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9

Tightening the transparent plastic is mainly for cosmetic reasons. As long as the tape stays in place, the plastic will do its job of preventing air flow. If the kit is exposed to buffeting winds strong enough to snap the plastic sheet back and forth, it could tear or pull off the tape. So you want it to be as tight as possible. In general most people find ...


7

The hairdryer step is for two reasons: To prevent noise in drafty situations, and to improve visibility and aesthetics. If you can live without either of those, it'll work just fine. One possible solution to your pull-away problem would be to apply the double-stick tape to the outside face of the window trim (perpendicular to the wall surface).


3

Based on your picture and your description, you have what is known as a cathedral ceiling. The "1-2 feet of space" you mention leads me to believe that it's built with parallel chord trusses rather than solid rafters. Can you post a picture? Regardless, like most cathedral ceilings, yours seems to be insulated insufficiently and built incorrectly (ridge ...


3

Rigid foam insulation will be the easiest to install, since you can simply screw it on. The blue or pink stuff should be fine, and they are easier to handle than Poly-Iso (yellow with a foil backing). You should pick up a pack of insulation washers, often sold for duct insulation, at your home center or on amazon. These are essentially large domed plastic ...


3

This is done all the time by insulation contractors. The technique is to drill a series of holes at the top of the wall. They next use a commercial 'blower' that forces insulation into the walls bay. It is a very non-invasive form of insulating because (as you asked) it doesn't necessitate the demolition of existing walls. It is also well with-in a competent ...


2

It's not hype, but it's not a commercial viability for home insulation at this time. I was just looking at the prices for aerogel and it's really expensive. It seems that the current use in house insulation is as a wrap. And from the prices I saw, it was $26 per square foot for 2mm thick material. Premium fiberglass is about $0.50 per square foot (2"x6" ...


1

I would insulate it unless the cost is exorbitant. As you have discovered, it is basically impossible to heat an uninsulated structure with just a little space heater. Also if you are going to be keeping cars in the garage as well, having an insulated garage will keep it warmer even if you don't heat it. My garage is insulated but unheated and it is ...


1

I'll give another answer from my own experience.. We did 2 layers with the first layer underneath being bubble wrap. I have an unfinished basement with two old single pane windows. They simply had a curtain over them, but were still losing a lot of heat. I saw this idea online and it seems to work great for us and provides an easy and cheap secondary layer. ...


1

There are, as always, tradeoffs. First, 1 inch is more than is generally considered ideal - 1/2" or so is preferred as it's less prone to internal convection currents. Yes, plastic window film kits are often installed with considerably larger spacing, but they are also commonly installed on less than ideal windows where they stop actual drafts... Any ...


1

Ice forms in that location because 1) heat is lost where the two panes of glass are connected by the metal frame, and 2) cold air sinks to the bottom of the window opening. I don't see any red flags that indicate air leakage or other serious issues. The fact that the entire glass pane frosts up at times reinforces that position. You have simple heat ...


1

Plastic isn't recommended in this situation because it would create a second vapor barrier that can trap moisture and result in condensation and mold. Craft paper would have the same problem, this is what is most likely on the other side of the insulation for the vapor barrier you want. The good solution for this is a house wrap material (often referred to ...


1

It's called HDPS (high density polystyrene) Most commonly used in decking. Some is a direct replacement for wood, and yes it is expensive. But your deck will last much longer without maintainance. It comes in different densities and the lighter the greater the r value, but the lower the strength. Unfortunatly there are pretenders in the market place. HDPS ...


1

I find the best bet is the shrink wrap plastic kits, because on a sunny day the warmth from the sun is way more efficient than simply keeping cold air out (which the plastic does anyway). Unless of course the window is facing north, then the sun won't benefit you but you will still stop the draft from coming in. I installed them throughout my house and it ...



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