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14

Um...in a word...ABSOLUTELY NOT!! You should without a doubt get the proper replacement insulation and put it back same as it came from the factory.


7

The earth is a good insulator itself relative to cold air that may circulate outside a crawl space. The temp of the ground even few feet down is much warmer (or, in the summer, colder) and more stable than the outside air. If the air outside is in the 20s, the soil even a few feet down is much warmer (in climes as far south as yours). Ground source heat ...


4

If you wish to preserve the brick exterior, you have the following options, depending on the wall construction: If you have a structural brick wall (e.g. multiple-wythe brick or brick veneer on block) then you will have to insulate the wall from the inside. This will entail applying rigid insulation board--either foam or mineral wool--over the inside of ...


2

An outside mount with no sill would at least give you a drip edge there. It's just installation step one: rest on sill. So be careful trying to mount an exterior one. For an inside mount, remove and measure the screen. Have them replicated as storms and hold them in with clips to promote annual use. Caulk it shut if you must. And the rest of your trim while ...


2

You are in the same climate zone as me. Your walls do not have to be insulated from top to bottom according to building science reports (please read their definition of basement which is totally below grade). They only suggest floor to ceiling insulation in our region given spray foam or rigid foam - in "typical" home basements. What I have been doing ...


2

Blown-in cellulose insulation is fluffy stuff. It doesn't harden. You can shovel it out of the way if you need to work in the attic; you just need to redistribute it evenly back into place when you're done. So it makes working in that space something of a nuisance, but not worse than that. (Assuming a traditional attic. If yours is a low-roof crawlspace, ...


2

You are correct. The field of building science is gradually moving away from friendliness toward vapor barriers in exterior walls, and you certainly should not put one in an interior wall or floor. Not a great idea. In addition, it would make more sense to use batt or spray foam insulation between the floor joists as opposed to cutting rigid foam to fit in ...


2

The issue here isn't how well to insulate your basement but it is how to insulate it without trapping water in your walls. If you double insulated your entire basement you are basically trapping water in your walls Building Science report covers this well. Water can also sit in fiberglass for a long time - it doesn't dry out fast. I'm not even proposing ...


2

Foam insulation can be injected into the stud cavities. A contractor will drill one hole in each stud cavity to inject the foam through. Then you can patch the holes and paint over them. You should also check any windows in the room. Look specifically at the caulking around the frame. If it's old and dry/cracked, remove the old caulk, use window/door ...


1

Backer rod and sealant can fill the joint. Provided the installation prevents bulk water infiltration, it provides an additional layer of protection. If the joint currently allows the passage of water, this is a stopgap versus reinstalling the windows properly.


1

Your two options are going to be insulation batting or spray foam. Batting is cheap, easy enough to do as a DIYer and will easily come in under your price tag. The other spray foam is more expensive and typically requires professional install. There is a DIYer kit out there but I have never used them. Professional install you are looking at way over ...


1

You are correct: this is a situation where you want no vapor barrier at all, not even the insulation. However, your better bet may working with the plumbing, so you don't need a heater, don't pay for that electricity, and don't need to worry about power outages. I assume when you said "rubber pipes" you meant plastic like PEX, but even then you face the ...


1

First with the wiring... I would try to get most or all of your electrical work done before doing the blow in. I am currently waiting in my attic until I finish my 1st floor pot lights. When you are up in an attic and wires are criss-crossing going everywhere it is really hard to pin down what is what and even find the same line 30 feet away. Add in ...


1

Is it safe? No for a few reasons: Chance of surrounding objects to catch fire (if not they will be damaged). Food not getting cooked properly (oven may not be able to achieve desired temp). You suffer from constant heat exposure. Your wallet will kill you (if the above doesn't do you in first). The insulation is there for 2 reasons: Keep the heat in ...



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