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I always plan my bathroom around the first row of tiles above the tub. Everything else plays off of that. These are the tiles that will be most noticeable and most susceptible to issues. I will always put whole piece vertically speaking in this first row. From there I work my way up, out, and out and down. If I notice that I am going to have a sliver at ...


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I have tiled my own floors, ran base, wood and tile in one room or another. I have also flushed toilets and had them overflow. The construction of wood framed homes inherently allows for water which naturally seeks the lowest point will find the gaps at the plate line to the underlayment, (and tile!!) all around the perimeter of any bath. To me that has a ...


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You can find a lot of valuable information on tiling information at The Floor Elf He has a summary on grout vs. caulk. The term he uses is "changes in plain" and makes good arguments for using caulk. Since you will be putting down baseboard it wont really be seen so finding a perfect match in color is not an issue. Here is a summary from the article at: ...


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If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


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If it isn't too difficult, dry lay the length and width of the room with spacers to understand your best focal point. Usually the first full tile starts at the threshold, which customarily for a bathroom is marble. Ideally, as you are planning on using the same tile vertically as well as on the floor, you can compromise on the spacing and use a ⅜" grout ...


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It's all aesthetics. Common strategy is to lay it out so that cut tiles and uneven lines are situated in less notable places that do not naturally catch the eye. An example would be to use cut tiles on both sides of a wall or floor to avoid a line of narrow-cut tiles, which looks bad.


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Clarity in description would help. With a floor that is not enclosed by parallel walls, the usual approach is to center the tiles (start from a chalk line in the center of the floor) so that there's a cut-tile on either side of the floor, and cut to fit the walls as they are. How that works out in reality is dependent on the size of both the tiles and the ...


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I think what you're saying is that the walls and the tub are not perpendicular and that you are going to tile the wall. You want to know whether you should match a wall or the tub. In situations like this my recommendation is usually to tile in a diamond pattern or to use smaller or subway or mosaic tiles such that long, contiguous grout lines are not ...


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If you use a spacer the inset must be equal to or less than 1/4 of an inch to be NEC compliant. See this question for relevant information: How do I extend outlets after installing a backsplash? Personally, I would just get a box extender like the one in the answer to the question above. They are fairly cheap and better by design (in my opinion).


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I have used a plastic spacer from a Mechano set on the screws that holds the receptacle in the work box. That one was about 1/4 inch by 1/4 round. They look like this although the one in the picture is not the same size.


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I have recently had your dilemma. It wasn't pretty. My solution was to cut two one inch discs from the end of the tree trunk. In my case these were discarded in the garage. I used these discs as shims/wedges between the screws of the stand. It made the tree more secure and so far the tree has held firm. By the way I only placed the discs/wedges on either ...



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