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If you do find condensation then you have a more significant problem that you would want to repair. Here's why: The drywall tunnel, being exposed to sunlight should always be hotter than your house, which means that relative humidity will be lower than in your house even if infiltrated with air from your house. That also means that any condensation would ...


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The more you compress insulation the more the R value goes out the window. You should expect some settling but you shouldnt be pulling it out in chunks or sheets. I agree with Zhentar on pulling the old insulation as it is adding weight to your drywall ceiling (and you may not want to add to it) plus compacted that much it is not earning its keep. As far as ...


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Whether you can or not, you probably don't want to. If you're going to go through the trouble trouble of pulling out the fiberglass, you might as well just replace it with cellulose, which has a significantly higher R-value (around 50% higher per inch than fresh loose fill fiberglass). Your settled fiberglass, on the other hand, has a significantly higher ...


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Mineral wool (or rock wool) insulation won't burn at all. You can buy it in bats and cut it to appropriate size.


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If it was my house I would not worry about it if it was intact (but I would not disturb it either), significant friable spread by convection alone seems unlikely. If I had kids... better safe than sorry, hire an asbestos abatement firm to test and remove/replace if necessary. OSHA PEL (Personal Exposure Limit, max exposure over 8 hours on a time weighted ...


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Sounds like your problem is insufficient attic insulation. In the summer, your attic gets hot, and that heat radiates down into the second floor. In the winter, your attic gets cold, and sucks heat out of your house, aided by the stack effect. Improving the insulation on your attic flow will help both of those problems. The typical approach is to blow ...


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You can install insulating foam panels directly to the existing roof membrane (decking). The panels are backed with OSB wood panels (the OSB would face out/up). So basically it would be roof decking, then foam insulation, than bonded OSB wood decking. Over it all you would place roofing felt and roofing material. Check out this short video.


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If you want to reduce the sound of footsteps, you should use a soundproofing underlayment (which is essentially a sheet of rubber). If you want to reduce other noises in the rooms, such as voices, TV, etc., then the insulation is a good choice. You should use enough to fill the cavity; if the cavity is 100mm thick or more, then the 100mm loft insulation ...


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Your inspector should be able to grant a waiver for existing conditions if code compliance is a concern. If that is the case, I would wait and ask him/her for a solution that is acceptable. Hopefully something a bit shy of bumping the basement wall out 6", LOL. You could put the 1/2" foam behind, than cover the pipes with split foam pipe insulation. I try ...


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You could make an insulated panel that is spring-loaded to the open position. Keep it closed with door holder magnets like this .You could wire the fan and magnets to a double pole switch that cuts magnet power at the same time it turns on power to the fan. Might cost a bit and take some research... but it would be cool (pun intended)!


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Cut the foam into manageable pieces and slide into place. Use cans of spray foam insulation to fill the cracks in the sheets of foam caused by cutting. Or spray foam the entire cavity and forget the rigid foam.


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You're basically asking how to convert an unconditioned space into a conditioned space. This requires opening up the space to the existing conditioned part of the house and closing it off to the unconditioned space. I challenge your belief that it isn't vented. I suspect that it is vented - there will (or should) be some kind of air gap between the top ...


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You can always spray foam over top edge of the wall layer of XPS, this ensures that there's no air leakage from behind the XPS on the wall going up. I'd also make sure you caulk/tape all seams between XPS boards, and spray the bottoms/corners so it gets a real good seal from air movement.


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Unless the existing window is leaking, the sole criterion for judging better and worse options in this case is the likelihood of future bulk water infiltration. The current installation is performing functionally and aesthetically as part of the building envelope. Breaching and patching the envelope is not a repair, and at best will only perform equally ...


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If you just bury it, it's a potential leak and/or maintenance hassle waiting to bite you later. And hiding it makes noticing, finding, and fixing the problem harder when that happens. I have several windows under my own porch (with security bars, which I consider absolutely necessary in that situation!), and am seriously considering closing them off ...


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There's no problem per-se with covering it up. However, with a windows there's lots of chances there for leaks. And since you can't see the window from the outside and it will be behind a wall inside, you probably won't be able to see any evidence of damage or leaks until it's too late and caused significant damage to your new walls and flooring. Based on ...


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If (and it's a big if) you can find a company in the business that won't have to travel too far, this might be a good candidate for a spray foam (usually polyurethane) roof, applied on top of the existing roof. More commonly seen on commercial buildings, but a flat roof is a flat roof... If you cannot find a company who can get to you and do it for ...


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The page http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/how-build-insulated-cathedral-ceiling is a compendium of several other pages covers the subject pretty well, though it is targeted at cathedral ceilings, all of it applies equally well to a moderately sloped or level ceiling. Keeping moisture out is the prime consideration for unvented rafters. ...


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The principle behind a flat roof is the same as with a sloped roof: keep moisture out of the uninsulated space of the roof. Most roof systems require venting. Venting is necessary to remove any moisture that comes from the inside of the home into the insulated space and causes condensation. Condensation causes mold and other moisture problems. As long as ...


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The insulation is not holding heat (i.e. acting as a thermal mass). The likelier problem is that your attic itself is what's holding heat. Attic heat gain during the summer is primarily caused by sunshine. The sun hits your shingles and heats them up, and that heat radiates down into the attic. The darker the shingles, the more pronounced the effect. As a ...


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Since it is a sauna for occasional use, and not a full blown living space, I would build it like old school carpentry like you already suggested with one improvement. Outside-going in, Cedar siding, tyvek or other breathable air barrier, OSB or plywood subsiding, 2X6 studs with R-19 fiberglass insulation, then your cedar interior finish. This arrangement of ...


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Yes, insulate above and below to the best of your ability. Do not shove anything into the conduit or your going to have one pissed off electrician next time something needs doing. The 14in x ~2ft hole (the sub panel) in the insulation is negligible compared to any air infiltration that may be coming from outside. IE, the garage rolling door, poor ...


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I personally would not insert any insulation anywhere inside an appliance, even if you see a spot where it looks like another model is insulated. You risk starting a fire, blocking airflow or vents, trapping moisture... Also note that the broiler will get well over 2000 °F, even a normal household candle can be 2500°F. So I wouldn't necessarily consider your ...


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Vapor barrier goes on the warm side of the insulation (averaged year round) If, on average, the garage is warmer than the house, vapor barrier goes on the garage side. If, on average, it's cooler, it goes on the house side. If you rarely close the windows, you probably don't need one at all. Penetrations should be sealed with something like acoustic ...


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I've found that the plastic for old windows in the winter saves about 30% percent on heating costs. The plastic in the summer may help somewhat but weather stripping boosts the plastic's effect in the winter and allows you to open windows in the summer. I would most recommend weatherstripping for the summer because natural cooling can save a bundle! I use ...



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