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3

What you’re describing sounds like a combination of negative pressure in the compartment that the drain pan connected to and an incorrectly sized p-trap on the condensate drain. The depth of the t-prap has to be greater than the negative pressure in inches of water column of the compartment where the drain is connected to. A t-prap with insufficient depth, ...


2

If liquid refrigerant gets in the compressor, it can indeed cause damage. The compressor is designed to compress gas, trying to compress liquid can burn out the motor. Let the system defrost. Fix the filter. Then turn it back on. If the system still isn't cooling, you'll have to troubleshoot it yourself, or contact a professional to do it. Make sure you ...


0

You don't offer much detail in your question, so it's difficult to determine exactly what you want to do. If you're just looking for manual control you could just energize the G terminal on the furnace, which will run the fan in high speed mode (if the furnace has a variable speed motor). Most thermostats have a switch labeled AUTO and FAN. If you put the ...


1

Since you haven't supplied much detail, I'll have to use nonspecific examples based on typical installation methods. Furnace and Condensing unit If you have a setup where you have a furnace, and an outdoor condensing unit. The wiring will be similar to this (Note: This is a basic overview, not actual wiring). Basically, the R wire provides power to the ...


0

Any material you use will need to be fireproof, since it contacts the brick chimney. You can't count on the existing furnace to be the last one ever installed in that location, so any installation you do now will have to be safe for the next furnace, too... and since you can't know anything about the next furnace's specifcations, you need to take every ...


1

Inadequate refrigerant causes the evaporator (and sometimes the condensor) to form ice or frost on the outside. The usual fix is to have a HVAC tech repair the refrigerant leaks and recharge the system. You can save some of the service call cost by looking for the leaks and pointing them out. Soapy water works well applied with a spray bottle or small ...


0

Sounds like either a bad over-temp switch, or cause for an over-temp. Replace the plenums over temp sensor, or remove obstructions from the air system (dirty coil or filter, closed registers, half detached and now hanging duct insulation.) If all else fails cut the gas back some by slightly closing the gas valve, however be prepared to have to reset the ...


0

B-vent is what should be used for exhausting gas appliances and most likely why you have a gap in a 6" escussion with a 6" pipe in it. Notice the ID and OD for B-vent. If its just an air handler for a bath fan use a flapper vent. AMPG's PDF Now you can fill the new 1/8~1/4" gap with an approved high temp caulk.


0

I'd pack it carefully with rock wool or fiberglass batting. DO NOT permit the two dissimilar metals to contact each other where there's any chance of moisture getting into the contact area, or you'll get galvanic corrosion at the junction, which can lead to leakage and exhaust gases getting back into the structure.


0

I have experienced several types of residential HVAC draining systems. The most common is a basic, gravity run. A simple line that runs down hill from the condensate pan until it exits the residence and drips onto the ground. The other system I have seen involves a gravity fed line from the condensate pan to a reservoir that has a float, switched pump in it ...


0

Well, i don't really see an issue with this since the condensate water is basically distilled water with neutral PH. The legal issue with it may be due to furnace condensate water which contains carbonic acid. Using a neutralizer will take away almost all the acidity, however some municipalities still don't allow either condensate water to be piped to the ...


0

Not only is it okay to drain it into the sump, in many localities it is against code to drain it into a sink (or anything else that connects to the sewers).


-2

Just get an extension cord, cut off one end and wire the ground to the green ground lug or wire. Next, wire the red to the 'fan" side of the cap and wire the black to the hot wire (could be black or white so read the diagram)


2

For the record, I tried it out myself. I installed the Cool-N-Save system on a 4-ton A/C unit that was scheduled to be replaced in three months. After that three month period in the middle of the summer, the positive effects of the system were negligible at best, and probably detrimental. There were no detectible savings in cooling costs nor increase in ...



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