Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I had done this manually in my walls . I stapled down a roll out tarp paper to each stud and the bottom stud. Did this half way fluffed it in a huge crawfish pot(I'm from Louisiana), and used a dust pan to scoop Nd fill between each stud. Went back on the top tucked it into the lower trap stapled down and did the same as filling. I also note I'm doing this ...


0

I know the source in UK - www.kensington-green.co.uk - if anyone interested. pir/pur insulated panels for roofs and walls finnished in metal. any colour They ship worldwide.


1

"When fiberglass batts are installed in the ceiling of a crawlspace, gravity always wins in the end" source Faced or unfaced, it is almost always a bad idea to insulate the floor above a crawlspace, especially with fiberglass batts. Insulate the crawlspace walls and seal the vents instead. The one exception is if you are in a flood zone. A sealed ...


1

The problem often overlooked is that the paper vapor barrier on the insulation should be oriented to face towards the room. Also, the paper must be in complete contact with the floor bottom to function correctly. So now the only way to secure the insulation in each joist bay is with metal push rods. Try to fill each joist bay fully and completely.


0

Cap the floor joists with rigid insulation. I'd first make sure the existing insulation is completely filling each joist bay and as expanded as possible (no edge curls, gaps nor compressed sections). Remember, the paper vapor barrier should be facing the living space you are heating or cooling. For a truly draft-free seal there is now a spray foam kit sold ...


1

Since it will be a conditioned space you will want to use as much insulation as possible to increase the R- value. If you intend to cover each bay (space between rafters) with drywall it would be wise to leave at least a 1 inch space between the bottom of the roof planks and the insulation to allow water vapor from the inside a way to dissipate to the ...


3

This is not a DIY job. Mold can spread everywhere in a wood-framed house full of drywall. Call in the pros to estimate the source and extent of the infection. Simply killing the mold won't help if you don't find the moisture source that made it moldy in the first place. PSA to the world: stop building houses out of wood and drywall. Sheesh, what awful ...


1

This is an interesting problem. I'm wondering if you can bury your water supply line so that it would be unaffected by the frozen ground temperature? (Think below perma-frost and ground heave). Also, if the water is being piped a short distance from building that is already being heated maybe an auto draining valve (as @Ecnerwal mentioned) could be installed ...


1

You need a "frost-proof hydrant" (which will have a garden hose thread, not a fire hose thread.) That is a valve that is buried below frost line. On the hose side of the valve, there is a small, deliberate leak (this should not leak when the valve is open.) When the valve is closed, the leak drains water from the standing part of the pipe. Without heat, ...


1

In theory, that's fine. However, 1/2" is nowhere near enough insulation, and may actually create more problems than it solves, especially if you live in a cold area and your wall studs are deeper than 2x4. Thin foam like what you're proposing can cause wintertime condensation on the inside of whatever's right behind it. I would recommend at least a full ...


1

I think you've hit on the easiest solution. Putting in a layer of insulation board and then boarding over the top of that is the approach I'd take. If you don't want to use the door then you can just put insulation right to the frame and board over that to hide the door completely. However, if you want to be able to use the door then you'd have to leave ...


0

the space does not have to be filled but should not be between the two foam layers. The required R value Does have to be met. To find your total R value: add the specified ratings for both foams. Why are you putting the vapor barrier on the inside? Is this code compliant where you are?


2

It's becoming code in a lot of places to vent your crawl space. Pretty much everywhere if you live in a flood plain in order to get insurance. Whether flood plain or not, many areas are requiring them for everything new. Vented helps to prevent both mold and buildup of gasses like radon in your house. You can get vents which open and close according to the ...


0

The answer to this question depends upon the climate condition in which it is located. Moderate climate: insulate between floor joists and vent crawl space to promote air circulation and mitigate mold growth. Colder dryer climates: Insulate foundation and seal ground to prevent moisture coming up from ground. Thus keeping any pipes in crawl space from ...


0

As an answer to a question: how to fill that gap between sill plate and foundation wall?, I would advise to use self-levelling concrete (or whatever You call it). It's most often used to level the floor before putting anything else (if the floor base is concrete and not level or the surface is not 'mild' enough to place a carpet or something. To make it ...


0

There are many excellent insulation products on the market that keep heat, and noise, inside your studio! Don’t forget when insulating the walls and floor of your loft studio to remember windows and the loft hatch too, if you have one. I have read one blog on it, if you want some idea regarding to it you can check these blog, i think it will help you. ...


1

As with any answer, you should check your local codes. However, Going with R-30 on top and R-13 on the sides is standard and will give you very good value. If you can, you should plan on putting R-30 into the 'diagonals' too, that is, where the rafters are above the knee-walls but below the ceilings. If you don't have enough room now, you can screw some 2x4s ...


0

I've been reading a lot on this because I'm trying to figure out what I'll do on my addition. The best way might be to insulate with foam the whole exterior down past the sill plate. You'd probably want aluminum flashing underneath the bottom of the foam near the ground to keep insects from crawling up to it. I'm assuming you have a foot + on the outside ...


0

I think you should refer (http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/how-do-i-deal-with-neighbors-excessive-noise-complaints-good-questions-184054). It will help to find out the solution on it.


0

Just looking at info in the net, you would need 240 square inches of vent to 1000 square feet of roof.



Top 50 recent answers are included