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Roxul is safer than pink or fiberglass insulation, and a few pieces against your windows will be quite safe (but not beautiful). However, if your basement walls are not insulated, I doubt putting Roxul in the windows will make any perceivable difference to your basement temp in general. If your basement is insulated, you will likely have noticed that cold ...


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Roxul is our #1 choice of insulation in exposed areas. It is non-flammable. After installation it releases very little dust comparatively. The dust released has really no harmful effects other than slight irritation. It molds and conforms stronger than fiberglass and other roll insulation. Just make your cuts bigger than the area and compact the ...


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That's how it's done, don't forget to apply chemical tape to the seams and seal the areas around the wall prior to installing it. You won't have another chance with out removing the wall first.


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You can certainly put the R30 batts in between the 2x6 collar ties, but it won't result in an R30 ceiling installation, due the thermal bridging of the collar ties and the resultant gap above them between the insulation batts. I think abetter plan might be to stuff the 6" thick insulation in between collar ties as normal, then lay another layer of 6" thick ...


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If the apartment is a 8" thick "cinder-block" wall with no insulation, then it's R value is likely around 1.5-2. If it's a concrete wall, it's R-value is around 3.8-4. In any case, 1" thick polystyrene foam has an R-value of 5, and ½" drywall is about .5, so adding the foam and drywall (combined R-value of 5.5) over your existing drywall will more than ...


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What I ended up doing was similar to what people suggested by putting up a temporary barrier. I waited for drywall on one side (I was lucky to be able to do that because I had an unconditioned space), then I put the cotton insulation in and held it in with R11 kraft faced. Considering it's for sound control the double insulation was not a bad thing (so ...


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Probably too late for you, but when I had a similar issue I wrapped the back in this sheet material before insulating. It was easy to install with staples and then I sprayed foam around the edges. On the inside where some bays were too wide for the insulation that I had at hand, I just put a piece of duct tape across the bay at the top, middle and bottom, to ...


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Moisture-cured polyurethane foam (e.g. Dow Great Stuff), once cured, is just about impossible to remove by solvents or chemicals. Your only solution is mechanical removal (sanding, cutting, sandblasting, scraping, wire wheel, explosives, etc). Your choice of which depends on the substrate, the environs, and whether you're angling for a Darwin Award.



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