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Stuffing the open area with fiberglass will absolutely help, as it will dampen/absorb the sound waves resonating between the joists. It will only go so far, though, as a significant amount of energy from foot fall traffic will still be transmitted through the floor and into the joists, causing the sound vibrations in the first place. To combat that, you'll ...


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A few things I'd like to add make clear. There is no need to insulate between floors. However, due to the Stack Effect, you may want to seal large access holes that were left open during original construction. An example is under a bathtub. An osb board cut to the space and air seal around. This will help reduce the temperature differential between floors ...


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One of the most efficient (based on thickness) insulation is polyisocyanurate foam boards. It is R-13 at 2 inches thick. These can be mounted using 2x3 studding with an air gap at the back that increases the R value a bit. You lose only 2 1/2 inches and get a huge insulation value. The stuff also handles easily. It is not cheap at a bit more than $1 per ...


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You appear to live within Climate Zone 4, where basement-wall insulation of R10 to R13 is recommended.


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The short answer is "probably not". "Best and cheapest" are contradictory terms. The idea of insulating a basement seems a little silly at first because it already has insulation: 15 feet of dirt. That provides way, way more insulation than 6" of fiberglass. If the basement is fully underground, "insulation" would be pointless (unless you have some unusual ...


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You're right that the sound blankets will do little if anything to soundproof the room. They mostly just serve to reduce echo. Hanging MLV curtains on the walls will probably make a noticeable difference at higher frequencies, but won't do much to stop bass. You can get somewhat better results if the curtains are separated from the walls by a good distance ...


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Build a box that goes over the whole fan (on the attic side) in the winter-time. weatherstrip the bottom and weight as needed. This is also my preferred approach to the attic stairs that don't seal worth a darn. Duct-board (foil-stiff_fiberglass-foil) is probably the best material if you can find it - use aluminum foil duct tape for the joints. Nobody seems ...


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Check around the farm supply places - they carry big dampers. I used to have one about 36" square (the ex still has it). Try places like here and here.


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The important comparison is not between double glazed and single glazed windows. It is between specific windows and their specifications because there are high quality single glazed windows and low quality double glazed windows and even among one group or the other, thermal and acoustical performance can vary with manufacturer and part number. Generally ...


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He said that double-glazed glass (two sheets of glass with an inert gas in between) was almost useless from the point of view of sound insulation. That is not true, but it may depend on the loudness of the outside noise, it's frequency profile and what noise level you consider acceptable inside. Double glazing window, especially when acoustic glass ...


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It doesn't matter at all. I actually used to make my crew attach to the face and they actually came back to me with this report. If you read through the report you will see that there is a 1% difference in performance if you staple face or side. It is negligible. On the flip side I will say I haven't ran across screws popping because of stapling to ...


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Attach to the stud face. The vapor barrier is not as effective if stapled to the stud sides. And as you say, the fill won't be ideal. (are your external walls 2x4 or 2x6?) The paper on the fiberglass is the vapor barrier. And a barrier is definitely needed where you live. Optionally, you can use unfaced insulation and a plastic sheet vapor barrier. ...


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Besides simply extending the roof trusses, you could 1) Reinsulate the 3.5 inches between the roof trusses with something of higher performance, like spray in polyurethane. That is about twice the insulation value of fiberglass and contributes substantially to roof/joist solidity. 2) If twice the insulation is not enough improvement, instead of extending ...


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B-vent is what should be used for exhausting gas appliances and most likely why you have a gap in a 6" escussion with a 6" pipe in it. Notice the ID and OD for B-vent. If its just an air handler for a bath fan use a flapper vent. AMPG's PDF Now you can fill the new 1/8~1/4" gap with an approved high temp caulk.


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I'd pack it carefully with rock wool or fiberglass batting. DO NOT permit the two dissimilar metals to contact each other where there's any chance of moisture getting into the contact area, or you'll get galvanic corrosion at the junction, which can lead to leakage and exhaust gases getting back into the structure.


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Rigid insulation is a good idea here. Polystyrene would be fine, but poly-iso would give you a higher R-value. I personally would look to get at least one layer on the poured basement wall to get a bit of insulation there. How to deal with a vapor barrier is complex; it depends on the construction and the kind of insulation that you are using. The best ...


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Well... THAT's an expensive house to heat, what with Lake Effect and all! I think it'd be fine to slip some styrene (pink) foam board into the gap. You could also use polyisocyanurate, but you wouldn't get the benefit of the foil facing because you wouldn't have any air gap. If you add foamboard, or even if you DON'T, the vapor barrier should ALWAYS be on ...


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Why not use a sheet of rigid foam insulation? It will block light and heat. You can cut it to size and, depending on the frame of the skylight, you may be able to wedge it in the frame without attachment devices. If you need to use something to hold it up, double faced tape on the glass will be fairly easy to remove without permanent damage to the ...


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Why not use bubble insulation wrap? It is a reflective thin material that comes in 10', 25', or 50' roles and can be anywhere from 24" to 48" wide. It is very light weight like a curtain, but does a much better job than just a fabric. The average role costs around $25,& you can put it up with painters tape. It is sold at building supply stores like Lowes ...


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The typical reason for specifying mineral wool in building construction is for fire-stopping because other materials tend to be more cost efficient insulators. Water-repellent does not mean water-proof. Mineral wool unlike - EPS or XPS - can hold moisture. Once wet, the water will negate any insulating properties because water is an excellent thermal ...


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I can verify boron treated EPS degrades over time. Boron is water soluble, so the treatment doesn't last through more than a couple wet seasons. There's apparently a new insecticidal treatment being sold under the trademark Preventol. It's unclear how many years this treatment will remain effective. In any case, I think soil treatment should be used ...


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Depends on construction details. if it's merely "the contractor was too cheap to provide attic access" (a very typical issue of cheesy contractors), you cut a hole and put in access, then apply insulation as you like. If it's a cathedral ceiling sort of arrangement (roof deck on one side of rafters, ceiling on the other) then some sort of spray/blown ...


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You're pretty much right. Having potential airflow between the insulation and the drywall does hamper the effectiveness of the insulation. Likewise, having the fiberglass exposed allows more airflow through it, which also impacts its effectiveness. Now, the air in attics tends to be relatively still (except when that attic fan of yours is running, of ...



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