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1

I would insulate it. Insulation is a thermal barrier; it impedes the transfer of thermal energy from one side of the insulation to the other. This means if it is warmer inside the garage than outside the house, insulation will keep it warmer longer because heat will escape more slowly due to the insulation. If it is cooler inside the garage than it is ...


4

I would insulate it unless the cost is exorbitant. As you have discovered, it is basically impossible to heat an uninsulated structure with just a little space heater. Also if you are going to be keeping cars in the garage as well, having an insulated garage will keep it warmer even if you don't heat it. My garage is insulated but unheated and it is ...


0

Insulation will help a bit to keep it warmer. A lot warmer if your garage door is insulated too. On the flip side, it will be a warmer in the summer as the insulation will keep heat in then too. The garage to house should be insulated plus the garage to attic... which means you are talking about insulating 2 walls at most (one could be attached to house ...


3

Based on your picture and your description, you have what is known as a cathedral ceiling. The "1-2 feet of space" you mention leads me to believe that it's built with parallel chord trusses rather than solid rafters. Can you post a picture? Regardless, like most cathedral ceilings, yours seems to be insulated insufficiently and built incorrectly (ridge ...


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From your diagram and description, it seems the ridge vent allows cold or hot air to flow below the insulation. In that case, the insulation will have little effect. Also, since there are no vents on the ends of the attic, the ridge vent will be somewhat ineffective, since there is no easy path for the air to flow. You might put in vents at the ends of the ...


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The key question is whether you'll see a benefit from doing so. In the winter, you may see better insulation from full cavities. In the summer, you're going to have a very hot attic due to poor airflow. The cost to cool the home in summer may outweigh the savings in winter. Moisture accumulation may also be a concern, though condensation is less when ...


1

It's called HDPS (high density polystyrene) Most commonly used in decking. Some is a direct replacement for wood, and yes it is expensive. But your deck will last much longer without maintainance. It comes in different densities and the lighter the greater the r value, but the lower the strength. Unfortunatly there are pretenders in the market place. HDPS ...


0

It depends--if it gets hot enough inside during summer, you'll want all the ventilation you can get (I assume you have no AC and mostly don't need it). In a 2-story house, I'd imagine that on sunny summer days (however rare those might be in Portland) the upstairs would get hot enough that you'd want all windows open. In San Francisco, in a lower-floor ...


0

All right. As soon as you see a headline beginning with "Losing Their Health and Homes to..." you should know that last thing the author has in mind is making your life better. The article is nothing more than atrocious clickbait. Do not make fundamental changes in your life or your home based on what somebody wrote purely to sell internet advertising. Now, ...


0

If your window structure allows, you might also consider making an "interior window insulating panel". Essentially an interior "storm" window that can be installed and removed as needed. This site has all the details: http://www.arttec.net/Thermal-Windows/ I went this route for one window in my house where the plastic just didn't want to stick to the ...


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I know this is old but when renovating the first thing you should do is move this over to PVC. Second bolt some pvc collars to the side walls so you don't have the metal guides hanging down. Third build a 3/4 box around it and sandwich roxul against wall and around pipe. The roxul will insulate and it will also keep much more sound out than foam.


0

Since it's difficult to vent the lower portion of a hip roof, they usually aren't. Ridge vents typically aren't intended to be used on hips (though some are now available that meet the unique weather-protection needs of sloped ridges). You can simply remove the baffles in that area and fill your space with insulation. Some might suggest leaving an air gap, ...


1

I'll give another answer from my own experience.. We did 2 layers with the first layer underneath being bubble wrap. I have an unfinished basement with two old single pane windows. They simply had a curtain over them, but were still losing a lot of heat. I saw this idea online and it seems to work great for us and provides an easy and cheap secondary layer. ...


1

There are, as always, tradeoffs. First, 1 inch is more than is generally considered ideal - 1/2" or so is preferred as it's less prone to internal convection currents. Yes, plastic window film kits are often installed with considerably larger spacing, but they are also commonly installed on less than ideal windows where they stop actual drafts... Any ...


0

If you aren't worried about touching the insulation, and just want to make sure it stays in place, nylon cord or twine stapled across each bay in a zig-zag pattern will be one of your easiest approaches. I've got this in a few places in my house. Covering the whole wall in any kind of sheeting or additional insulation can cause moisture problems. You never ...


1

Plastic isn't recommended in this situation because it would create a second vapor barrier that can trap moisture and result in condensation and mold. Craft paper would have the same problem, this is what is most likely on the other side of the insulation for the vapor barrier you want. The good solution for this is a house wrap material (often referred to ...


1

I find the best bet is the shrink wrap plastic kits, because on a sunny day the warmth from the sun is way more efficient than simply keeping cold air out (which the plastic does anyway). Unless of course the window is facing north, then the sun won't benefit you but you will still stop the draft from coming in. I installed them throughout my house and it ...


3

This is done all the time by insulation contractors. The technique is to drill a series of holes at the top of the wall. They next use a commercial 'blower' that forces insulation into the walls bay. It is a very non-invasive form of insulating because (as you asked) it doesn't necessitate the demolition of existing walls. It is also well with-in a competent ...


1

Ice forms in that location because 1) heat is lost where the two panes of glass are connected by the metal frame, and 2) cold air sinks to the bottom of the window opening. I don't see any red flags that indicate air leakage or other serious issues. The fact that the entire glass pane frosts up at times reinforces that position. You have simple heat ...


0

Try removing the window air conditioner. You're not honestly expecting to use it, and being indoors will lengthen the unit's life.


9

Tightening the transparent plastic is mainly for cosmetic reasons. As long as the tape stays in place, the plastic will do its job of preventing air flow. If the kit is exposed to buffeting winds strong enough to snap the plastic sheet back and forth, it could tear or pull off the tape. So you want it to be as tight as possible. In general most people find ...


7

The hairdryer step is for two reasons: To prevent noise in drafty situations, and to improve visibility and aesthetics. If you can live without either of those, it'll work just fine. One possible solution to your pull-away problem would be to apply the double-stick tape to the outside face of the window trim (perpendicular to the wall surface).


0

It's a bit hard to tell what I'm looking at from that one photo, but it may have been someone's attempt at a homemade version of the common commercial weather seal that you see on modern overhead doors. I'd probably remove it entirely and start fresh. 3 pieces of vinyl molding with rubber gasket will probably cost under $25.


2

It's not hype, but it's not a commercial viability for home insulation at this time. I was just looking at the prices for aerogel and it's really expensive. It seems that the current use in house insulation is as a wrap. And from the prices I saw, it was $26 per square foot for 2mm thick material. Premium fiberglass is about $0.50 per square foot (2"x6" ...


0

Most (any?) foam insulation will be better than fiberglass. But also more expensive. Regardless, there's no need to go with aerogel unless you are building something that needs to be ultra-lightweight, which houses don't usually need to be. Replacing fiberglass with standard spray foam insulation will be a giant improvement. Not sure you'd be able to justify ...



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