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3

Fiberglass can cause mild irritation but is not dangerous. You'll be fine.


3

This sounds like a good candidate for the procedure you outline, done with loose fill cellulose insulation, with two caveats. First of all, while this could conceivably be a DIY project, you can't rent a typical cellulose blower from Home Depot or the like because it doesn't have the power to really densely pack the stuff in there; as a result, the material ...


3

A thermal imaging gun will show you all the hot and cold spots inside your house, but they are very expensive. What I did was I purchased a infrared thermometer gun at my local harbor freight. It cost about $15.00 Then I went around took all the temperatures throughout the house. I found in my basement the rim joists were not insulated, I also found my ...


2

What is your heating method? Most are somewhat adjustable, though this may not be obvious if you don't know what to look for (i.e. baseboard hot water generally has a flap that can be open, partially closed, or fully closed on the top section of the baseboard, which affects heat delivery.) If you turn up the heat delivery in the room that is colder, and/or ...


2

Provided you don't have knob-and-tube wiring, this one is easy. Remove the vinyl siding, cut holes through the EPS foam and the sheathing at the top of each stud bay, and inject dense-packed cellulose into the empty stud bays. Should be pretty cheap and help a ton. I wouldn't use retrofit-style non-expanding foam. It'll be more expensive, highly flammable, ...


2

Fiberglass can be bad for the lungs: http://www.lung.org/healthy-air/home/resources/fiberglass.html However, for it to be a real issue, one needs a lot of exposure...typically someone that works with it daily as part of their job. The amount of contact a typical homeowner would be exposed to in their lifetime is not likely something to lose too much sleep ...


2

Probably won't make any noticeable difference. Normally the bottom of the water tank portion is insulated if electric, and not remotely in contact with the floor if fuel-fired (there's a burner between the bottom of the tank and the floor, and a substantial amount of space taken up by the burner assembly.) I'd save the idea until you were replacing the ...


1

Adding a little more detail above the other answers, plus recommendations. Fiberglass is made of fibers of glass (duh!). When you inhale them into your lungs, they are not easily broken down by your body if at all. If you don't like the idea of getting wood or metal particles in your lungs, then you shouldn't inhale glass fibers either. For small ...


1

Attempting to put caulking to the wall under the base board with the carpet installed is very likely going to result in caulking spread out onto the carpet - also if you ever have to pull it temporarily - the parts embedded into the caulk will separate from the rest of the carpet. Unfortunately, placing the caulking under the baseboard with the carpet ...


1

You will need a specialty insulation blower and not the one you find at home depot or lowes. You would drill holes at the top of the cavity and blow in your insulation being careful not to overfill and blow the dry wall out. The process is slow and time consuming but can save you a lot of money especially if your walls are not insulated.


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0.1 CFM air leakage is not exactly what I would call "very tight," but it's not terrible for a sliding door. Regardless, this looks like a problem with the installation more so than the door. The trim is covering the gap/joint between the door and the rough opening; if that's open to the exterior or not perfectly sealed off from it, then the trim is doing ...


1

The 'Mike Holmes' way is also the Building Science Corporation's recommendation--though they don't recommend any formal vapor barrier--just XPS and tape. The idea is that XPS is a vapor retarder, but can ultimately dry one way or the other if it ever has to. That said, if you are absolutely 100% sure your basement will be forever dry, it probably doesn't ...


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If the room above is warm and the cellar is cold, the batts were installed upside down if the paper face is towards the cold (cellar) side. The batts mostly fall from being full of condensation (water) when in that orientation. In any case batts should have more support on a ceiling than just the backing, whether that be wooden laths or sheetrock. Replace, ...


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Sealing the seams will not increase the R-value of the insulation. However, sealing the seams is important as an air infiltration/moisture seal, preventing air from infiltrating and, as a result, preventing moisture (condensation) from occurring between the foam board and batt. Typically expanding foam creates a better, longer-lasting seal than tape.


1

Cellulose insulation would be a great choice if you have living quarters above. The cellulose insulation is more dense and will help control air movement and drafts. Cellulose Insulation



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