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15

Get a heavy stand Growing up, my dad had a traditional stand that looks something like this: That works for smaller trees as long as you can be sure that nobody (such as a child or pet) will disturb it. That's not at all a given. Remember that trees have extensive root systems that keep them grounded during windy periods and so it's important to get a ...


13

You're spreading the mud out over a progressively larger area so that instead of a small but sharp bump (or dip) in the middle of the joint, you have a much more gradual bump (or dip). That way, any irregularities in the surface are much less noticeable and can be easily masked by texturing.


12

I don't have any experience with boxes, but have quite a bit with the 5-gallon buckets of compound. Without knowing much about how those boxes seal, I'd recommend going with a bucket- the buckets/lids seal air tight which is important for keeping the mud from drying out. The other thing I'd recommend- every time you close the box or bucket, put a piece of ...


12

Are you sure the walls and headers are wood? It is possible if the construction is new, it is built with steel studs. Check with your landlord. If they are steel, you can pilot a hole with a titanium bit or use self drilling screws made for steel framing. It would be very unlikely to find wiring and nail guards that close to the edge of a window or door ...


10

A stud finder is completely non-intrusive and will give you a good idea of how the wall is built. Run it horizontally back and forth at several different heights to map where the studs are, then run it vertically within your newly-found stud cavities to see if there's any lumber going between the studs. You can guess at where the wiring might be by looking ...


10

I have always been pleased with Behr paints from the Home Depot, though I know they are a bit pricey. From my experience less expensive paints tend to have the following in common (and I'm sure this is by no means comprehensive) less covering ability ... the pigments used don't seem to be able to provide as good a barrier to bleed through from what's on ...


9

Note that that progression only applies for "butt" joints where the unshaped short edges of drywall panels meet, not to long-edge joints where the edge is thinner to create a recess in the finished wall. On those edge joints, you just want to fill up the recess not bulge and feather it, so your knife only needs to be long enough to span the recess, or about ...


9

I found it took me a couple hundred hours of applying mud to get to the point where I knew exactly how I wanted it to look. I learned just fine by starting with the pre-mixed straight out of the bucket and slapping it on the wall. You'll quickly notice the difference in application ("spreadability") when it starts to dry in your mud pan a little bit. Then ...


9

Turn off the power at the panel for this circuit (flip the circuit breaker). Remove the cover plate from the switch. Test with a non-contact tester to make sure that there is no power in the circuit box. Unscrew the switch. Remove the two wires from the switch (unscrew or, if they are press in types, cut them close to the switch) Straighten the wires ...


8

I'm surprised that the switch controls the entire outlet -- generally in that setup (in North America at least), the switch only controls one plug, and the other plug is constant power. In that case of course, the answer is to use a power bar. It may even be worth checking in the plug to see if there is constant power available. You may be able to fix the ...


8

This happens because water is diverted away from the shower to the toilet or washing machine. What happens next will depend on the type of shower and it's age. Older, non thermostatic showers will be affected to a greater extent. For an electric shower the flow of water through the shower will be reduced which will have the effect of heating it up further ...


7

In addition to the things @Steve Jackson mentioned in his comment, the quick-drying mud (called setting compound) is also much harder to sand than the slower drying-type compound, which makes it not such a great choice for your final coats where you're going to be doing the most sanding. Pros use it because they're able to apply it so well that it requires ...


7

I stay away from chemical solutions all together. I have had reasonably good luck with using a drain snare to snag most of the hair in my tub drain. Every few months, I will shoot one down the drain if I see it getting a little slow. This will normally clear things up without any further intervention. When that fails, I usually move towards using a hand ...


7

Basically you need to look at two things: What you are hanging (how heavy, will it sway, is it a vertical load or does it have a horizontal component) What are you hanging it on (wallboard, plaster, old crappy plaster, stud wall, concrete wall, brick, stone, solid wood...) Then you pick the right fastener at the intersection of these two. Assuming you ...


7

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


6

Check the water line connections. I would open the bottom access panel, and watch for any leaks while you run it the first time. Often the parts used are not of the greatest quality, including the solenoid valve that controls the water. On that note, make sure there is a manual shut-off valve, so you can turn it off quickly if there is a leak. Beyond ...


6

You certainly can put different types of mud on top of each other without any problems. Generally it's done the opposite way though - using the quick drying mud for the first/second coats and the pre-mix for the final coats. As for sandability, pre-mix is going to be the easiest to sand. The quick drying mud can still be sanded without much trouble ...


6

I'd use 2 1/2" No. 8 screws for this (assuming you are screwing through the 2" dimension of the new wood. It will make life easier if you drill pilot holes, but it's not essential if you are using a powered screwdriver. As for the type I've found that deck or chipboard screws seem to have the sharpest thread and so drive quite easily through wood.


6

Check the rubber seal around the door. It may well have deteriorated to the point where it's unable to provide a proper seal and needs replaced. If that seal dry/cracked this is probably the case. Or if you run the dishwasher, watch for water leaking from where the bottom of the door meets the main unit.


6

My approach has been: Drop baseboards. Knock out a small hole behind the baseboard. Stick my iPhone in. Snap a bunch of photos with the flash on. If the photos aren't working well enough/providing enough coverage, I'll record a video with the flash on. This has been tremendously useful in working out where cables are and where they've been stapled to the ...


6

A router (along with a special guide) can be used to cut part of the inset you need, but is not the easiest tool to use if you are not experienced, and it does not cut square corners, which still require a chisel to finish. Using a chisel does take care and practice, but it is not beyond the reach of even an amateur if you are willing to do a test piece ...


6

I'm going to presume you have a fairly standard type of christmas tree stand, like this one, however much of what I am saying applies to other sorts of standsthat rely on similar mechanics. Notice, at the bottom of the stand the little red trianglar tabs that stick up vertically? They are important in preventing your tree from tipping. Before tightening ...


5

Personally, I would just build a rectangle out of 2x4s slightly smaller than the hole, lower it into the hole flush with the existing framing, then screw it to the existing framing. That will give you a nice surface to attach your new drywall to. Depending on the size of the hole, you might want a cross member in the box as well so your drywall isn't ...


5

Option 1: Try some nail polish of an appropriate colour. It's not a perfect fix by any means, but it is cheap, and you are replacing soon. Option 2: Cut out the entire 'tile' on the 'grout' lines and cut a matching piece from leftovers if you have any. Glue it down with contact cement. The edge of the patch will collect dirt and become ugly pretty fast. ...


5

I know the question is already solved but I learned a lot over the weekend watching drywall videos on YouTube. There are a number with Laurier Desormeaux posted by drywallgall that were really good.


5

If you have an attic or a basement get over/under the wall and look. The sill plate and the cap may hide some things, but there will inevitably be something poking through nearby. You've already thought of plumbing, are there any outlets or vents on that wall? What about cold air return grates?



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