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0

You had (maybe sub-optimal) working air, so the holes (unless new) are probably not the primary cause. I imagine your evaporator coil (the coil inside the interior air handling unit) has frozen over. This typically happens when the airflow over it is restricted, but it can happen when the refrigerant has leaked out of the system. Air restriction prevents ...


2

If you're willing to blur the line between homeowner and HVAC tech, sure. If this is a split system, hooking up the linesets, purging the lines with compressed nitrogen, pumping it down, measuring the vacuum, adjusting the charge, and ensuring that the system is leak-free are all likely to be the most challenging parts. These tasks require specialized tools ...


0

As Tester101 has already answered in the comments, yes you can clean the condenser with the hose. Unless the fin stock is in very bad shape, you should be fine to spray it down with water--you can even safely spray it while the unit is running, provided it was wired correctly. You can test the condenser fins by gently running your fingernail along the fins: ...


1

That's correct. If you're installing a 240 volt load, there's no need for the grounded (neutral) conductor. As you suggest, you will need a grounding conductor though.


2

The HVAC guy has a hammer, and your problem looks like a nail. More ducts! Bigger equipment! Wrong. Your problem is easy to diagnose: this room's ceiling is terribly under-insulated. When people convert attics into rooms, they almost always (like 99% of the time) insulate the ceiling incorrectly and insufficiently. You need a lot more insulation; the lack of ...


1

I have a 240v 30amp welder wired in the way you described. Hot, Hot, Ground. Be sure to use the correct 2 pole breaker.


0

It looks like there's an unused blue wire in the cable. Just hook that up at both ends to the C terminals, and make sure you connect them together at the splice. You might have to use a twist-on wire connector and a bit of scrap wire, to extend the cut off blue wire to reach the terminals.


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Because of the time frame you mention, I would suspect that humidity and condensation is exceeding the amount of airflow through your evaporator coils. Check that your filter is not too dirty or restricting airflow, and replace it every 30-90 days depending on the suggested replacement listed on the filter. Airflow could also be restricted by clogged ...


0

It sounds to me like the 'return vents' are actually exhaust vents from the heater. My attic heater has a return duct directly below the heater at floor level in the living room. The filter is in front of this return duct (20" X 30" filter). There should be a rather large flange on the bottom or side of your heater for the return duct to attach. It ...


0

If your domestic hot water tank does not have a separate burner, and isn't electric, then that's why the furnace is turning on: to heat up your hot water tank.


1

As it turns out, the box in the last picture is a safety measure which cuts the electricity when the panel door is removed. Turns out, there were a couple of screws on the outside that secure this box that were missing. Why? I did it (DOH!). I removed them a few days back when trying to open this panel door so that I can do the "G wire to C wire" switch for ...


1

Get rid of the external transformer, and pull a proper C wire. It's not working because you have one side of the contactor coil connected to one transformer, and the other side connected to another transformer. There's not a complete circuit. When the thermostat is calling for cool, your circuit looks like this If you follow the circuit, you can see ...


0

Had same problem this winter, heat man installed vent in plentium to blow on drain pipe. Installed T joint above drain end so if freeze occurs it would drain in crawl space.seems to have worked well !!Open or close vent as needed.


-1

The C wire is most likely not causing a problem if you are able to get it to work in heat mode. All the C wire does is provide power - and you wouldn't' have been able to run the heat all winter if you had a power problem to the thermostat. So the problem results from the way the AC functionality is hooked up. Many air conditioning units have a circuit ...


1

It could be a variety of things, but there's no way to be sure without troubleshooting the system. Thermostat It could be that the thermostat isn't signalling the A/C unit to start. Things to check The indoor blower comes on The outdoor unit turns on There's voltage on the A/C signal wire from the thermostat Control board The control board in the ...


2

The lack of insulation on the ducts in the floor is of no concern as the floor is in the conditioned space (ie, the area around the ducts is supposed to be cooled.) If the ducts were in the attic that would be a BIG deal. The very low insulation in the attic seems like both a contributing problem, and the most easily solved one. Either rent a blower and buy ...


1

Condensing furnaces are designed to be installed ONLY IN A CONDITIONED SPACE. Whoever installed one in an attic might need to get qualified to do heating work. Get the specific manual for the unit and see if there was something special that was supposed to be done to allow for that unit to be installed where it was subject to freezing temps. Again, the ...


0

One day several years ago it was 118° here, and our A/C couldn't get the house any cooler than 87°. Eventually I discovered there wasn't enough aluminum tape around the return air duct, so I was just blowing a lot of cool air into the attic. Taping it up solved the problem. I don't know if that even applies in your case, but if so, it's worth a look.


3

There is some additional easy trouble-shooting you can do yourself. Check temperature at the vents: Get a little thermometer. Put it right on or just inside one of the air vents so that it's getting the full effect of the air temp coming out of the vents. The air should be about 20 degrees cooler than ambient in your house. So, if your house is 75, the air ...


3

If you have a set of gauges, you should connect them at the condensing unit and measure the pressures in the refrigerant lines. If you don't have a set of gauges, you should contact somebody who does. Troubleshooting and repairing A/C units requires special tools, without them you can only speculate as to what the problem is. If I had to speculate, I'd ...


0

I found the solution by playing with it. On the new thermostat, remove the blue and grey wires, as they are just relays to the temperature sensor. Black goes to C, and link E and AUX. In the thermostat settings, go to option 170 and change it to option 2 for heat-pump settings. This process did the trick for me.


0

Before investing in active elements (electrical pumps), why not try out a passive installation? Simply building a second roof above the first -leaving an air-gap between the two- will help reduce incoming heat. The higher roof doesn't even need to be very strong, since it only has to handle its own weight (and perhaps also some wind). This used to be a ...


2

Won't work. The insulation is sufficient to reduce the heat loss from your apartment at 25c to the snow or ice at -15c to a reasonably low value. Misters or evaporative coolers only reduce the temperature by a few degrees C, and most of the heat absorbed would come from the surrounding air, not your house. I'd suggest awnings over the windows, ...


-1

I put brand new Panasonic batteries in my thermostat and it did nothing. However, it worked with the old batteries, one of which was Energizer, and the other was Duracell. Clearly it takes a stronger battery.


0

Not really. Historically, registers and radiators have been by windows since in cold climates, they're the biggest sources of heat loss and discomfort. With the advent of Low-E double and triple pane windows, this concern is greatly diminished. That said, unless there's a problem with your ductwork, I don't see any advantage to moving the ducts.


1

This is one possibility, from my distant past... In a house with hot-water heating that I lived in as a teen, the boiler and hot-water heating were controlled in a different way: Whenever the water in the boiler dropped below a certain temperature, the burner came on and heated the water in the boiler jacket. This would go on as long as the system was ...


0

Your original wiring looked like this, where the top circles represent the thermostat terminals and the bottom the furnace. To properly pull off the "G wire trick", you have to locate the transformer in the furnace. You then have to determine which leg feeds R, and which does not. The leg that does not feed R, will be where you connect your new C wire. ...


3

A/C Refrigerant Line Set Those are the refrigerant lines (what I would call Freon lines) that feed the condenser (the thing outside; half of a split system. The other half is the coil inside your furnace's plenum chamber). The big one (cold) is the suction line. The small one is the liquid line (hot; no need for insulation). Both of these lines run all ...


0

The wire that is connected to the Y wire, and runs out to the condensing unit, should be in a cable with another wire. That other wire should attach to the "common" side of the transformer. Find that wire, and attach your new C wire to it.


0

E is usually emergency heat. In systems that don't actually have emergency heat but a user might select that mode on the thermostat, connecting E to W will cause the normal heat to come on instead of doing nothing.



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