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Comment converted to answer If you don't have cooling, why are you using the Y terminal? If you have only heat, you can use Red for R, Green for G White for W, and Blue forC`. Also, you'll want to check the rating on the transformer (in volt-amperes) in the furnace and the thermostat (in milliamperes).


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Simply put, moist air from anything can build up condensate. If this moist air or vented furnace vapor is exposed to freezing temperatures, eventually it will form a build up. The temperature inside has to be greater than freezing air around it, or it will build up a frosty ice cube. Pay close attention to insulating heat exchange if the furnace is not ...


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Typically yes, but without knowing the furnace and equipment you have (ie: central air?) it's hard to say for certain. There should be a wiring diagram somewhere in the unit. Here is a generic diagram, again, without knowing your exact unit this is just for reference.


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The device labeled "PS-802 ELWCO", is a low water cut-off. The "C" terminal there, is not the C you're looking for. I believe the white wire from the transformer, is what you'll want to connect your C wire to. I'm not 100% confident though, since I'm not that familiar with this system. You may be able to contact the manufacturer for confirmation.


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You have a bad high limit switch, or the furnace is overheated. The high limit switch is in place to make sure the furnace doesn't heat up to the point that it damages itself, or anything around it. If the furnace gets too hot, the limit switch opens. When the switch opens the burners turn off, but the blower continues to run in an attempt to clear the heat. ...


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Air filters are intended to: Protect HVAC equipment. Mitigate air-quality issues. The manufacturer will specify requirements necessary for normal equipment service life. Until there are actual air quality issues, there is no reason to upgrade filters. Monitoring air quality may be appropriate because some air-quality issues are better mitigated ...


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You could tandem a thermostat upstairs, but you will always be wasting heat downstairs. The proper solution is two furnaces or space heaters upstairs. I have a separate zone upstairs with a thermostat, but because we mostly only use one room up there I heat that room with a space heater.


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From the Owner's manual. Hardwiring Requirements (24V and 230V Operation) For 24V models: Connect black and white wires to a dedicated 40Va transformer. (Not Provided.) Notice that it says "to a dedicated 40Va transformer". This means that you'll have to install a 40VA transformer to power the device, not use the transformer in the HVAC unit. ...


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I would recommend first contacting a home energy efficiency company first rather than an HVAC company. HVAC guys are usually clueless about systemic problems like these and will usually try to sell you a larger unit without diagnosing the true cause of the issue (which is a pain in the neck and can probably be fixed for much less than the cost of new ...


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If you're not going to do the work yourself, you could contact any local Heating & Air Conditioning company (HVAC). They will be able to find and repair any problems with the system. As for zoning, it's definitely possible. How easily it can be done; and to what degree, completely depends on your house, and how willing you are to potentially open up ...


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The capacitor needs replacement. While it is possible there is a circuitry problem causing the capacitor to overheat (and thus fail like this), it is also possible it was simply time for this electrolytic capacitor to fail while nothing else is wrong. See this photo for a similar failure mode.


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I've highlighted a few things in your photo. The Blue area labeled Thermostats, is where your thermostats connect. Based on the information I could find: T4 = W used to call for HEAT. T5 = R Power from the transformer. T6 = Y used to call for COOL. Based on this, the wiring at your new thermostat should be: White - R Red - W Blue - Y That should ...


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Does the ratio of static pressures between two stories differ at different blower speeds? That's a very interesting question, but I believe it's a moot point. Any dramatic difference would mean your system isn't balanced correctly in the first place. (needs zoning, split systems, or an actual balancing) Stack effect will cause plenty of heat to go upstairs, ...


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This is a classic sign of low refrigerant. Refrigerant is not a consumable, so low levels indicate a problem. This is not something you can fix yourself. Call a technician, but don't let them just top it off and leave; make them stick around to find the leak.


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Technically I suppose you could remove the insulation around flex. Why would you want to though? I understand that it fits tight through there but in my installation of commercial duct work (on the side) we have just compressed the insulation. It is after all flexible. One thing that insulation around duct work does is prevent condensation on your ducts when ...


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This is not normal. When the thermostat energizes the G terminal, only the blower fan should come on. Check for a jumper/short between Y and G either at the thermostat, or the air handler.


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Fix If the pipes have been deformed (by placing something heavy on them, for example) then you can try bending them back to a round shape. If they're deformed to the point they actually have folds or creases in them, I'd give up and throw them out. New ducts Round ducts are sold as sheets with a special fold along the two sides that interlock into each ...


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When I get the duct lines from big box they come in sheets that you have to eventually bind into a cylinder. I create my first. Then I only bind the second on the bottom foot or two. Meaning the top is still not shape - so it bows out. This causes the bottom to pinch in slightly. I push it into the first duct, then finish binding it... and so on and so ...



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