Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The earth is a good insulator itself relative to cold air that may circulate outside a crawl space. The temp of the ground even few feet down is much warmer (or, in the summer, colder) and more stable than the outside air. If the air outside is in the 20s, the soil even a few feet down is much warmer (in climes as far south as yours). Ground source heat ...


4

If you wish to preserve the brick exterior, you have the following options, depending on the wall construction: If you have a structural brick wall (e.g. multiple-wythe brick or brick veneer on block) then you will have to insulate the wall from the inside. This will entail applying rigid insulation board--either foam or mineral wool--over the inside of ...


3

Whether or not you want it has nothing to do with siding. It makes no difference to the siding. The point of housewrap (brand-neutral) is that it is vapor-permeable air-barrier - as such it can reduce drafts and air movement, and thus potentially reduce your heating and/or cooling costs.


3

I am from the Midwest and my crew and I have done green work in a number of historical home in the area. Some of my thoughts on your situation: Don't ever put stuff in your walls through holes. I don't care what kind of sales pitch you are given, don't. My standard reaction would be, "How do you prove your installation, what r-value are you giving me, I ...


2

The issue here isn't how well to insulate your basement but it is how to insulate it without trapping water in your walls. If you double insulated your entire basement you are basically trapping water in your walls Building Science report covers this well. Water can also sit in fiberglass for a long time - it doesn't dry out fast. I'm not even proposing ...


2

Foam insulation can be injected into the stud cavities. A contractor will drill one hole in each stud cavity to inject the foam through. Then you can patch the holes and paint over them. You should also check any windows in the room. Look specifically at the caulking around the frame. If it's old and dry/cracked, remove the old caulk, use window/door ...


2

I am sorry but this sounds like horrible advice. Rigid or spray foam should not be used in large attics unless you just have money to burn. For your $ fiberglass blown in insulation is perfect for your installation plus plywood. (Fiberglass over cellulose since insects may love the coziness of the "wood boxes"). Also in large attics you ONLY insulate ...


1

The baffles should go in between the rafters against the inside of the roof boards. They should extend from the lower soffit end, centered between the rafters, as far up as you expect the insulation to fill in. Your description about the existing fiberglass insulation batts seems to imply that these are installed between the attic rafters. If that is ...


1

Backer rod and sealant can fill the joint. Provided the installation prevents bulk water infiltration, it provides an additional layer of protection. If the joint currently allows the passage of water, this is a stopgap versus reinstalling the windows properly.


1

Most blue tarps are usually some kind of coated fiber construction and first, I would question how vapor impermeable it really is, and second I think it would not be nearly as resilient and repairable as poly. Once the tarp material starts to break down and/or tear, it seems to be impossible to repair in my experience. Admittedly, that has always been in ...


1

In my experience as a Home performance contractor, situations like you describe are almost always a problem of air sealing. There is likely something about the way the room was constructed that allows more air infiltration. Possible causes would be an attic stairs located in the room, one of the exterior walls having an overhang, the room is connected to a ...


1

Have you considered having a home energy audit? Since all homes are slightly different, an energy audit would point out where your house is losing the most energy. Once you know where you're losing energy, you can address those areas first. Without knowing where you're losing energy, you're just stabbing in the dark.


1

You're on the right track with sprayed foam in the walls, but you're right that it's very expensive. It's also highly flammable and makes a small number of people terribly ill, rendering their homes uninhabitable. A better alternative: dense-packed cellulose blown into the empty cavities. It'll be a lot cheaper, less risky, and you should notice the impact ...


1

Building wrap is used as an infiltration barrier. Before materials like Tyvek were widely available, tar paper was used as appears to be the case with your home. Materials like Tyvek superseded tar paper because their lighter weight allows wider rolls and thus more efficient installation. But tar paper is fine. As with building wrap, proper installation is ...


1

Being that you are on the upper east coast, I would say yes if you do not currently have a house wrap. This will decrease moisture/air issues and is a good bang for your buck. I also agree with Ecnerwal - the siding is its own thing - you really need both. If the siding company tells you that you don't need it then it is possible that they believe you ...


1

Your two options are going to be insulation batting or spray foam. Batting is cheap, easy enough to do as a DIYer and will easily come in under your price tag. The other spray foam is more expensive and typically requires professional install. There is a DIYer kit out there but I have never used them. Professional install you are looking at way over ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible