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5

Nonsense... there's no way the output from the AC will damage a modern cabinet. The carcass of the cabinet is undoubtedly plywood or MDF which is plenty dimensionally stable. If you're still worried, add louvers and point the exhaust away from the cabinets, but I wouldn't give it a second thought.


4

Sorry I don't have enough points to comment yet so have to put this reply in the answer. I had a vent coming out under the cabinets in the kitchen of my house for 20 years with NO PROBLEM (i.e. at the floor level where the kick-plate is). This wasn't even ductwork under the cabinet, but rather the vent exhausted into the frame under the cabinets, which ...


0

I have only seen them side by side, but close together still. Code does not want an intake too close to an exhaust vent.


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No. It's not good. Go in the attic first and check the overflow pan. Mine was full. Nice tip for ya. I used a diaper to absorb all that water.but after that you may want to get it checked out for sure.


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You should be fine connecting the unused blue wire to the C terminal in the furnace/air handler. You'll notice that on the Y terminal that there's a yellow wire from the thermostat, and a white wire that presumably goes to the outdoor unit. The red wire connected to the C terminal, simply completes the circuit through the outdoor units contactor coil. ...


4

Generally, interior drywall is easier to repair than exterior wall treatments. You haven't stated what your wall is made of, in my area the norm is stucco over lath and paper; much more difficult to repair properly. I recommend an initial exploratory opening of the interior wall to assess damage and prospects for access and repair that way.


1

Continuous fan operation equalizes temperature and humidity between different areas of the home, and particularly between levels (where convection results in higher upstairs temperatures). It's also the case that even minor airflow helps a person feel cooler by enhancing evaporation on the skin. It's a good practice to reduce cooling costs because the ...


2

Find out what the A/C guy did. I would guess he did something which improved the performance of the A/C system, so now, instead of the motor nearly freewheeling against little load, it's having to hunker down and really work. The increased amperage is "bringing to the surface" a pre-existing problem with wiring, probably between the sub-panel and the ...


3

Air conditioners do not magically lose refrigerant. If refrigerant is missing, the air-conditioner leaks; if the leak is not fixed, it will continue to leak. Fixing the leak is a related service that you absolutely require before you even think of adding refrigerant or having anyone else do so. Since you quite obviously are not equipped to find and fix the ...


1

Alright -- the trick with the PEK for you is to treat everything wirenutted to your two thermostat cables as the "furnace" from the PEK's standpoint. You'll need some 18AWG pigtails for the connection from the PEK to the "furnace", though, as follows: Red/black nut to PEK cover (furnace) R White nut to PEK cover (furnace) W Green nut to PEK cover (furnace)...


0

I knew of one guy who tried a soaker hose on the roof. Since he turned it on only when the roof was hot, it took grains off the shingles, shortening the life of the roof. I would want this kind of cooling for only a short burst of heat that overloads my air conditioner. We have maybe a two or three day burst of heat once a year that makes a boost necessary ...


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I'd consider having a filter holder made up that held two of the cheaper 20x20's at a sufficient angle that the full area of each was working, and made in such a way that the frame of each was fully engaged. Less (replacement filter) cost, more active filter area. How hard that would be to retrofit would depend on your particular installation/constraints.


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I think I would buy a replaceable medium frame that can be cut to size and the filter material in bulk like 25' or 50' at 36" then cut a new piece every month and replace the old one. This has saved me many more dollars over the years and 2 friends that love them. It takes a few minutes to cut and install the new material but is way cheaper than standard ...


1

In order for your air filters to work correctly, they must be the exact size made for the filter box otherwise yes, dirt, dust, etc. will get sucked right through the gaps. Even if you were to seal the gaps with duct tape, it would only last a little while before it came off. Your AC system will last much longer and be more efficient which will save you more ...


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I have had these systems installed on commercial applications. The system principal working method , Outside air is measured in temperature, i.e. the cooling system is calling for 74° and the exterior temperature is 63, two separate ventilation systems open, The forced air to supply your house with the cool air opens and the fan turns on. A second, exhaust ...


1

What you have is a four-pipe hydronic system with individual air handling units in each dwelling unit -- this is a very common system in larger buildings of all kinds, and works quite smoothly. Just tell the HVAC folks that the blower in your AHU is shot and they'll know exactly what's up.


1

I think you're asking where air would come from in a modern, well-sealed home, in order to replace that which escapes through an open window. The answer is simply that there's no such thing as a "sealed" home. Even brand new, ultra-efficient homes have countless tiny leaks. Door seals. HVAC penetrations. Recessed light fixtures. Gaps in vapor barriers. They ...


0

My issue was compressor coil needed cleaning I used Web Condenser Coil Cleaner Turned off AC Sprayed two cans of Web Condenser Coil Cleaner on all the sides Let it sit there for 15 minutes Washed with Water hose let it dry for 30+ minutes Turned off the unit


-2

Simple trick that fixed my problem. Replace the batteries but put them backwards per direction. It will shut of the lo batt warning then put the batteries correctly. Voila! Weird but worked!


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Before anything, try reset button at the furnace itself hidden behind the cover. It's one of those that activates when the cover is on and deactivates when the cover is off. My problem was exactly that.


0

The Number of Windows and sliding glass doors also play into the calculation, it sounds like you have good insulation, but that area gets much hotter than where I live. Some of the calculators on line are focused on energy savings and provide questionable advice in my opinion. The best way to find out would be to talk to neighbors with similar sized homes. ...


2

Sure you can buy gauges, leak sniffers, temperature probes, and a bunch of other gizmos. Unfortunately, it doesn't really make any difference. The average homeowner doesn't have the knowledge, skill, tools, experience, or certificates required to repair problems with the refrigerant system. You can determine you have a leak, and even find the exact ...


2

Yes you can buy gauges, but do you know what you are doing? Do you have a 608 small appliance licence?(systems under 5 lb most homes have larger ones and require the high pressure license). Next just having gauges will only give you a ball park, a dual temp gauge (at minimum a good single temp gauge) is needed to understand what the pressures really are. If ...


0

It looks like water damage to me. Likely either a roof leak or a condensation problem with one of the ducts (or something else entirely that you don't know is there?). It's also possible for the leak to be elsewhere above the ducts and this is just where the water found its way down to the ceiling. Do you have access to the area above(attic)? If so, ...


1

I'd start by checking the start capacitor for the fan motor. If that's starting to go bad, the motor could be drawing high current for too long while trying to start.


0

It's possible to change the motor, but doing so may not change anything. In fact, blindly changing the motor could actually cause the system to perform worse. Without knowing a ton more about the system, it's impossible to diagnose the actual problem. It could very well be poor duct design, an undersized system, or a whole host of other problems. The ...


0

You can have the overlook to all the available modes in the market with their specifications.According to the specifications you can have the grading.


1

When you asked to increase the blower, what you are really asking to do is increase the fan speed (amount of air), right? You could ask the the tech to check/verify that you are getting 1600 CFM (cubic feet per minute) and if you truly are, and if that's not enough, ask them if it is possible to increase it (it might be adjustable). But I am thinking that ...


1

Here it is thanks. A return duct will help the air flow into the room when the door is closed. Up sizing the supply and dampers to to help provide more flow may also help. In my last home I had 2 dampers that I adjusted 1 for up stairs and 1 for down. More air to the upstairs in summer when it was cold and more down in the winter when the heat was on. Since ...


0

Sounds like you have tried the basic items. You could try replacing the breaker. If you continue to have a problem then you will have to call an air conditioning service technician to check the unit out completely. Good luck!



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