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List of issues: Getting the space conditioned. This may be really easy or insanely difficult. Depends on what is on the other walls of bathroom and where your ducts are in your house. Getting electric. Should be no big deal. Getting water. Might be a bigger deal than electric but probably not a huge thing. Getting exit plumbing. Given that the ...


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Generally speaking building anything on top of garage isn't be idea in the world, but I'm guessing that you are in need and it's not because you have nothing better to do, it can be done, and if you ask me it is not more complicated than doing it anywhere else. First and the most important thing: WATER PROOFING and THERMAL INSULATION. You should have two ...


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Certainly seems like it should be some improvement over the traditional method - how much is not clear, since the bags will presumably pack down and lose most of the insulating air spaces under soil pressure, but even "more or less solid" LDPE would be a slight thermal improvement over soil, if you have access to a lot of cement bags. A rigid foam ...


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Actually adding insulation is both beneficial for sound reduction and heat retention. When you insulate your floors you prevent heat loss from your basement, especially if you live in Northern States where it gets cold like me. This also helps keep rooms at even temperatures which makes your HVAC system operate more efficiently. Also, if you're outside ...


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OP here, I had 2 electricians come look at the situation. 1st: kept repeating how it's against code, how the walls are spray foamed, oh my, you would have thought a kid was there with his hand in an open junction or something, the guy was just beside himself with it. He suggested replacing the wires from the panel, up the wall and across that floor. He went ...


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The only fix to be NEC compliant is "REPLACE THE WIRE". You'll never have to worry about the repair when you're going to take a nap or go to bed. We've all heard the horror stories about "jury rigging" and "baling wire" electrical fixes. If you are physically unable to get under your house, ask a neighbor like me that is electrically proficient, to help you. ...


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My old physics teacher would give you an 'A' for simply creating this question. It is important to remember that whatever solution you choose must fix the problem, and not just move the problem to a different place - AKA: the Wack-A-Mole paradox. I think the first step is to get an infrared thermometer,I chose this one,but pick your own vendor and price ...


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What he's suggesting would be to make the attic inside the building envelope, therefore you'd be heating and cooling the attic along with the house. You either need insulation at the attic floor or attic ceiling. One or the other is the building envelope. If you google some of the terms you can learn a lot. If the house is a standard, single open roof I'd ...


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Knob and Tube - cool, in a science museum way. I think you have the right idea. Replacing them is of course ideal, but the money thing is a reality. I would use concrete backer board, like in a shower, drywall can absorb water. Glue the edges of the backer board together with some firestop caulk. Build a 3/4 inch plywood frame around the outside this, of ...


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I am in the same situation adding some recess lighting, i chose to hold off the installation of the junction box and get some wood to raise it. Reasoning, was not sure about code, it's easy to do and will be better for me or anyone who may want to add on later to the box. Some wood a nail gun or some plates and some screws and your ready to go.


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Just to point out, if your roof is un-penetrable by water, for example if it's an epdm rubber roof, water can pool against the roof behind ice dams and will not enter the house. Ice dams are nearly impossible to prevent in certain weather. Here in Massachusetts, I'm hard pressed to find a house without some ice dams, even brand new houses. Clearing the ...


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The problems associated with insulating brick, block, or concret walls vary depending upon environment, construction, and even sunlight. I is critical to get a for sure assessment of the overall situation. This is an instance where money spent on a documented professional consultant money well spent. I have come behind DYI folks many times....some of them ...


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Should work fine-ish. Use more UN-Faced insulation to avoid moisture problems. It's only fine-ish (rather than fine) because the pipe is more than halfway through the total insulation, leaving it somewhat subject to freezing if it gets cold in the crawlspace.


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I would install a counterweight so that most of the door's weight is removed from laying on the ceiling trim or whatever stops it. Maybe all but ten pounds (4 kg) so the door stays closed tightly. A rope, pulley, and some weight should be all that's needed.


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Building Air Standard (BAS) is sometimes referred to as BAS - ACH This appears to be a (I begin to think deliberately, after quite a few vague web results) slippery number to track down, but it appears to be essentially an estimation of "natural air changes per hour" based on the blower door test. Simply calling it "Estimated ACH" would apparently be too ...


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Is the seal on the sump cover in good condition? Also, from the look of it the floor in question is the second level (i.e. half-dug next to a deeper, full-dug basement) correct? Only if you are really confident in the (other) sump pump in the lower basement should you consider doing anything at all to modify that pump well or piping. Sumps are not usually ...


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Air sealing is more important than vapor sealing. All assemblies (wall and ceiling) need to be able to dry out. If you prevent air passage AND provide sufficient insulation to prevent condensation, you don't need or want an impervious layer. Cables,plumbing vents, ducts and lighting fixtures are notorious sources for air leaks. These can be stopped ...


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I have a faucet inside the garage that is frozen. It's a standard spigot and I can't get to the pipe that feeds it so I can't install a shut off or replace with a freeze proof spigot. My plan it to use one of these covers along with a 7 watt night light inside. I may put a tin can inside as well. Maybe this idea will help someone else.


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Solution offered by iLikeDirt is good but not complete; actually it doesn't solve the biggest problem. Fact is that your home has insulation problem that's why ground floor is so cold. You can and should put insulation around perimeter, but you should also out some insolation on the floor. Best solution would be to put it under a concrete slab, but since ...


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Sounds like your concrete slab is un-insulated around the perimeter and/or the bottom. The very conductive flooring material (tile) doesn't help; the combination of these two means that the floor has very little thermal resistance to heat flow, so you constantly lose heat through the slab. If the heat you generate is quickly rising through the second floor, ...


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To make long story short from what I see my best guess is that you have condensation issue. Most likely since your pump is in the corner there is somewhere thermal insulation missing and since you said that there is draft that means cold air is coming inside. Where from?.... I cannot be 100% sure. My money would be on the wall because most likely places ...



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