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For the record, I tried it out myself. I installed the Cool-N-Save system on a 4-ton A/C unit that was scheduled to be replaced in three months. After that three month period in the middle of the summer, the positive effects of the system were negligible at best, and probably detrimental. There were no detectible savings in cooling costs nor increase in ...


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I have a 3,200 square foot home (2,800 down and 400 up) that has a single 5-ton unit with three dampered zones and one "dump" zone. I live in South Texas and we have dozens of 100+ degree days every summer. My system is able to hold the house easily at 74 degrees in all zones even when it is 100 degrees outside. A few thoughts: First my home is relatively ...


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Rather than focussing on how it's done (inverter drive) focus on what it does (variable speed compressor) Essentially, the variable speed allows the compressor speed to match the cooling load, so rather than a fixed speed compressor starting, cooling, stopping, starting, cooling, stopping a variable speed model can simply adjust its speed to match the ...


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The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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The Common leg of the 24 volt power supply is where all the 24 volt circuits terminate to complete their circuit.


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Common leg of the 24 volt control circuits is grounded, Red is not. Common is the side of 24 v power that every 24 v circuit terminates to complete its circuit.


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The Nest says Common need not be wired up usually, however it often is required to work correctly and charge the stat up.


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The below are all you have to worry about, Yellow need not be wired to Y at the air handler as it is a dummy trminal for convenience, many simply run Y from the stat to the AC unit outside bypassing the Y terminal on the air handler.


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See below, if you jumper Yellow to White the heat strips will run in both cool and heat as Yellow is energized in both modes, what makes it a cooler or heater is the O being energized in cool mode Rheems use the B terminals to be energized in heat.


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The YELLOW or Y terminal at the furncae/ air handler is a dummy terminal for convenience, it is not required to be used, you could send Yellow directly to the AC unit out doors. Common will be used since the Common leg of power comes from the transformer which is in the furnace. The Yellow going to common likely if you trace it back it in fact is ...


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You will wire the cooling transformer to RC and the heat transformer to RH


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You moved the Green to C on one end but the picture with the transformer in the top left shows Green still on G there it should be on C. The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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Go to the transformer and see what wire is common, it will be opposite of RED going to the thermostat on R or Red. Common is the side of 24 v power that every 24 v circuit terminates upon to complete its path. You will read 24 volts across every wire with Red , only with a call for heat will white not read 24 volts to red from white as the switch between ...


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A cracked heat exchanger comes to mind first, leaking supply ducts causing negative pressure, a bad thermocouple, bad


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Usually the evaporator coil is obstructed/dirty, this reduces the air flow. Pleated air filters that are dirty, closed registers, a broken heat ex-changer or a bad limit.


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You need to install a return air grill designed to have an air filter installed. This is much more convenient and more likely to get changed as a result. The placement of a filter in the unit in an attic is not a wise choice.


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You should check the wiring in the furnace. There are no standards for thermostat wire colors, so you can't always trust the color of the wires. Seeing how the wires connect to the furnace, is a sure fire way to figure out what's what. The O (cool mode) and B (heat mode) terminals are usually used for a reversing valve, in heat pump systems. I'm not ...


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We found an HVAC guy to build it from photos and measurements. With a bit of nudging, it went in after I cut the right whole in the box.


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Check your drain lines for water run off. Make sure they are clear and then check the float for the excess water shut down reset them


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We had the same problem in our house, and we've simply lived with it - having had HVAC companies come out and inspect or evaluate it. They all said the system was in good working order, and was appropriately sized for our house. This year we replaced 3 windows and a doorwall in the first floor of the house, and suddenly we can not only maintain a ...


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Is there a small switch somewhere n the thermostat that says something like "fan" and has positions for "auto" and "on"? Is it in the "On" position? If what you mean is that the fan keeps blowing when the thermostat is not calling for cooling (but the air at that point is not being cooled) that could be it. Otherwise, look for a short circuit in the ...


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The hot attic has more latent heat (water vapor) due to both it's higher temperature and being vented to the outside. As that air mixes with the cooler interior air, relative humidity rises. When the more humid air hits the cold uninsulated duct, it condenses. The first step is to seal the opening between the attic and the interior space to reduce ...


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If the lines are the same temperature, that means they're at the same pressure. Which is normal when the system is not running. Once the system starts, the pressure in one line should go up, while the other goes down. Since the pressures in your system are basically equal, I'd say the refrigerant is low. You can verify this be connecting a set of gages ...


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You are correct the refrigerant is not a consumable. If a system is low on refrigerant, then it has a leak. The technician should have a "sniffer" tool that can detect refrigerant leaks. If they didn't use it last time, then they were irresponsible. Also, refrigerant is expensive so that attitude of "if it gets low again then we know you have a leak" is ...


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Another solution -- the one used in my house for both the condensing furnace and the dehumidifier -- is to run the drainage into what amounts to a small sump pump, so the water can be sent through a hose up to ceiling level, across the room, and then down into the drain.


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I think I'd suggest looking for alternatives which don't involve that window well. Perhaps a ducted A/C would let you install the ducts through the wall above the sill (as you would a dryer's output).


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You would be far better off building a roof type structure over the window well that is well above the window well and projects far enough out around the edges of the well that rain water does not enter the well. Trying to jury rig a scheme to keep an existing lid open "just enough" sounds like a recipe waiting for disaster. Either it will be left closed ...


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I'm imagining it's only a 1/2" pipe, in which case maybe an on-floor cord protector might work: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Legrand-Wiremold-5-ft-Over-Floor-Cord-Protector-CDBK-5/100669770 Or you could re-route the pipe around the perimeter of the room to avoid the heaviest traffic.


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Consumer Reports groups single-room A/Cs roughly into small/medium/large categories (100 to 300 square feet, 250 to 400 square feet, 350 to 650 square feet), and from what I've seen the BTU ratings and room sizes on A/C boxes in stores seem to follow the same general formula (probably they're all referencing the Energy Star calculations). Yes, one can ...



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