New answers tagged

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HVAC Technicians must understand how to take proper measurements for Delta T and ambient temperatures along with the Wet Bulb temperatures. With a little math You really do not have a reason to crack into the refrigerant system. The industry in my area as a whole is quite vocal about moving away from the gauge on every PM approach. It is just time for ...


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A cheap option, is hanger strap. It's available in both metal and plastic, and in various sizes.


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I like PVC strap tape. You can hang it about anywhere with about anything. It doesn't kink up like metal, and it isn't sharp.


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If you don't care how it looks, just put some screw eyes in the wall above where you want the duct work to be, and loop some wire around the duct work and attach both ends to the screw eye. Quick and easy. As an aside comment, if there is a significant difference in temperatures between the air going through the duct work and the air outside, you may ...


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I had a furnace guy come in the morning. He saw the furnace and said "Oh my god!" After two hours he decided he couldn't figure it out and they sent another guy later that day. They finally figured it out. Since a guy who works with furnaces for a living couldn't figure it out after two hours I think I never had a chance to begin with. So in the end, the ...


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If you've ever assembled a PC or have any DC electronics knowledge, the AC can make things confusing. It's educational to pretend that the transformer is a 24 volt DC supply, and that R/RC/RH is +24V, and C is GND. (not to be confused with the "equipment grounding conductor" - the bare/green wire in 120V wiring.) +24V "power" goes to the thermostat. GND ...


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I'll use this gif from my other answer, to try and describe how the system works. I'll focus only on the heating side, just to keep things simple. When the thermostat is not calling for heat, the circuit is open and electricity cannot flow. Once the temperature in the room drops below the set point, the switch in the thermostat closes. When the switch is ...


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You probably can't do it yourself, but an HVAC technician likely could. Moving the unit likely requires: Evacuating the refrigerant Reconfigure (and potentially rerun) the line sets. Reconfigure (and potentially rerun) electrical. Physically moving the unit. Charging the system back up with refrigerant. You could probably do number 4, and maybe number 2 ...


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According to Trane installation instructions, the technician is correct. They do require 3' of clear space in front of the control box. As for why the technician chose this orientation, I can only speculate. It looks to me like the access panel is on the corner of the unit, which would mean there has to be 3' clear space at the corner. Obviously the ...


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These units are designed to be outside, so there's no reason to cover it. If you're really concerned about it, go ahead and cover it. Just make sure you don't restrict the airflow, as that can impact how well the unit works. The manufacture likely recommends annual cleaning, and maintenance. Which will probably do more good for the unit than the cover.


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Yeah, you can buy covers, and check this one out, too... perfect for urban duck hunting


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The + is yellow, and the- is blue in your case (technically common, or C). The dog could have blown the fuse. There is a 3amp fuse on the furnace control board that protects the low voltage side. If you don't get anything to come one, check that fuse.


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Your dealing with low voltage AC so you don't have to be concerned with getting the + and - backwards. Assuming the yellow and blue wires connect to the coil on the contactor, you can safely connect the two wires from the house to the two wires in the outdoor unit. Prior to doing any work with the wires, verify you have 1) the power off to the furnace/air ...


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Wire colors with HVAC wiring are non-standardized, so the colors themselves don't help much. Your furance/air handler should have a control board with terminals labelled R, W, Y, G and C. There should be an existing wire that connects to all of these (though maybe not C) that goes to your thermostat. If anything is different in your setup, please update ...


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I did this, almost exactly as you have drawn (in my mothers home when I was a teenager). You will need to support the back end if you cannot support the bottom "lip" of the AC from sliding forward. In other words, the AC will have torquing-force. The reason I used a shelf for my AC was because I couldn't support the top. But since you are putting the AC ...


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Modifications to the flue are likely to be unwise and may be counterproductive or cause your heater to be dangerous or fail any safety checks. There are fairly strict back pressure requirements for proper function. Even some models from 20 years ago recaptured some of the waste heat into the incoming air (concentric balanced flue).


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It is generally not worth the time and money to try to capture the lost heat through the exhaust system of the vast majority of tankless/on-demand water heaters. The heaters are now so efficient that they can vent the exhaust through plastic (PVC) pipe. Since these heaters also only operate when there is a call for hot water, they do not run very often. ...


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Pa (Pascal) is a unit of pressure (air or hydraulic pressure). It's a very tiny unit, usually used in the thousands or millions. "inch" in this context is "inches of water", another unit of pressure. This one's easy. Get a glass of water and a clear straw. Suck on the straw just enough that the water comes up 3". Or blow hard enough it goes down 3". ...


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I had the same problem many years ago. The air handler would come on but not the outside compressor or blower motor. Every breaker and connection checked out fine. I watched the outside main contactor for the motors and noticed that the contacts were so burned away they could no longer work. I founds its part number and ordered it and replaced it. The AC has ...


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Dehumidifiers work a bit different than A/C units. While A/C units do remove moisture, as a side effect. They also cool the air moving through them, by moving heat away. Dehumidifiers remove the moisture and cool the air, but then they heat the air back up. If you wanted your A/C system to function as a dehumidifier, you'd have to bring back the heat that ...


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The compressor is in the condenser unit where the heat is removed in most cases. The evaporator is inside the air handler where the cold air is made for the house. If the cap is blown it will still try to start and normally blow the fuse. The cap can be checked out of circuit by using ohms and touching the leads you should see the value climb. Then reverse ...


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The first thing to do is check the two wires on the outside unit when the thermostat is calling for cooling. In your picture it looks like the Blue and Yellow thermostat wires are being used. You should have 24v AC across those two wires, which would normally close the 240v relay and start up the compressor and cooling fan. If you're not getting 24v on ...


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There is no doubt that a 2-stage unit will more evenly condition your space, for heating or cooling, that is what they are designed for. The full/partial compressor load capability, combined with variable fan speed commonly offered on 2-stage units, allows the unit to run for longer periods. That reduces temperature swings and would provide more even cooling ...


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Duct cleaning is IMHO a scam as mentioned in other answers, but sealing the ductwork is absolutely beneficial in terms of efficency. Air leaks are one of the leading causes of lost efficiency.


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I believe @Fiasco Labs is correct. In addition to his answer I will add that if your AC repair man says your system is low on refrigerant, but can't find any leaks, it's time for a new repair man. Refrigerant doesn't magically disappear. It's an 18 year old system so it's almost garunteed the leak is in your evaporator coil.


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Sounds like a string of bad luck. While an electrical spike/surge will cause problems and failures in the controllers and motors, the freon exists in an enclosed system and therefore this will not cause a leak. The compressor is a hermetically sealed unit, so there are no shaft seals that will cause freon loss. The refrigerator is the most likely to have ...


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A power surge will do this. I suggest to call an electrician to evaluate the circuit panel. Bad circuit breakers could also contribute to these problems.


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It depends (but likely no). IMO, duct cleaning does have it's place in today's world (pet hair/allergen reduction for example). However, it likely only needs done once every 10-15 years in most cases. Duct sealer is basically like the sealant you can put in a bicycle tube to fix a leak except that since ducts aren't a completely closed system like a tube, ...


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I agree with everything noted by Jeff. Further to this, you should consider cutting in dampers to aid in your airflow distribution - this should be a relatively easy task. Start with the rooms where you are overcooling the most and work back from there. I would note that dampers may not help with everything -you will struggle to balance the system if your ...


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no - you are being offered a great big glass of snake oil duct cleaning is already a huge scam. EPA and health canada have already for years been warning people about the risks. this is just a new twist on an already deceptive industry


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I have a furnace that is at least 3 decades old. It did not have a C wire. I picked up a 24 volt transformer and used that. SOrry I don't have the specifics but there was some info on the web about it. Just be sure everything is in code. THe transformer provided the required power for my Honeywell wifi theromostat. It's been working well for over a year. ...


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The answer will depend on how much temperature drop/rise there is inside the ducts. A two stage cooling system means that the heatpump will either drop the air return temp a little bit (stage 1 is running, half cooling) or it will drop the air temp a lot (stage two is running, full cooling). Either way the fan moves the same amount of air. In stage 1 mode ...


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Is the blower cage turning in the right direction? For some reason the blower motor changed direction? On my air handler the ecm module was replaced and instead of cw turn a ccw was installed. I found it out next day, everything was frozen inside the air handler cabinet than I found the motor was running the wrong direction.


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If the upstairs is truly another zone there should be a separate damper to close it off or reduce the flow. Zoned means you have separate control over different areas. Sounds like you either need to adjust the existing damper or install one. Good luck!


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Shutting some internal doors might help. Especially the door to the room upstairs with the return vent, to avoid pulling hot air upstairs. Anywhere air can get out upstairs (e.g. bathroom extractors, trickle vents) can encourage convection too. If there's heat in the downstairs hallway you might want to restrict it. I have had to do this with our (wet) ...


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The pan tablets are to prevent gunkies from growing. You do not want to be checking freon levels unless your system has a site glass. Then watching for bubbles in the glass, some fully charged systems will have bubbles. The reason you don't want to check pressures that requires opening the system and a small amount of freon is lost. HVAC techs use special ...


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It sounds like the heating coil(s) are going bad. You should have it serviced by a qualified HVAC technician. Good luck!


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The single most important thing you should do is hire a reputable local professional through a personal reference. There are a whole lot of shady, fly-by-night rip-off artists selling themselves as "duct cleaners". If you don't have a personal reference, go down to the local Mom and Pop hardware store and ask for a reference.


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Move your crap out of the way. They'll need access to all return air vents and the plenum near your furnace. If they have to wait around for you or move stuff themselves you may get charged more. I'd also ask them to let you see the ducts yourself. The one time I paid for this service there were rolled-up batts of dust left behind like you wouldn't believe. ...


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Based on the installation instructions for the model you listed, you have two AAA batteries. I recommend you begin by replacing them.



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