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0

If you are experiencing large pressure changes as the temperature rises and falls, then the culprit could be the expansion vessel. This is designed to expand like a balloon, when the temperature of the system increases and thus reduces the increase in pressure that would otherwise result.


0

I feel your pain. The simple truth is that having a degree in Electrical Engineering is actually a detriment in this case. The NEC, and permits and inspections are a part of civilization. In engineering speak, most of the NEC is orthogonal to electronics. The NEC prevents electrical anarchy. That's all it is for and that's what it does. Anarchy in ...


3

The normal rule in the USA is: You can work on your own home without an electrician's licence, but you can't hire yourself out to others. Permit requirements don't change. So sketch out what you want to do and take it down to your local building authority. The permit may take some time to get, but won't be expensive compared to your salary. Given that ...


-3

It's your house, do what you want. This isn't England/Soviet Russia/Germany (yet). You should see the "professional" electrical work in my house. Octopuses, bare wires on insulators, nails and romex. Every time I do anything I reduce the chance of a fire by 10%.


-3

I wouldn't call the building department. I'd call your neighbor. Find out what the locals do. You can do what you want in your own house. Something as simple as a couple lights and a switch should be done before you've finished reading this post.


9

Contact your local building department, and ask them if this would require a permit, and if you can do the work yourself. That's the only way to know for sure, as different areas have different rules. You'll likely have to pay a small fee for the permit, and have the work inspected at different stages of the job (or maybe only once it's done). Most areas ...


1

Can you do it: yes. Will it come back to bite you: probably yes. Trapping wood between two cement building layers, in my opinion is asking for problems. If there is any moisture wicking through that cement slab it will be trapped beneath your tile in the wood - Do the work and scrape that floor. I have spent days scraping a floor to prep for tile ...


-1

Don't cut the brick. It will never look OK. Leave a gap and use molding to cover the gap.


1

I think what you have are similar to these, sleeve and taper nut anchor bolts: source If you're real lucky, the nuts are still properly positioned and you can screw bolts back into them. I wouldn't bother though, my preferred masonry screws are Tapcons. I thought this question was going to be about lead wedge anchors, which if not totally deformed, you ...


2

As Alan Ward says, it depends on your local jurisdiction. In the UK, for example, it would be perfectly legal as long as it is on their land - in fact it is quite common in certain circumstances, for example if someone lives next to an industrial unit with a big metal security fence, they might put up a nicer-looking wooden one to hide the unsightly metal ...


0

Don't let him install your unit. Yes, you should pump the unit with dry nitrogen to check for leaks, then evacuate the system with a two stage pump.


0

Obviously starting and ending with a full plank is ideal, however, it almost never works out that way. You'll want to avoid installing skinny little pieces of a plank (less than half a plank), so you'll have to make some calculations up front. Measure the distance from wall A to wall D, then based on the width of your planks determine how many rows you'll ...


0

Run it lengthwise down the hall and the same direction in the living room at the end. That way you can do it without using a transition between the two. Rooms that are seperated by a door can be run any direction because you'll used a transiton there. As to the the recommendation of running it paralelle to window or light source, I ignored that because mine ...



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