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somebody did not know what the heck they were doing. the sill is meant to be wide enough and placed so as to be under both the joists and the "exterior board" or header. the header would then be the same width as the joists thus filling the space between the sill and the subfloor.


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You'll want to look at how deep that sloped concrete block is to the outside, and what's on the other side. Also, investigate how the home is insulated above this. I try to keep the insulation barrier continuous between floors to eliminate paths between the insulation to the inside of the home. A rim joist, like exterior sheathing, is a poor insulator by ...


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Probably won't make any noticeable difference. Normally the bottom of the water tank portion is insulated if electric, and not remotely in contact with the floor if fuel-fired (there's a burner between the bottom of the tank and the floor, and a substantial amount of space taken up by the burner assembly.) I'd save the idea until you were replacing the ...


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Fiberglass is probably not that good for you just like many other things you breath in on a daily basis. I would recommend that next time you wear a dust mask and goggles. The good news is that it does not cause cancer. It does case skin, eye and lung irritation. I have had long term exposure to fiberglass over the past 35 years and so far I have not noticed ...


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Adding a little more detail above the other answers, plus recommendations. Fiberglass is made of fibers of glass (duh!). When you inhale them into your lungs, they are not easily broken down by your body if at all. If you don't like the idea of getting wood or metal particles in your lungs, then you shouldn't inhale glass fibers either. For small ...


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Fiberglass can be bad for the lungs: http://www.lung.org/healthy-air/home/resources/fiberglass.html However, for it to be a real issue, one needs a lot of exposure...typically someone that works with it daily as part of their job. The amount of contact a typical homeowner would be exposed to in their lifetime is not likely something to lose too much sleep ...


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Many variables here but for most people this would not be a problem. I have been working on old homes for 30 years and have popped up into attics without proper gear countless times. Sometimes there is some residual irritation to lungs for a day or so and skin irritation form contact with fiberglass. That said - Wear a mask, a good mask, not just a cheap ...


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Fiberglass can cause mild irritation but is not dangerous. You'll be fine.


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I would wait a day or two, and then see a doctor if it doesn't go away. I once had to army crawl through insulation to run some cabling in my house. Took me about an hour as well, and I didn't wear a mask either. The coughing took a few hours to go away, but I am fine :) Insulation is nasty stuff though - I would highly recommend a gas mask and long ...


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Attempting to put caulking to the wall under the base board with the carpet installed is very likely going to result in caulking spread out onto the carpet - also if you ever have to pull it temporarily - the parts embedded into the caulk will separate from the rest of the carpet. Unfortunately, placing the caulking under the baseboard with the carpet ...


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I have a FLIR camera. It's awesome, but it's expensive and not necessarily the best tool for detecting air leaks. An IR camera is too slow; you won't use it unless you have more dedication than most. What you want is a fog machine. Turn it on inside the house, close all the windows but one, and put a box fan in that window blowing air into the house. This ...


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A FLIR (infrared) or thermal imager is still the best way; you can rent them pretty easy and cheap, even at Home Depot http://www.flir.com/homedepot/


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A thermal imaging gun will show you all the hot and cold spots inside your house, but they are very expensive. What I did was I purchased a infrared thermometer gun at my local harbor freight. It cost about $15.00 Then I went around took all the temperatures throughout the house. I found in my basement the rim joists were not insulated, I also found my ...


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Of course you should. Then be sure you have or put you in a fart fan to remove the moisture and humidity from the restroom. Make sure the fart fan is vented thru the roof and not into your attic or soffit vents.


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You will need to get in the attic if you have access to it and remove as much of the insulation above the area as you can with an insulation removing vacuum or shop vac. Then do your repair and replace the blown insulation back in place. Removing the dry wall without doing this will end up with a big mess.


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You will need a specialty insulation blower and not the one you find at home depot or lowes. You would drill holes at the top of the cavity and blow in your insulation being careful not to overfill and blow the dry wall out. The process is slow and time consuming but can save you a lot of money especially if your walls are not insulated.


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Cellulose insulation would be a great choice if you have living quarters above. The cellulose insulation is more dense and will help control air movement and drafts. Cellulose Insulation


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I did an area above a garage using a mud (drywall) mixer on a drill and bent wire to fluff it up. For the few bales that I used, it worked well. I used a leaf rake to level it out. On flat ceilings with room to work it would be OK.


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0.1 CFM air leakage is not exactly what I would call "very tight," but it's not terrible for a sliding door. Regardless, this looks like a problem with the installation more so than the door. The trim is covering the gap/joint between the door and the rough opening; if that's open to the exterior or not perfectly sealed off from it, then the trim is doing ...


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This sounds like a good candidate for the procedure you outline, done with loose fill cellulose insulation, with two caveats. First of all, while this could conceivably be a DIY project, you can't rent a typical cellulose blower from Home Depot or the like because it doesn't have the power to really densely pack the stuff in there; as a result, the material ...


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The 'Mike Holmes' way is also the Building Science Corporation's recommendation--though they don't recommend any formal vapor barrier--just XPS and tape. The idea is that XPS is a vapor retarder, but can ultimately dry one way or the other if it ever has to. That said, if you are absolutely 100% sure your basement will be forever dry, it probably doesn't ...


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That's fine. The thing you want to make sure is that you seal off any air paths from the inside of the basement to the rim joist, the reason being that if you insulate it but let humid air hit it, that air can condense on it and cause rot. That's why they tell you to use rigid foam--which is an air barrier--instead of something like air-permeable fiberglass ...


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What is your heating method? Most are somewhat adjustable, though this may not be obvious if you don't know what to look for (i.e. baseboard hot water generally has a flap that can be open, partially closed, or fully closed on the top section of the baseboard, which affects heat delivery.) If you turn up the heat delivery in the room that is colder, and/or ...


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The best solution would be to fill the 2x4 cavities with foam. This could be done either by filling each cavity from the top or by removing the siding. You have to be careful to use the correct foam (non-expanding) if you are going to fill the wall cavity without removing the siding. There are many companies that sell non-expanding foam kits and here's a ...


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Provided you don't have knob-and-tube wiring, this one is easy. Remove the vinyl siding, cut holes through the EPS foam and the sheathing at the top of each stud bay, and inject dense-packed cellulose into the empty stud bays. Should be pretty cheap and help a ton. I wouldn't use retrofit-style non-expanding foam. It'll be more expensive, highly flammable, ...


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If you're going to rip off the siding, then insulate from the outside. If it were my house, I would remove the clapboard and sheathing, then spray in expanding foam. Follow the recommendation of the foam insulation manufacturer for how to finish the outside before you install your vinyl siding. Another good alternative is to blow in loose insulation. Since ...


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If the room above is warm and the cellar is cold, the batts were installed upside down if the paper face is towards the cold (cellar) side. The batts mostly fall from being full of condensation (water) when in that orientation. In any case batts should have more support on a ceiling than just the backing, whether that be wooden laths or sheetrock. Replace, ...


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Foam board should never be exposed, it should always covered with a fire retardant layer like drywall. So if it is installed correctly, your breaker box would never come in direct contact with the XPS and you don't have a problem. If it is exposed, then you have a larger problem then just the breaker box making contact with it.


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Heat is a byproduct of energy use. The electrical panel should not be generating heat in normal circumstances and doing so would be symptomatic of a hazardous condition. Thus, it is normal to insulate around an electrical panel.


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There's no particular reason that it would be asbestos. Cardboard would work just as well as an insulator behind the foil reflector, and wouldn't be any more of a fire hazard than any other boxes you have in your house. I'm not making any promises -- asbestos was a Miracle Material when it was new, and was used for all sorts of things that didn't absolutely ...


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There are covers you can purchase, or easily make, to insulate your attic fan. The cover attaches to the bottom of the fan (inside your house) with magnets or velcro. The magnets are cosmetically more appealing, as you'll see the velcro when the insulation is not on. It's very convenient, because you don't have to climb up into your attic to remove it ...


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Spray foam would not be either an ideal or recommended procedure to cover up all the wires where they exit from the main power panel. The first moment when some electrical problem needs troubleshooting, you need to add a new circuit or an existing wire needs moving you will be cussing that you ever thought of spraying in foam in this area.


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I would caulk on both of them. The purpose of the caulk it to prevent air leaks and convection, and not sealing both will reduce the effectiveness of the insulation a bit.


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Sealing the seams will not increase the R-value of the insulation. However, sealing the seams is important as an air infiltration/moisture seal, preventing air from infiltrating and, as a result, preventing moisture (condensation) from occurring between the foam board and batt. Typically expanding foam creates a better, longer-lasting seal than tape.



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