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The important comparison is not between double glazed and single glazed windows. It is between specific windows and their specifications because there are high quality single glazed windows and low quality double glazed windows and even among one group or the other, thermal and acoustical performance can vary with manufacturer and part number. Generally ...


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He said that double-glazed glass (two sheets of glass with an inert gas in between) was almost useless from the point of view of sound insulation. That is not true, but it may depend on the loudness of the outside noise, it's frequency profile and what noise level you consider acceptable inside. Double glazing window, especially when acoustic glass ...


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It doesn't matter at all. I actually used to make my crew attach to the face and they actually came back to me with this report. If you read through the report you will see that there is a 1% difference in performance if you staple face or side. It is negligible. On the flip side I will say I haven't ran across screws popping because of stapling to ...


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Attach to the stud face. The vapor barrier is not as effective if stapled to the stud sides. And as you say, the fill won't be ideal. (are your external walls 2x4 or 2x6?) The paper on the fiberglass is the vapor barrier. And a barrier is definitely needed where you live. Optionally, you can use unfaced insulation and a plastic sheet vapor barrier. ...


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Besides simply extending the roof trusses, you could 1) Reinsulate the 3.5 inches between the roof trusses with something of higher performance, like spray in polyurethane. That is about twice the insulation value of fiberglass and contributes substantially to roof/joist solidity. 2) If twice the insulation is not enough improvement, instead of extending ...


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B-vent is what should be used for exhausting gas appliances and most likely why you have a gap in a 6" escussion with a 6" pipe in it. Notice the ID and OD for B-vent. If its just an air handler for a bath fan use a flapper vent. AMPG's PDF Now you can fill the new 1/8~1/4" gap with an approved high temp caulk.


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I'd pack it carefully with rock wool or fiberglass batting. DO NOT permit the two dissimilar metals to contact each other where there's any chance of moisture getting into the contact area, or you'll get galvanic corrosion at the junction, which can lead to leakage and exhaust gases getting back into the structure.


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Rigid insulation is a good idea here. Polystyrene would be fine, but poly-iso would give you a higher R-value. I personally would look to get at least one layer on the poured basement wall to get a bit of insulation there. How to deal with a vapor barrier is complex; it depends on the construction and the kind of insulation that you are using. The best ...


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Well... THAT's an expensive house to heat, what with Lake Effect and all! I think it'd be fine to slip some styrene (pink) foam board into the gap. You could also use polyisocyanurate, but you wouldn't get the benefit of the foil facing because you wouldn't have any air gap. If you add foamboard, or even if you DON'T, the vapor barrier should ALWAYS be on ...


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Why not use a sheet of rigid foam insulation? It will block light and heat. You can cut it to size and, depending on the frame of the skylight, you may be able to wedge it in the frame without attachment devices. If you need to use something to hold it up, double faced tape on the glass will be fairly easy to remove without permanent damage to the ...


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Why not use bubble insulation wrap? It is a reflective thin material that comes in 10', 25', or 50' roles and can be anywhere from 24" to 48" wide. It is very light weight like a curtain, but does a much better job than just a fabric. The average role costs around $25,& you can put it up with painters tape. It is sold at building supply stores like Lowes ...


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The typical reason for specifying mineral wool in building construction is for fire-stopping because other materials tend to be more cost efficient insulators. Water-repellent does not mean water-proof. Mineral wool unlike - EPS or XPS - can hold moisture. Once wet, the water will negate any insulating properties because water is an excellent thermal ...


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I can verify boron treated EPS degrades over time. Boron is water soluble, so the treatment doesn't last through more than a couple wet seasons. There's apparently a new insecticidal treatment being sold under the trademark Preventol. It's unclear how many years this treatment will remain effective. In any case, I think soil treatment should be used ...


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Depends on construction details. if it's merely "the contractor was too cheap to provide attic access" (a very typical issue of cheesy contractors), you cut a hole and put in access, then apply insulation as you like. If it's a cathedral ceiling sort of arrangement (roof deck on one side of rafters, ceiling on the other) then some sort of spray/blown ...


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You're pretty much right. Having potential airflow between the insulation and the drywall does hamper the effectiveness of the insulation. Likewise, having the fiberglass exposed allows more airflow through it, which also impacts its effectiveness. Now, the air in attics tends to be relatively still (except when that attic fan of yours is running, of ...


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If you do find condensation then you have a more significant problem that you would want to repair. Here's why: The drywall tunnel, being exposed to sunlight should always be hotter than your house, which means that relative humidity will be lower than in your house even if infiltrated with air from your house. That also means that any condensation would ...


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The more you compress insulation the more the R value goes out the window. You should expect some settling but you shouldnt be pulling it out in chunks or sheets. I agree with Zhentar on pulling the old insulation as it is adding weight to your drywall ceiling (and you may not want to add to it) plus compacted that much it is not earning its keep. As far as ...


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Whether you can or not, you probably don't want to. If you're going to go through the trouble trouble of pulling out the fiberglass, you might as well just replace it with cellulose, which has a significantly higher R-value (around 50% higher per inch than fresh loose fill fiberglass). Your settled fiberglass, on the other hand, has a significantly higher ...


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Mineral wool (or rock wool) insulation won't burn at all. You can buy it in bats and cut it to appropriate size.


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If it was my house I would not worry about it if it was intact (but I would not disturb it either), significant friable spread by convection alone seems unlikely. If I had kids... better safe than sorry, hire an asbestos abatement firm to test and remove/replace if necessary. OSHA PEL (Personal Exposure Limit, max exposure over 8 hours on a time weighted ...


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Sounds like your problem is insufficient attic insulation. In the summer, your attic gets hot, and that heat radiates down into the second floor. In the winter, your attic gets cold, and sucks heat out of your house, aided by the stack effect. Improving the insulation on your attic flow will help both of those problems. The typical approach is to blow ...


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You can install insulating foam panels directly to the existing roof membrane (decking). The panels are backed with OSB wood panels (the OSB would face out/up). So basically it would be roof decking, then foam insulation, than bonded OSB wood decking. Over it all you would place roofing felt and roofing material. Check out this short video.


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If you want to reduce the sound of footsteps, you should use a soundproofing underlayment (which is essentially a sheet of rubber). If you want to reduce other noises in the rooms, such as voices, TV, etc., then the insulation is a good choice. You should use enough to fill the cavity; if the cavity is 100mm thick or more, then the 100mm loft insulation ...


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Your inspector should be able to grant a waiver for existing conditions if code compliance is a concern. If that is the case, I would wait and ask him/her for a solution that is acceptable. Hopefully something a bit shy of bumping the basement wall out 6", LOL. You could put the 1/2" foam behind, than cover the pipes with split foam pipe insulation. I try ...


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You could make an insulated panel that is spring-loaded to the open position. Keep it closed with door holder magnets like this .You could wire the fan and magnets to a double pole switch that cuts magnet power at the same time it turns on power to the fan. Might cost a bit and take some research... but it would be cool (pun intended)!


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Cut the foam into manageable pieces and slide into place. Use cans of spray foam insulation to fill the cracks in the sheets of foam caused by cutting. Or spray foam the entire cavity and forget the rigid foam.



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