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This is not a DIY job. Mold can spread everywhere in a wood-framed house full of drywall. Call in the pros to estimate the source and extent of the infection. Simply killing the mold won't help if you don't find the moisture source that made it moldy in the first place. PSA to the world: stop building houses out of wood and drywall. Sheesh, what awful ...


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It's becoming code in a lot of places to vent your crawl space. Pretty much everywhere if you live in a flood plain in order to get insurance. Whether flood plain or not, many areas are requiring them for everything new. Vented helps to prevent both mold and buildup of gasses like radon in your house. You can get vents which open and close according to the ...


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As with any answer, you should check your local codes. However, Going with R-30 on top and R-13 on the sides is standard and will give you very good value. If you can, you should plan on putting R-30 into the 'diagonals' too, that is, where the rafters are above the knee-walls but below the ceilings. If you don't have enough room now, you can screw some 2x4s ...


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Air Tight recessed lights might prevent air seepage from a conditioned area to a non-conditioned area, but they can't do much about thermal transfer. Proper insulation is the only way to fix large amount of thermal leakage. However, your predicament is going to be that your fixtures are not insulation-contact (IC) rated. With non-IC fixtures, you'll not ...


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Since it will be a conditioned space you will want to use as much insulation as possible to increase the R- value. If you intend to cover each bay (space between rafters) with drywall it would be wise to leave at least a 1 inch space between the bottom of the roof planks and the insulation to allow water vapor from the inside a way to dissipate to the ...


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This is an interesting problem. I'm wondering if you can bury your water supply line so that it would be unaffected by the frozen ground temperature? (Think below perma-frost and ground heave). Also, if the water is being piped a short distance from building that is already being heated maybe an auto draining valve (as @Ecnerwal mentioned) could be installed ...


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You need a "frost-proof hydrant" (which will have a garden hose thread, not a fire hose thread.) That is a valve that is buried below frost line. On the hose side of the valve, there is a small, deliberate leak (this should not leak when the valve is open.) When the valve is closed, the leak drains water from the standing part of the pipe. Without heat, ...


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In theory, that's fine. However, 1/2" is nowhere near enough insulation, and may actually create more problems than it solves, especially if you live in a cold area and your wall studs are deeper than 2x4. Thin foam like what you're proposing can cause wintertime condensation on the inside of whatever's right behind it. I would recommend at least a full ...


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I think you've hit on the easiest solution. Putting in a layer of insulation board and then boarding over the top of that is the approach I'd take. If you don't want to use the door then you can just put insulation right to the frame and board over that to hide the door completely. However, if you want to be able to use the door then you'd have to leave ...



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