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Based on the new information... It looks like the blue wire from the secondary side of the transformer is the R, which would make the yellow secondary wire C. I should have read the transformer label, that clearly says BL (Blue) is common, and yellow is 24V.


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Land lord said nothing about a hole in the roof :) Roof vents are -really- easy to install, and look great when done properly! The directions on the box will tell you everything you need to do, but really it really is just as simple as cutting a hole in the roof, caulking, and tucking under a few shingles! If they don't go for a roof vent, you could use ...


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Something that meets or slightly exceeds the 35 in-lb rating, and matches the 24V spec (though you could check if your system is using AC or DC, and just get one to match your system rather than an AC/DC version.) I suppose the time should fall in the general range of this one's 80-110 seconds as well, so vents are not slamming open and closed, but I ...


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You could try having the ducts Aerosol Duct Sealed. An expensive process not intended for it's acoustical value, but I assume it would offer some. Reduce noise from forced air furnace. -More related to unit noise then from people, but you still have two basic options: baffles or insulation. Other options: move the TV so it doesn't shoot at the registers; ...


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If the j-box has a neutral (it may or may not), you could wire up the WeMo to switch only one of the hot legs. I won't describe the details of my proposal since it involves rewiring the outlet and daisy-chaining some additional outlets and plugs, but it could be done. If this is enough info to jog your creativity, go for it. If you don't know what I'm ...


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It's hard to say for sure one way or another without evaluating your specific circumstances, but the SEER 21 option is probably not worth it. You get diminishing returns from increasing SEER. Going from SEER 10 to SEER 16 should get you close to a 40% reduction in your cooling costs; going to SEER 21 only brings that up to about a 55% reduction. An extra ...


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There is a new player in this industry, but they're running about $100 per device with Nest integration: https://www.ecoventsystems.com/your-system/


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The previous person answering your question does not have a sufficient understanding of HVAC systems. For the past fifteen years, I have been working on such systems five days a week. I have learned a few things about such systems. As long as you have more than one return in your home, capping one return will not damage your system in any way. I set up ...


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You can also buy a digital thermostat with a pass code, no one but you can change settings


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Yes, it is just that easy. You will need a timer with a 'dry contact' or relay output. If you take power from the pump, remember it is (likely) 240 volts. Removing power from the pump will not remove power from the emergency heat strips, or from the fan. Removing power from the pump may, or may not, turn off the reserving valve (Heat mode / Cooling mode) ...


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Your question is not long at all, much better too much information than not enough. If it were mine: Remove everything starting with the 125 amp breaker until you hit the disconnects on the HVAC stuff. 6/2 Romex - copper is good for 60 amps (NEC 240.4 (B) & 334.80 -60 degree) A couple of breakers, romex connectors and big staples Should be less ...


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Unless I'm missing something in your explanation, using the 2/0 AL wire doesn't seem to be a problem, except that it's AL and the unit does not specify AL. What will probably be simpler than running all new wire is to just get AL-to-copper splice connectors. And in response to: if I run two separate circuits/lines, do I need to tie together to the (2) ...


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Adapting a 120V controller for a 240V (208 is unlikely unless you have 3-phase power) plug seems remarkably foolish... Quoting wikipedia: "NEMA 6 devices, while specified as 250 V, may be used for either 208 V or 240 V circuits, generally depending on whether the building has a three-phase or split-phase power supply, respectively." To Quote Belkin, Wemo ...


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We've installed dozens of these and similar systems. I even have one in my own home. You can up to 4 heads, all of various sizes according to the rooms demands.Efficiencies vary greatly between brands and models. DIY??? No. Unless you have a vacuum pump ($800), micron gauge ($150), nitrogen tank ($400) and purging gauges ($75), charging gauges ($125) and ...


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2 things to check. Is the distribution water tray on the top of the filter level? If the water is not making evenly across the entire water tray, you will not be using all the area of the pad, and output would be low. A follow on would be to watch volume of the water fall into the distribution tray. The water only flows all the way down to the pad from a ...


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The quote is fair for what they offer, but to me, steam is not where to start. Cost on a evaporative pad based humidifier, installed, should be under $1000 even if labor is $100 an hour. Also note that steam is generated with an electric heater, which can get expensive, quickly, fast, all heating season. I think I would start with a evaporative pad system, ...


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I suggest a swamp cooler - or as Home Depot calls them online 'Portable Evaporative Cooler.' The big ones (which do come with wheels), a seem to do well in the reviews. There are many negative ones, but those seem mostly from people who do not understand what the product does. The are listed under the Air Conditioning heading, and talk about how much cooler ...


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It should spin freely... I looked at neighbor's condenser fan and they all spin freely with very slight force. However how a motor spins isn't necessarily indicator of whether it works or not. A coil could have shorted or insulation burnt. You can test this by taking an ohmmeter, one lead to the motor leads, and the other to the case. If there's continuity ...


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Get a short piece of thin wire that is bare at each end. Locate the fan limit control switch on the wall of the furnace near the burners. It should be app. 1.5" by 3" and brown or tan in color, and will have two wires going to it. If it is still readable it will say "fan / limit control" along with numeric values such as "180 -20 degrees" or something ...


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Do you have a budget in mind for adding the ac? You can use a water-cooled unit, but plan to spend $1500 and up. These units can be hooked up to a water supply (sink, garden hose, etc.) and drained back to a sink, outside, or wherever is available. The heat from the air is transferred to the water - much like a geothermal ac or heat pump works. We use these ...


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If the steel door is of a standard size, see what it would cost to buy another door of the same size. Then ask the landlord if you can replace it with your own door, and cut a hole in that. In the optimal case this would just require lifting the old door off the hinges and the new door in its place. At most you have to unscrew the hinges and move the lock ...


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I'll bet you can take a piece of OSB, cut it just smaller than the jamb of the door, put some pipe insulation around it, and make a press-to-fit door. Cut a vent in the middle, hook up the AC hose and you're done. It will only work when you are there. Idea 2 - move involved. Open the door so there is a gap of about 8". Now build a frame around the door as ...


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I have learned to not dispute things Tester has said, it is bad for one's reputation in this part of the world. I will not say he/she is wrong in this answer. I will not be insulted if you just pass by this answer. --- WARNING --- I write too many words and use too much detail in my writing, always have and always will. Even my warning was too long. ...


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There are ventless portable a/c units. they are typically in the 5,000 BTU range. They have a container that holds the moisture that is removed from the air which you must empty manually. In very high humidity areas it can become full in as little as a few hours. As you can imagine they are not particularly efficient as the heat it generates is contained in ...


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I had something like this growing up, except ours sucked and did not blow. Air flow was adjusted by how far you opened the window in each room. It worked really well on many of the cooler nights. Whole House Fan - Lowes lists one as Model #: WH302BDX


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On the schematic, the BL wire in the section labeled "Low Voltage Field Connection" near the bottom of the diagram. That's the C wire. Click for larger view It appears as though the "C" wire is bonded to the chassis, so you should be able to connect the C wire from the thermostat to the chassis as well. In the last photo, if you follow the yellow wire ...


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It will be an issue, at some point. As Steven said (not that steven, the other one), The problem will be heat build up behind and beside the unit. Compressor running all the time, thermal shut off, when it gets too annoyed. The heat could also lead to condensation issues, or it might be my being jealous and wanting to find a reason to make critical ...


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The system in our new house is setup so that in the winter the condensate from the heater drains through the washing machine drain.


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i would suggest having an HVAC contractor visit to examine all of your ductwork. My guess would be there are wholes, gaps, or rips in the ducts whereupon the system in operation is pulling the dust in from wall cavities, basement or attic (depending on where the ductwork runs). Once the contractor (or yourself) seals up and/or replaces any ductwork then ...


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Abandon the below grade ductwork, they're always nothing but problems. Your equipment works fine? then don't get up-sold on a new one. Unless... If it's a down-flow furnace, you might not be able to convert it to up-flow, to send it through new ceiling ducts, so maybe that's where the one HVAC guy is coming from (why you'd need a new system). Having to ...


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If your basement is already mostly comfortable without the problematic supplemental furnace and its ducts, why not spend the money on properly insulating the basement instead? That way it will likely be all the way comfortable when heated from the heat of the main furnace, and then you can fully abandon and/or remove the redundant furnace and have lower ...


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You can either cap the wire with a twist-on wire connector (or similar device), or clip the uninsulated portion of the wire off. Once the uninsulated portion of the wire is covered, you can just tuck it away. To be extra safe, you can disconnect the other end of the wire from the furnace.


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It's likely not connected to anything. If you go to the furnace, you'll likely see the cable that goes to the thermostat. You'll also likely see the brown wire either wrapped around the cable, or just not connected to anything.


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I just had this very issue happen to me. It's been a cold few weeks and the drain going to the outside of the house must have started backing up slowly. The drain pan ended up freezing with a top layer of ice and then water spilled into the ceiling. Anyway, the answer to your heat cable issue for the drain pipe is the "easy heat freeze cable". You will ...


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The present through the wall vents on furnaces have a problem..as a safety feature when snow accumulates around exhaust the furnaces shuts down...Great concept, however maritime winters will find you out shoveling snow away from vents on a regular basis especially the winter of 2014/15..


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Your furnace is shutting down on limit. There can be a number of causes for this. Start by making sure you have a clean filter in the furnace. A dirty or restrictive filter can cause this issue. Alternatively you could also have a dirty or plugged up A/C evaporator coil which is located above your furnace. This can also cause a furnace to cycle off on high ...


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Not sure what model equipment you're using, but it seems like the new thermostat requires a neutral connection. If this is the case, you'll want to make the connections as follows: At the Thermostat Connect the black wire to the B terminal in your diagram. Connect the white wire to the N or neutral terminal. Connect the red wire to the Heat (and Cool if ...


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AKA: Dirty Sock Syndrome (paraphrased), caused by the growth of mold and bacteria on the coil. Heat pumps (central HVAC) are particularly susceptible because, unlike conventional heat exchangers, their heating cycles are not hot enough to kill the microbes that thrive on their wet coils during the cooling season. Instead, the temperature is just warm enough ...


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Your primary limit is on lockout. You have to change it out. The problem is either a dirty filter that hasn't been changed in a couple years, or you have to clean off A - coil Finns to get better air flow due to running a system without a filter for a long period of time.


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Same thing my the system in my house. Uses a MERV 16 5". Smell was the filter itself. Dont know what it picked up, but it was generating its own odor. Whew ! I think it started after I baked a beef roast. which smoked a bit when in the oven. Maybe something in rhe meat ?


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A whistling sound at the return often indicates the grill is too small relative to the duct attached to it. Does consistently leaving the doors open allow the system to sufficiently heat and cool the home? For most bedrooms with more than 100 cfm of supply aor a 1 inch door cut is not sufficient opening for return air. If you have carpet installed it is ...


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One option would be "low-volume, high-velocity" ducted system (manufacturers include SpacePak and Unico) that uses a series of small 2" diameter ducts to distribute air. Depending on the size of your joists, 2" holes may be acceptable. As @Ecnerwal mentioned, mini-splits can be a good option too.


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You could put in a non-forced air heating system - ie, hydronic or radiant, using water in pipes to deliver heat. You could use mini-splits for A/C only or for heat and A/C. You only need space for ducts if you need ducts, and there are plenty of houses without ducts... Edit: you may be able to work with a wide, shallow duct so you can have a broad, not too ...



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