon tightly into the mortise. Therefore, rather than drilling though the mortise and tenon together, the drilling process is divided into three steps: Drill trough the mortise alone. Insert the tenon, and use the drill to mark ...


3

There's many variables, many choices. You could just slam some screws into the shelf edges and it may be adequate. Pocket screws are a big improvement because you are no longer screwing into the panel edges. They work really well in cabinet face frames because there is plenty of room for screw embedment. For a bookcase, embedment is limited, so you should ...


3

Just saw an article on FineHomebuilding about leveling an old ceiling. It sounds similar to what you ended up doing, except they used steel studs. They also give a good description of the installation process using a couple of guide strings to make sure everything ends up level.


3

Took me a couple of minutes to figure out what you were asking, but think I know what your asking. You need a molding to fit against the ridge beam at the top of a cathedral ceiling? Well my friend, you are not going to find one that is not 90 degrees at a box store. I'm afraid the only good solution is to find a friend with a decent table saw and cut a ...


3

A usual method is to go down the edge of the wall with a surface bullnose, showing a "knife edge" at the corner. This means the tile rolls down to meet the corner. Another method, if your bullnose has finished bottoms, is to overlap the edge and go "around the corner", having the bullnose round into the outside wall (the wall that has the striped ...


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


3

Use waterproof glue, make the joint tight-fitting, and leave the screws on the shelf. A lap joint is one of the strongest of all the glued wood joints, and a well-fitted glued lap joint will be at least as strong without the screws as with them. But... there's a condition. How wide are the two planks forming that joint? And which wood is being used? I ask ...


3

I would just drill pilot holes and screw it together, you don't need to do fancy cuts in the wood. If you need extra stability, put in a diagonal (diagonal cuts all the way across a board are much easier than notching). I would put in a small diagonal brace on each corner, although it would be easier to just use a large one across the whole frame. I built a ...


2

Are you absolutely committed to the idea of using dowels for this? If so, in addition to a doweling jig you might want to pick up a set of transfer plugs to mark the hole locations on your upright. (You might not need these if the doweling jig can be used on a board face -- hard to tell from the photo on the Lee Valley site.) If you have no special ...


2

Maybe a 2 phase approach would work. Buying a drill press attachment for your hand drill ... much like this one and then building a jig where you could insert a dowel and attach the drill press attachment. That way you have the freedom of the hand drill and the jig will give you precision and ease of use for 160 drillings. A bit more complex than the drill ...


2

If you're refering to the sort of caulk-like stuff that runs along the edge of the glass, it's called 'window glazing putty', sometimes 'window glazing compound'. You can find sites online that cover how to re-glaze a window; you may want to remove the glazing from the rest of the window so you can get a clean edge all the way around, and a matching color: ...


2

Biscuits for all joints will work fine. Across side panels to top. Along the two rails at the top and at sides. Be sure to have a helper, and perhaps some extra temporary stretchers that match the rails (for the bottom). That way you can clamp and square the sides first and put the top on last.



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