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Polyisocyanurate, AKA: PIR, polyiso, or ISO –Wiki During a fire, polyisocyanurate can release a considerably higher level of toxins than other insulating materials. Other than PVC (which will release dioxin), I can't think of a worse building material to inhale fumes from. Other types of foam might be 'better' but all of them should have a fire barrier. I ...


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Do I need to install the barrier in a crawlspace? Yes you need to install the barrier regardless of where it is. What would I use as a barrier since I don't have studs to hang wall board on? Is there an alternative that I am missing? You don't need studs to install drywall. You could install furring strips and then attach the drywall to this. ...


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Since the ceiling in the attic is too low to make it into a living space, you should only insulate the floor. Insulating the ceiling will create a new heating zone, and essentially you will be paying more to heat your attic. Another reason you wouldn't want to insulate the ceiling rafters is that you can wind up with ice dam issues. The roof could get too ...


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With an asbestos test kit or a professional asbestos testing firm. If you're buying the house, you may be able to get the sellers to pay for this.


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I would not recommend additional insulating wrap for the unit itself, this could cause it to overheat and malfunction... or even catch on fire. You should be able to find the model and serial #s on a placard inside the door. Check the manufacturer's minimum clearance requirements, if the cabinets are too close then you have the wrong oven or improperly ...


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Dense-packed (and only dense-packed, not loose-blown) cellulose is better in walls than fiberglass batts, for a couple of reasons. It has a slightly higher R-value per inch. Is is hygroscopic, meaning that it can take up moisture; in doing this, it can protect the structural wood should it ever get wet. Dense-packed cellulose can improve the airtightness ...


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As you've discovered, an insulated attic doesn't really provide much comfort, even if it does reduce heat flow by some amount. In order to get true second-floor comfort with insulation, you need to really, really improve the amount to R-60 or greater, and you need to use insulation that's opaque to infrared radiation, which fiberglass is not. I suggest ...


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No likely permanent danger, the effect is most likely limited to the acute irritation you are experiencing. Even if it contained some amount of a hazardous substance, a short term exposure is not likely to pose a long term health issue. Now if it happened to you every day during the course of your work, that would be a different story.


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I install these systems in homes all over East Tennessee. I am not a franchise so I don't sell a one size fits all solution for crawlspaces, each is different. The idea of exchanging air from the crawlspace and the house to me has never been one I am crazy about because I have spent so much time in crawlspaces and know what is down there. Intermingling ...


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If your home is older than 1980 (was officially banned in 1977 in the US), then it is very likely that there is some asbestos in the house. It was viewed as a miracle product before there were health concerns. Asbestos was in a variety of building materials including, but not excluding drywall compounds, insulation products, drywall, siding, and roofing ...


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I would start by asking your real estate agent. They may be able to give you a quick answer like "definitely not, that's fiberglass" or "maybe". It's also possible the current owners have done testing. If they have any knowledge of asbestos in the house, most (all?) states require them to disclose it (although it may be hard to enforce that). However if ...


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Thermax is rated for fire exposure and those particular boards are intended for interior finished space, so yes, you can paint the boards instead of covering them in drywall. However, I'm not sure the result will be very aesthetically pleasing or durable if this is going to be a finished residential space, which, based on your previous question, I'm guessing ...


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Oh what a shame you already did the roof. That would have been a perfect opportunity to add rigid foam insulation boards above the roof sheathing. A vented roof is definitely better from the perspective of shingle life and moisture resistance, but with such shallow rafters and an unwillingness to lose any ceiling height, that's not an option. If you go with ...



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