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2

Vented soffit below the window will allow air in, and will reduce the effectiveness of insulation. Other than that, it wouldn't cause a problem, but you're already concerned about the cold near the window. You should focus on how the water gets in, and prevent that from happening in the first place. It should be fairly easy for your contractor to tell ...


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I would have to agree, the paper usually goes toward the conditioned side, in this case I would that is the subfloor side since the basement is so humid


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Improper flushing often results from minerals clogging up the holes under the rim of the toilet. The usual cure is to clear out the buildup with a muriatic acid treatment.


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The vapor barrier may have been done correctly; it depends on several factors like temperature, whether the basement is a living area, or if is a laundry area or has other sources of moisture build up. You need to ask your local inspector.


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You could. I would consider buying XPS foam and gluing it to the walls with foam board adhesive. It will let the wall breathe while insulating and not have exposed fiberglass or bare paper. Good luck!


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Styrene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen based on limited evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in experimental animals, and supporting data on mechanisms of carcinogenesis. [...] Polystyrene is used extensively in the manufacture of plastic packaging, thermal ...


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I have similar windows at home (mine are pushing 30 years) and I've been able to replace a broken pane in one window some time back. It was not fun. As I recall, there is a rubber spacer between the panes and glass may be glued to it, and the whole assembly has the exact thickness of the channel in the window sash. If you simply remove one pane without doing ...


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I woud not try the "cut out or smash one pane" approach. I might try removing the pane as a unit (yep, you're going to have to dis-assemble wherever it was "built in place" a little) and drilling the seal/separator full of holes to ventilate it - or simply go ahead and replace it. If ventilated, the ventilation should be to the outside air in a heating ...


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Look for something called an automatic door sweep. These are devices that have a spring loaded sweep which raises when the door is opened. When the door is closed a cam is activated which drops the sweep.


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That's true. What's also true is that insulation is cheap and easy. (but copper is expensive, so if you have to double your power flow, it's cheaper to double voltage than current.) That means that for voltage so low as 12 volts DC, any wire made will have enough insulation. I would be thinking more about environment: heat, flexibility, mechanical wear, ...


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A 'door sock' will do the trick. A tight cold room can also introduce an abundance of condensation development inside the wall cavity leading to mold growth.


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The standard now is to never do that again especially if you use air conditioning. Building science has determined this was a very bad idea because it traps moisture within the wall cavity. Here's a little Building Science 101 on this issue... http://buildingscience.com/documents/insights/bsi-073-macbeth-does-vapor-barriers


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Google "bottom mount door sweep" for any number of inconspicuous options. It appears that your gap is roughly 3/4", which should be fairly easy to fill. Really, though, I'd investigate why an interior door has so much airflow around it. A window a/c unit should have no trouble keeping up in a single bedroom. You should be able to see your breath.


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Without more information or a photo, my answer is to purchase a replacement ceiling tile, cut it to fill your gaps, put the original tile you removed in storage so you will have it if you move out of the space.


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I don't know if you have done a lot of work in attics... But one little gap and you can feel the incredibly wrong air currents when there is a conditioned space next to a non-conditioned. This vortex of air flow can cause dramatic energy costs. So if you have an unconditioned outdoor space that has a drop ceiling next to a conditioned room the number one ...


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I have a similar concern about using the plastic during the summer. This past winter I decided to try the Duck Brand Tape "Cristal Clear Shrink Film" at the beginning of December. The kit was for a 10 window install with 2 rolls of the sticky tape and sold at Walmart for nine dollars & change.; How could I go wrong? So I did it. WOW!! I have to say this ...


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Spray foam is toxic regardless of manufacturer claims. Water-blown does not constitute safe. Read the manufacturer's SDS / Safety Data Sheet and compare them. Some tell the whole story, other's hide the truth behind 'proprietary' disclosure laws. Everything you need to know to protect your family from the hazards associated with this insulating product ...


2

here is how we do block wall basement finishing - in almost 30 years i have never had a callback or any complaints about leaks after the fact. you do have to make sure the foundation is in good shape with no failed blocks or footings. 1) hire a foundation waterproofing company to come in and shoot urethane foundation sealer (blueseal is what we use. like ...


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Unfaced friction-fit fiberglass in R-11 or R-13 will do just fine. If you're concerned about them sagging, staple each batt to the top plate. They won't go anywhere. Depending on your climate, do not apply a vapor retarder over the wall. Let it breathe to avoid mold and mildew.


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Honestly, I would get some sheets of plywood (is OSB stiff enough?) and rip em down to 2x8 or other appropriate size, making a compromise between spanning enough joists and fitting in your car. Float them around as needed to do your work. "Just step on the joists" has a fairly high penalty for error, at the least, refinishing a ceiling.


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It's fine to walk on solid wood without moving insulation around. If the batts are super-thick and have compressed markedly from you stepping on them, you can fluff them up a bit on exit. Otherwise, they'll fluff back naturally. Don't forget the particulate mask when you're around that stuff.


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Please be aware Bleach does not kill mold. https://www.normi.org/articles/bleach-mold.php Moreover, pictures would greatly improve our chances to help you. Things I would suggest you to look for is condensation in the ducts. This can occur when there is a leak of cold air in the duct work. This creates a heat exchange between the hot air outside in the ...


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If your in a cold weather area a layer of poly creates a vapor barrier, otherwise Drywall and plywood have no insulation value. Notes for the insulation between roof trusses: 4" cavity space: R-13 or R-15 batts, 6" cavity space: R-19 or R-21 batts, if it's a wide open attic, use an R-30 or R-38 batt.


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Rip the ceiling, insulate, and put the new ceiling drywall on resilient channel. Or use an acoustic tile suspended ceiling as already suggested - if you have room to drop it 6" or so, you can insulate above the tiles without ripping the drywall off the ceiling. As a "multiple dwelling unit" there probably are firecode issues (beyond single-family ...


1

Sounds like a talk with the condo board is in order. Insulating the space between the floors would be beneficial for everyone, not just you. Cutting a few holes and blowing in cellulose would do a good job. Even better would be filling the space with mineral wool batts which are very good for soundproofing (and could be done as a DIY job) but that would ...


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Can more insulation be blown in between the pine ceiling and the roof? Blown? No. Sprayed? Yes. Most likely, your roof has blocking between the eaves with insect screening, and then fiberglass or rock wool insulation laying on the cedar ceiling and an air gap between the insulation and the roof decking. You can shine a flashlight in through the insect ...


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For a similar situation, I'm considering an unvented cathedral ceiling (see references). The main reason to vent an attic is to prevent warm moist indoor air from contacting the roof framing and decking. When the decking is below the dew point, the moisture condenses, the wood wets, and then an assortment of bad things happen. There's another solution to ...


1

Is it dangerous to use polyisocyanurate without covering it with drywall There are dangers: The toxicity of fumes released during fires, as described by Mazura Raising the ire of local building inspectors. It may be a code violation to install any foam board (eps, xps, poly iso) against interior walls without a fire barrier. Polyiso is normally foil ...


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Have you considered mounting sheetrock on the ceiling using resilient channel? Perhaps in addition to whatever insulation you put in the ceiling. The resilient channel will hold the sheetrock off of the joists. Since the sheetrock doesn't touch the wood, sound doesn't transmit directly from the framing to the sheetrock. Be sure to talk to somebody and/or ...


1

Typically you want the basement insulation installed with the paper (vapor barrier) facing the heated part of the home. Moisture from inside air can condense and become trapped in the insulation during cold winter months leading to mold, especially at rim joists or skirts (paper facing outside). However, if you will be spending a little more time in the ...


1

It doesn't matter to piping. As a rule, piping likes insulation. Although for cold piping, condensation may be an issue; insulation can hold that water and cause mold and mildew. It's an issue with electrical, because some types of wire need to be able to cool, and they can't do that covered in insulation, and this has caused house fires. I am hoping ...



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