Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

26

Pretty easy DIY job. All you'll need is: a hammer, old metal putty knife, utility knife, small pry bar, pliers, and a pencil. For reinstallation, a finish nail gun really makes the job go fast, and a nail set is also useful. The typical procedure: Cut away any caulk on the top edge and corners. Check any inside corners to see if they are coped rather than ...


19

Drywall should definitely not touch concrete as moisture will wick (ie flow up the surface as in a candle/lamp wick) into the drywall and encourage mold growth. 3/8" should be sufficient - your prop up plan is not only appropriate, but a common technique used by drywallers.


19

Yes, reversing them would be a bad thing. The cold water should be entering the bottom of the tank, the hot output at the top: I'd insist that the plumber fix this. But if they won't, I'd suggest picking up a pipe cutter, some sharkbite connectors, and just fix it yourself. Shouldn't take more than a half hour to do so.


16

I would cut the bottom of the trim so the tile can slide underneath. Then you only need to approximate the shape of the tile, but you don't have to worry about perfect edges. I've used the Dremel Multi-Max with the 3/4" flush cut blade to cut base trim and door jambs so I could slide hardwood flooring underneath. I borrowed a friend's and decided I needed ...


15

First, let me state that I am NOT a fan of laminate flooring. Laminate flooring comes in a wide variety of quality levels, from extremely poor to fairly good, but share a common trait. They are always a "picture" of wood on some pressed paper or synthetic backing. They can be miserable to work with, easily damaged and almost impossible to repair after ...


14

I start by hand tightening as much as I can, then I tighten a little on each side and check if the toilet moves. If it does then I tighten a bit more, check and repeat until there's no movement. You're trying to avoid bowl movement, so that it doesn't shift or fall over, not to hold the floor up by the toilet bolts. As tight as you can go will probably ...


14

1/2" give or take is fine, just be sure there's no direct contact that can wick up moisture. The trim will cover any gaps, so it's not critical that these are even. Note that drywall on the wall should support the ceiling drywall, meaning you install the ceiling first, and the wall is installed tight against the ceiling. For the bottom piece, you use a roll ...


13

It's totally normal. Carpet comes on rolls in widths from 11'6" to 13'. They need to cut off a chunk of that roll to fit the room. It's the reason why if you're carpeting a 10x10' room, you can't buy 100sqft of carpet: they'll charge you for more like 120sqft (12' roll, 10' long). It also depends on the layout of the room, and where they put seams (if ...


12

OK here we go. First of all, the most common reasons for squeaky hardwood floors are age and installation over uneven subfloors, where any movement of wood on wood makes the sounds. Age becomes a factor when the subfloor ages, shrinks a bit making the nails holding the hardwood a bit loose. Adding either a layer of felt or rosin paper isolates the wood ...


11

Probably you have two or more phone jacks daisy-chained together. One cable goes to wherever the phone line enters the house and the other runs to another phone jack somewhere else in the house. This is a common practice. I did some pricing online, and it seems that Cat 5e is comparable in price to 4-conductor phone cable, so the builders may simply have ...


10

You can mount them vertically, but they have to be installed 4-12 inches (spacing usually on the instructions) from the ceiling. So it might be better to put in on the column than the beam, depending on how large that beam is. More information from FEMA


10

First, sit on your couch in the ideal viewing position (ie: where your butt imprint is). The bottom 1/3 of the TV should be at eye level when mounted. Everyone has an opinion about exact positioning, but this is more or less the general rule of thumb I've found from various sources, and it has always worked well for me. I find most people mount them too ...


10

I would build a 2x4 (or 2x6, it's hard to tell the depth from this picture) frame to fit into the cubby hole, something like this: Spacing and attaching Space the studs 16" on center. You'll need to attach this securely to the rest of the walls. Assuming they're also wood, a few 3" #10 screws into either side would probably do the trick. Be sure to ...


9

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet, but I've always heard it is better to install laminate flooring perpendicular to the floor joists in the room. Often the subfloor can be slightly unlevel due to high points running along the joists and low points halfway between the joists. If your laminate flooring is parallel to the joists, it will simply follow ...


9

I found it took me a couple hundred hours of applying mud to get to the point where I knew exactly how I wanted it to look. I learned just fine by starting with the pre-mixed straight out of the bucket and slapping it on the wall. You'll quickly notice the difference in application ("spreadability") when it starts to dry in your mud pan a little bit. Then ...


9

reasons going to the service entrance will be difficult: you'll have to open the meter box, and most meter boxes are tamper sealed by the electric company so you will have to involve them. the meter box lugs are probably not sized for multiple connections. this creates a potentially dangerous wiring setup. someone may assume that the main panel in the ...


9

Now you've learned the hard way, the same way the rest of us learned, why they say "measure twice." A spade bit may work for this trick, but an auger bit may be easier to control. First, use the bit to cut a hole in center of some scrap wood. A piece of plywood that's 4"x6" would work well, and a 2x4 that's 6-8" long would also work. You need a few inches ...


8

I'd agree with @aphoria about just cutting back the trim (unless this is a temporary job, as you're not going to be able to extend it later if the floor gets lowered). ... but I wouldn't use a dovetail saw. Yes, the fine teeth will minimize tearing, but the handle placement and rigid spine make it much more difficult to get a horizontal cut. Instead, try ...


8

Electrical code requires that all junctions be accessible in a box, so you definitely need one here. You have two choices (that I know of at least): cut a large hole in your siding and mount a retrofit light box into the wall cavity. drill a small hole in your siding and mount one a weatherproof box on the outside: The exterior boxes come in a ...


7

The weak points in any guttering system are where the various sections join. If the gutters aren't fitted correctly then any system will leak. So look for a system that has an easy to fit joint, or perhaps one where the joints are bonded. As long as they have the capacity to carry the volume of water you expect then any correctly installed system will be ...


7

Particle board or some form of fiber board or plywood will eliminate the issues you might have with solid wood warping. If you veneer the top surface, you should veneer the bottom as well to avoid the veneer warping the board if it shrinks or expands on only one surface. Remember to treat the top and bottom the same (varnish, oil, or other). Another thing ...


7

Cutting the countertop to length: Try making a custom circular saw jig to cut your countertop to size. 3/4" plywood placed together at right angles with a cleat for guiding your saw should give you a straight cut. Assemble the jig with extra material, then cut it to size with your saw for a perfect fit. Use a saw blade with a high tooth count and cut the ...


7

They're billing you for their actual materials cost this way. It's not a made-up number. In the end, though, the final price is what matters, not how they come up with it. Get more than one estimate. Prices of work on your house vary widely, as does quality of work, and the two are not always linked.


7

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


7

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


7

Looks to me like you have a GALANT leg. From IKEA's website The legs shall be fitted on to the frame before the table top is put in place. If you only have the table and legs, you may not have everything you need. Based on instructions found at the customer service site linked to by alt, you need to put the legs onto the frame bar piece, then put the ...


6

The instructions for the last type of laminate flooring I installed actually recommended not selecting the direction based on the longer dimenension of the room, but based on how much light is coming in from each wall, and to select it so the planks ran perpendicular to the wall with the most light. If you're going to break the floor and rotate it at the ...


6

A small flat-head electrician's screwdriver should do the trick. The release mechanism is spring-loaded, so with the wire in place, pushes it to one side. Angle the screwdriver slightly and you should be able to disengage it.


6

The only info you need to order a new door is the actual door measurement. 36"X81" for example. The term rough opening refers to the actual stud frame opening which you cannot see or measure with the existing door jams and trim installed. If you are concerned if your rough opening is large enough, you will need to remove the interior trim to see exactly ...


6

You could build a wood frame that fits in the window with an interior hole large enough to accommodate the AC unit. This also has the advantage that you won't have to hold the window open, while juggling the unit into place. You can install the light weight frame, then slide the unit into place. I built one when I lived on the second floor of an apartment ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible