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Do I need to install the barrier in a crawlspace? Yes you need to install the barrier regardless of where it is. What would I use as a barrier since I don't have studs to hang wall board on? Is there an alternative that I am missing? You don't need studs to install drywall. You could install furring strips and then attach the drywall to this. ...


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The tongue-and-groove wood planks conceal insulation above then, probably fiberglass batts between the rafters. As you've observed, they are clearly insufficient, because the room is too hot. There are two safe ways to improve the situation: Add more insulation underneath the existing ceiling wood, then install a vapor retarder (retarder, not barrier. A ...


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The HVAC guy has a hammer, and your problem looks like a nail. More ducts! Bigger equipment! Wrong. Your problem is easy to diagnose: this room's ceiling is terribly under-insulated. When people convert attics into rooms, they almost always (like 99% of the time) insulate the ceiling incorrectly and insufficiently. You need a lot more insulation; the lack of ...


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Ecnerwal is right that the if the footing is uninsulated, some of the heat will escape into the dirt under the house, where it will sort of be stored due to (I hope) your insulated slab perimeter walls keeping the heat in. However, unless that space is fully insulated on all sides (e.g. under the dirt on the same plane as the footer), there will be heat ...


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If this will be used as a serious heating appliance, (I'm inferring from "masonry heater") not merely decoration (as many fireplaces are), I'd go with uninsulated footing, especially if the stemwall is insulated - whatever thermal bridging takes place will be to the "bubble" of dirt inside the stemwall, which can play into your thermal mass. ...


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I would not recommend additional insulating wrap for the unit itself, this could cause it to overheat and malfunction... or even catch on fire. You should be able to find the model and serial #s on a placard inside the door. Check the manufacturer's minimum clearance requirements, if the cabinets are too close then you have the wrong oven or improperly ...


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A lot of good suggestions were given, but in my case it ultimately was two things: Poor insulation - the energy audit found the insulation was about 8 to 10 inches too low for our area. Given the age of the house, it wasn't surprising that this needed to be rectified. Soffit vents - or lack thereof. I had no soffit vents to ventilate the attic properly. ...


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Spray foam is fine here. Hire it out, don't try yourself. You won't save much if any money and this stuff is better installed by pros. Make sure the roof decking is bone-dry on the day they install it. Determine what kind of R-value you want, too. The stuff is so expensive that installers will often try to convince you that 2 to 4 inches is sufficient for a ...


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It doesn't make sense to do the inside before the roof has been replaced. The drywall will most likely end up getting damaged when the roof is being demoed and new sheathing is installed. The contractors may inadvertently step on the backside of the drywall and cave it in. There is also a big chance of some water damage. Keeping the original lathe for the ...


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It really depends on a lot of factors...namely your climate and how much space you have in the ceiling rafters. Ideally, you'd insulate with spray foam. That will give you the best r-value and act as a vapor barrier. You should be able to do it separate from the new roof but it may be a lot easier to just do it all at once. (It's a lot easier to toss lathe ...



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