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You should check the wiring in the furnace. There are no standards for thermostat wire colors, so you can't always trust the color of the wires. Seeing how the wires connect to the furnace, is a sure fire way to figure out what's what. The O (cool mode) and B (heat mode) terminals are usually used for a reversing valve, in heat pump systems. I'm not ...


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We found an HVAC guy to build it from photos and measurements. With a bit of nudging, it went in after I cut the right whole in the box.


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Check your drain lines for water run off. Make sure they are clear and then check the float for the excess water shut down reset them


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We had the same problem in our house, and we've simply lived with it - having had HVAC companies come out and inspect or evaluate it. They all said the system was in good working order, and was appropriately sized for our house. This year we replaced 3 windows and a doorwall in the first floor of the house, and suddenly we can not only maintain a ...


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Is there a small switch somewhere n the thermostat that says something like "fan" and has positions for "auto" and "on"? Is it in the "On" position? If what you mean is that the fan keeps blowing when the thermostat is not calling for cooling (but the air at that point is not being cooled) that could be it. Otherwise, look for a short circuit in the ...


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The hot attic has more latent heat (water vapor) due to both it's higher temperature and being vented to the outside. As that air mixes with the cooler interior air, relative humidity rises. When the more humid air hits the cold uninsulated duct, it condenses. The first step is to seal the opening between the attic and the interior space to reduce ...


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If the lines are the same temperature, that means they're at the same pressure. Which is normal when the system is not running. Once the system starts, the pressure in one line should go up, while the other goes down. Since the pressures in your system are basically equal, I'd say the refrigerant is low. You can verify this be connecting a set of gages ...


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You are correct the refrigerant is not a consumable. If a system is low on refrigerant, then it has a leak. The technician should have a "sniffer" tool that can detect refrigerant leaks. If they didn't use it last time, then they were irresponsible. Also, refrigerant is expensive so that attitude of "if it gets low again then we know you have a leak" is ...


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Another solution -- the one used in my house for both the condensing furnace and the dehumidifier -- is to run the drainage into what amounts to a small sump pump, so the water can be sent through a hose up to ceiling level, across the room, and then down into the drain.


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I think I'd suggest looking for alternatives which don't involve that window well. Perhaps a ducted A/C would let you install the ducts through the wall above the sill (as you would a dryer's output).


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You would be far better off building a roof type structure over the window well that is well above the window well and projects far enough out around the edges of the well that rain water does not enter the well. Trying to jury rig a scheme to keep an existing lid open "just enough" sounds like a recipe waiting for disaster. Either it will be left closed ...


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I'm imagining it's only a 1/2" pipe, in which case maybe an on-floor cord protector might work: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Legrand-Wiremold-5-ft-Over-Floor-Cord-Protector-CDBK-5/100669770 Or you could re-route the pipe around the perimeter of the room to avoid the heaviest traffic.


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Consumer Reports groups single-room A/Cs roughly into small/medium/large categories (100 to 300 square feet, 250 to 400 square feet, 350 to 650 square feet), and from what I've seen the BTU ratings and room sizes on A/C boxes in stores seem to follow the same general formula (probably they're all referencing the Energy Star calculations). Yes, one can ...


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I have a ruud rheem heat pump, I had this same issue. The unit was installed in 2006. After going through the typical steps of checking air filters and electrical components on the unit, I found the wiring from the thermostat for the blower control to the control board was rusted in the wire nut. I cut the wires and stripped them back and reconnected the ...


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I'll let someone else take a stab at helping you fix your immediate problems, but I'll take a crack at the deeper issue. From your profile, I see that you live in New York. Assuming your mother does as well, your climate is wet, but only very hot for a few months out of the year. Running a central A/C unit year-round simply to dry the air out is a gross ...


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(This is from @Harry, the original poster.) In 96 it still took 4 or more hours to drop the temp 6 degrees. Its been recharged 2 times since installed, 1 capacitor replacement. The last recharge cost $225, 2 years ago. The furnace however has had 4 controller boards, 3 temp sensors, and 2 blower motors. That is why I am looking for a replacement for both. ...


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I'm not a HVAC expert but a 5 ton unit sounds pretty large for a 3000sqft house. You can probably approach this in one of two ways. One is probably what the previous owner did and just throw more cooling capacity at the problem (two units, larger units, etc.). Alternatively, you can start looking at ways to get more out of your existing unit. Some things ...


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Use masking tape to label the conditioner's connections to the board made w red/blue wirenuts before you take them apart. A simple 1 to 4 -> left to right will keep you from swapping around by accident. It wouldn't hurt to mark one of the plugin connectors with a sharpy either.


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First, be wary of the two big capacitors. One is the large "beer-can"-shaped component against the inside wall of the enclosure, and the other is the smaller, silver oval-shaped can right next to it. These can hold electrical charge, and could hurt you. You'll want make sure that they're discharged. Once you unplug the unit, wait a few minutes for the ...


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It looks like all the wires have connectors on them, so nothing crazy like soldering will be required. Compare the old board and the new board to make sure that all of the connections have the same labels, and label all the wires accordingly. Just make sure the power to everything is turned off and go for it.


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If the system runs normally when the thermostat is calling for heat, but not when the fan control is switched to the ON position. There's a short somewhere between the thermostat and the G terminal. Looking at the documentation for the unit, there seems to be a relay on the board that controls the fan speed selection. The heat speed is connected to the ...


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How did the system perform back in '96 or at least on a good charge? Ideally someone preformed all the necessary 'manuals' and it was the correct size to use. I lived in a 1700 sf apartment that was always a little hot until we switched out a 2.5 for 3. It all depends on your heat gain: windows, drafts, insulation, lighting, appliances, humans.... If you are ...


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My A/C's frozen up before due to insufficient airflow over the evaporator coil. Turns out those $20 allergen-blocking air filters can slow down the air too much, so I switched to a cheaper one that doesn't block the air flow as much. My A/C guy also told me that running the A/C when it's cooler outside than inside can cause it to freeze up in certain ...


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If the system run normally when the thermostat is calling for heat, and when the fan control is switched to the ON position. Then the first thing I'd look at, is the contactor in the condensing unit. WARNING: If you're not comfortable opening the condensing unit, and/or working with electrical devices. PLEASE contact a licensed and insured HVAC technician. ...



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