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Solution offered by iLikeDirt is good but not complete; actually it doesn't solve the biggest problem. Fact is that your home has insulation problem that's why ground floor is so cold. You can and should put insulation around perimeter, but you should also out some insolation on the floor. Best solution would be to put it under a concrete slab, but since ...


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Sounds like your concrete slab is un-insulated around the perimeter and/or the bottom. The very conductive flooring material (tile) doesn't help; the combination of these two means that the floor has very little thermal resistance to heat flow, so you constantly lose heat through the slab. If the heat you generate is quickly rising through the second floor, ...


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To make long story short from what I see my best guess is that you have condensation issue. Most likely since your pump is in the corner there is somewhere thermal insulation missing and since you said that there is draft that means cold air is coming inside. Where from?.... I cannot be 100% sure. My money would be on the wall because most likely places ...


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Skip the studs - there's nothing structural here. Use (roughly) 9-10 cm of rigid foam insulation and 1-2 cm of plasterboard/drywall or plaster, depending on internal finish of the rest of the room. Glue the foam in place with a construction adhesive meant to work with the type of foam you get (should come in a caulking tube.) Use some canned polyurethane ...


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Thanks for the pictures,now things are clear.When it comes to wall-floor joint you can use acrylic based silicone (it is white and in tubes) looks almost identical as wall paint,and it's elastic so it wouldn't crack again.Window-wall joints are a bit more difficult.From what I can see this is a dry wall?IF that is the case im guessing that who ever did this ...


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Use a combined moisture & sound deadening barrier like Roberts Unison 2-in-1. I put this under my engineered bamboo floor. It was an easy install and works great.


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You can caulk the window to the drywall or moulding. I like siliconized latex caulk, but pure silicone can work well too (lasts longer, but not paintable, and collects dust more if it's on a horizontal joint). For the baseboards, there are a couple of things you can do. If removing them is an option, you can stick foam backer rod between the customary gap ...


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In the bath with the tile base, there is caulk available that is colored to closely resemble a number of colored grouts. Any of the big box stores will carry a good selection of colors. The wood base will need only a good version of white painters caulk, wiped in with a dampened cloth to make the line only in the joint. I forgot to add this detail about the ...


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Skip the 2x3 studs. If you are going to build "nearly SIPs" you'll get a better (lighter, stronger, better insulated) product if you just build (or buy) SIPs and build with SIP methods. Modern construction adhesives make this far more practical as a DIY project than it used to be, though getting them factory built should not be overly difficult or expensive. ...


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Perhaps I'll simplify this and use 11/32 sheathing so I can apply housewrap around that, and then whatever siding I wish (perhaps T&G cedar). It'll probably add 500-600 lbs to the walls, but it sounds like it'll simplify it a bit and be worth it.


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Didn't you ask the same question somewhere else recently? This sounds really familiar. You should stick to proven wall designs. 2x3s are going to be more difficult to work with. No sheathing will mean virtually no racking resistance against wind. You almost never want a dedicated vapor barrier, especially if you're planning to use rigid foam anywhere (that ...


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Thermal mass does not block heat; it stores and releases heat, and it slows down the flow of heat. It will absorb heat when it is colder than the surrounding area, and it will release heat when it is warmer than the surrounding area. These characteristics are useful in the following circumstances: A thermal mass wall in a climate/season where the outdoor ...


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I read all of the above answers and none of them seems to be a permanent solution for your problem. This is a major issue with north facing poor insulated developments. If I were you I would have built a stud wall on both external walls allowing cavity between the original wall and newly built stud wall . Ones you built the stud wall insulate both internal ...


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For the back door, you can move the strike in towards the door stop the 3mm you need to get it to contact the weather stripping. Be careful how you do this, it will require a bit of cutting out of the jamb to move it back and reset longer screws to hold it there. Move it no more than you need, too much will make the door difficult to latch when you close it. ...


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Something moved or warped. The door, the door jambs, the wall... Easiest thing to do is add additional weather stripping. They make weather stripping that comes on either wood or aluminum strips for attaching to the door jambs. Comes with either the D style weatherstrip or the kerf style which you purchased. It's basically what you bought with a rigid piece ...


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You fill the joist bays with fiberglass or mineral wool batts, then you cover the underside of the joists and batts with a few inches of rigid foam or rigid mineral wool boards, and then you protect that layer by covering it up with plywood or OSB. One layer has to be your air barrier. If you use rigid foam, make that your air barrier and caulk and tape the ...


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When I started working chief engineer on one site told me something that describes this situation the best: "When you are cold do you eat your coat or do you wear it?” To put it differently every type of insulation, thermal included should be placed on the outer side of the building. From how you described I realized that you are planning to do it from the ...


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Hard to say from this pictures, but my best guess is that this is thermal insulation (mineral wool, and the foil which is around it is protecting it from moisture, because this type of thermal insulation really doesn’t like water/humidity. When it comes to how thick it should be that depends on several things like where do you live (local climate) what type ...


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Vapor barrier (if any) goes on the warm side of the wall. That's the inside for those of us in the frozen North (on average, for the greater part of the year.) In central Texas I'm guessing that might be the outside, on average. Best solution to messy irregular stud bays might be damp-spray (aka glue-spray) cellulose (not a DIY product, but really good at ...


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The paper facing on insulation acts as a vapor barrier that should be only on the interior side of the wall, not the exterior. DO NOT put a vapor barrier on each side as it will cause condensation. Since you are working from the outside, you could install Tyvek or visqueen to the studs, wrapping them, so to speak, then a non-faced insulation held by ...


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The standard solution for an insulated hatch cover has it resting on trim flush with the ceiling. You should pound or pack out the framing for the hatch so that it is tightest at the bottom (where it meets your ceiling). Add weatherstripping to the top of the trim on which the cover sits to prevent airflow when it is in place, and the insulation on top of ...


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Yes. If you're using bats with a vapor barrier put the vapor barrier side against the wood floor. Even if the basement is conditioned another benefit of insulation is to reduce noise transmission from any appliances (like air handlers) that may be running down there.


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There is a polyurethane foam rope-like insulation used to fill gaps before adding caulk This comes in various sizes from 3/8" to 5"8. It can be compressed to about 1/4 of its diameter. It also should be removable, if need be. Images and links are for illustration only and not an endorsement of products or sources.


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If you have a concern about potential damage I would use "Moretite". It is a clay like material. It comes in a roll of various diameters.It is inexpensive and somewhat reusable. You can wrap several pieces together for larger gaps. I have never had issues with paint damage or residue after removal


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You could use "seal and peel" type removable weatherstripping caulk. Some type of caulk would probably be the permanent solution as well.


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There are no red flags that I see in your question. I don't like drylocking walls that will be covered in basements for the simple fact that if water hits concrete I would rather it go through the concrete than sit in the concrete (where if it freezes then expands will help promote larger cracks). But you have 15 years there and nothing so good for you and ...



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