Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Given a circular 8" duct you are dealing with an airflow area of about 50 sq/in. You currently have 72 sq/in opening. I haven't seen a picture of your register - some are not as open as others so it is hard for me to know for sure but... with 72 sq/in opening the air would just dribble out. This is fine for a floor vent that is unobstructed by walls and ...


1

I found this statement from the manufacture (Fasco) of my old and replacement part: The blower is designed to produce a certain amount of air-flow measured in CFM (cubic feet per minute). The airflow in some furnaces is needed to create a specific amount of vacuum at the vacuum tap mentioned above. If the replacement blower is not the exact one ...


-2

if u change the capacitor and does not work turn the power on use a screwdriver and try turning the fan you will notice motor making a buzzing sound and hard to turn just replace motor.I had the same problem and that took care of it.Two more things your motor may have three wire black brown and orange today motor have five wire instruction come with it ...


0

While such a thing as a wireless relay exists, it's mighty expensive compared to the simpler option, which'd be to run thermostat wire over to the transfer switch to carry the Y and switched-Y wires there, and use the existing relay contacts on the transfer switch control board.


0

Thanks Tester - awesome explanation! The animated "pacman circuit" picture in your other post helped me understand the purpose of a C wire in modern thermostats. More so than other non-animated pictures some have posted. I had actually emailed Honeywell support to ask them what size external 24VAC transformer they recommend. They recommended a 40VA, but ...


1

R in general R, Rh, and Rc are all the same, but not. In general terms, the R terminal is where you connect the signal voltage source. In low voltage controlled systems, there will be a step down transformer that provides the power to the control circuitry. One of the legs from the secondary of the transformer will be connected to the R terminal, which ...


1

You want your vent venting to air as much as possible. If you are cooling/heating your walls/floors/ceiling this is much more inefficient than doing the same to the room. Think about it this way... Let's say 25% of the heat is absorbed by the wall. Do you think the wall will heat up the room to reflect that 25%? Maybe reflecting 1/5 of that if that. ...


1

What a great question. I love questions that hit the sweet spot between a textbook, and the real world. Textbook Physics says that you save energy by pointing the vent to blow to the room. Real world physics says that blowing toward you better when the A/C is on, and to the wall when heating. Personal preference is, of course, a personal decision. In ...


0

Thermostat works Program setting turns heat off Program setting tries to start furnace Furnace runs for 45 seconds Furnace shuts off - trips breaker behind the panel. Reset breaker - System runs fine. Last time this happened, the repair guy took the shotgun approach and replaced almost everything. So rather than knowing exactly what broke, we know ...


1

I will give this a try. Physics says that water can not make steam, at sea level pressure under 212 degrees F. It is also why steam pipes and automobile systems are under pressure, you can hold more heat, when water is under pressure and not have it boil. Pressure cookers cook food faster for the same reason. The only way to make steam, from water, at ...


1

This first thing to try is removing the thermostat and shorting the R and G wires. Usually, these are the red and green wires. This should start up the fan in the blower. If that works, try shorting R and Y (usually yellow). This should start up the fan in the blower, and the AC compressor. If all of this happens immediately upon shorting the wires together, ...


0

Based on the new information... It looks like the blue wire from the secondary side of the transformer is the R, which would make the yellow secondary wire C. I should have read the transformer label, that clearly says BL (Blue) is common, and yellow is 24V.


0

Land lord said nothing about a hole in the roof :) Roof vents are -really- easy to install, and look great when done properly! The directions on the box will tell you everything you need to do, but really it really is just as simple as cutting a hole in the roof, caulking, and tucking under a few shingles! If they don't go for a roof vent, you could use ...


2

Something that meets or slightly exceeds the 35 in-lb rating, and matches the 24V spec (though you could check if your system is using AC or DC, and just get one to match your system rather than an AC/DC version.) I suppose the time should fall in the general range of this one's 80-110 seconds as well, so vents are not slamming open and closed, but I ...


2

You could try having the ducts Aerosol Duct Sealed. An expensive process not intended for it's acoustical value, but I assume it would offer some. Reduce noise from forced air furnace. -More related to unit noise then from people, but you still have two basic options: baffles or insulation. Other options: move the TV so it doesn't shoot at the registers; ...


0

If the j-box has a neutral (it may or may not), you could wire up the WeMo to switch only one of the hot legs. I won't describe the details of my proposal since it involves rewiring the outlet and daisy-chaining some additional outlets and plugs, but it could be done. If this is enough info to jog your creativity, go for it. If you don't know what I'm ...


0

It's hard to say for sure one way or another without evaluating your specific circumstances, but the SEER 21 option is probably not worth it. You get diminishing returns from increasing SEER. Going from SEER 10 to SEER 16 should get you close to a 40% reduction in your cooling costs; going to SEER 21 only brings that up to about a 55% reduction. An extra ...


0

There is a new player in this industry, but they're running about $100 per device with Nest integration: https://www.ecoventsystems.com/your-system/


1

The previous person answering your question does not have a sufficient understanding of HVAC systems. For the past fifteen years, I have been working on such systems five days a week. I have learned a few things about such systems. As long as you have more than one return in your home, capping one return will not damage your system in any way. I set up ...


0

You can also buy a digital thermostat with a pass code, no one but you can change settings


0

Yes, it is just that easy. You will need a timer with a 'dry contact' or relay output. If you take power from the pump, remember it is (likely) 240 volts. Removing power from the pump will not remove power from the emergency heat strips, or from the fan. Removing power from the pump may, or may not, turn off the reserving valve (Heat mode / Cooling mode) ...


0

Your question is not long at all, much better too much information than not enough. If it were mine: Remove everything starting with the 125 amp breaker until you hit the disconnects on the HVAC stuff. 6/2 Romex - copper is good for 60 amps (NEC 240.4 (B) & 334.80 -60 degree) A couple of breakers, romex connectors and big staples Should be less ...


2

Unless I'm missing something in your explanation, using the 2/0 AL wire doesn't seem to be a problem, except that it's AL and the unit does not specify AL. What will probably be simpler than running all new wire is to just get AL-to-copper splice connectors. And in response to: if I run two separate circuits/lines, do I need to tie together to the (2) ...


1

Adapting a 120V controller for a 240V (208 is unlikely unless you have 3-phase power) plug seems remarkably foolish... Quoting wikipedia: "NEMA 6 devices, while specified as 250 V, may be used for either 208 V or 240 V circuits, generally depending on whether the building has a three-phase or split-phase power supply, respectively." To Quote Belkin, Wemo ...



Top 50 recent answers are included