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Do I need to install the barrier in a crawlspace? Yes you need to install the barrier regardless of where it is. What would I use as a barrier since I don't have studs to hang wall board on? Is there an alternative that I am missing? You don't need studs to install drywall. You could install furring strips and then attach the drywall to this. ...


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A lot of good suggestions were given, but in my case it ultimately was two things: Poor insulation - the energy audit found the insulation was about 8 to 10 inches too low for our area. Given the age of the house, it wasn't surprising that this needed to be rectified. Soffit vents - or lack thereof. I had no soffit vents to ventilate the attic properly. ...


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Spray foam is fine here. Hire it out, don't try yourself. You won't save much if any money and this stuff is better installed by pros. Make sure the roof decking is bone-dry on the day they install it. Determine what kind of R-value you want, too. The stuff is so expensive that installers will often try to convince you that 2 to 4 inches is sufficient for a ...


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The tongue-and-groove wood planks conceal insulation above then, probably fiberglass batts between the rafters. As you've observed, they are clearly insufficient, because the room is too hot. There are two safe ways to improve the situation: Add more insulation underneath the existing ceiling wood, then install a vapor retarder (retarder, not barrier. A ...


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The HVAC guy has a hammer, and your problem looks like a nail. More ducts! Bigger equipment! Wrong. Your problem is easy to diagnose: this room's ceiling is terribly under-insulated. When people convert attics into rooms, they almost always (like 99% of the time) insulate the ceiling incorrectly and insufficiently. You need a lot more insulation; the lack of ...


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Ecnerwal is right that the if the footing is uninsulated, some of the heat will escape into the dirt under the house, where it will sort of be stored due to (I hope) your insulated slab perimeter walls keeping the heat in. However, unless that space is fully insulated on all sides (e.g. under the dirt on the same plane as the footer), there will be heat ...


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If this will be used as a serious heating appliance, (I'm inferring from "masonry heater") not merely decoration (as many fireplaces are), I'd go with uninsulated footing, especially if the stemwall is insulated - whatever thermal bridging takes place will be to the "bubble" of dirt inside the stemwall, which can play into your thermal mass. ...


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It doesn't make sense to do the inside before the roof has been replaced. The drywall will most likely end up getting damaged when the roof is being demoed and new sheathing is installed. The contractors may inadvertently step on the backside of the drywall and cave it in. There is also a big chance of some water damage. Keeping the original lathe for the ...


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It really depends on a lot of factors...namely your climate and how much space you have in the ceiling rafters. Ideally, you'd insulate with spray foam. That will give you the best r-value and act as a vapor barrier. You should be able to do it separate from the new roof but it may be a lot easier to just do it all at once. (It's a lot easier to toss lathe ...


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Here is a video and pamphlet showing how to do what rifaco suggests, as well as some other things to improve window AC efficiency.


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When it comes to what comes first both ways are acceptable but would be better if you do it all at once. Now when we speak about new roof cover material and procedures depend on type of covering material and there are so many options. But to put it in one word just apply standard procedures (if you use tiles go with the lathe etc.).Now once you cover the ...


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Your research is pointing you in the right direction: the need for attic ventilation is overblown (pardon the pun). The attic fan is useless; don't use it, because it will cost you more money than it will ever save you. The air inlets are the soffit vents. What are the outlets? Gable vents? a ridge vent? Turtle vents? Whatever they are, they're probably ...


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Are you saying that you manually insulate the window on the inside with foam board to prevent heat loss? If so, this is completely expected. What's happening is that the insulation is doing its job by preventing the movement of heat, thereby keeping the glass colder. However, it sounds like the installation is not airtight. As a result, any moist air that ...


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I would continue investigating upwards from there. Have seen similar situations where the roofing above the point had been set too flat: rainwater (or thawing frost) can run backwards under the overhang to the wall. If you have a beam or something coming out of the wall at that point, water can ingress through capillarity in the space around it. Off topic, ...


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You are paying a premium for what you want. Businesses can and do charge more for doing jobs they don't want to do, to do them differently than they would typically do, or to work with someone they see as difficult. At the same time, no one is forcing you to do any of this. If you want someone else to do the work, get multiple bids and take the one you ...



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