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Just a thought, I worked in an office with an internal bathroom, i.e. no exterior walls and we noticed a off smell there as well. The toilets and sinks worked fine, it wasn't until we realized the floor drain was the source. There was a P trap on the floor drain and the water had evaporated in the trap, allowing air to escape into the room. You might want ...


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To me it sounds like the vent from the bathroom to the outside must have moisture in it and growing something. I say this because many HVAC systems have a small percentage of fresh air added when they are running and this keeps the air moving out of the bathroom. When the System is off the smell wafts back into the room. You may be able to use a spray ...


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What I ended up doing was similar to what people suggested by putting up a temporary barrier. I waited for drywall on one side (I was lucky to be able to do that because I had an unconditioned space), then I put the cotton insulation in and held it in with R11 kraft faced. Considering it's for sound control the double insulation was not a bad thing (so ...


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Probably too late for you, but when I had a similar issue I wrapped the back in this sheet material before insulating. It was easy to install with staples and then I sprayed foam around the edges. On the inside where some bays were too wide for the insulation that I had at hand, I just put a piece of duct tape across the bay at the top, middle and bottom, to ...


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You can't (practically speaking) make your slabs thinner. It would be a monumental undertaking considering the nature of hollow-core doors and symmetrical mortising. You can either move the stops or get new slabs and start over. To move the stops, slice the paint with a utility knife, then work a steel putty knife behind the stop to loosen it. Gently pry ...


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From the comments it sounds like you have drywall on one side. I'd set up a measuring jig to give consistent, square cuts, and cut your batts to length so that they fit well horizontally. Stack them in the stud spaces. If necessary, apply a sheeting over it to give additional support. Something with a textured surface might be preferable to polyethylene ...


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Searching Google for 24" denim batts turned up a ton of options that are available. Here is an example. Using this will be WAY easier than trying to hack 16" stuff together. If you are pretty intent on going with 16", you could try placing the insulation in the cavity and then stapling 24" wide paper like this over it to hold it in place. If I were doing ...



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