New answers tagged

1

Does this furnace have a condensate drain? I had a similar problem with a high-efficiency gas furnace, and the problem turned out to be a gummed up condensate trap. I disconnected the hose from the front end of the trap, and about a quart of water poured out of the drain line. I removed the trap, flushed it with water for about 5 minutes, reconnected, and ...


0

This is not really an answer, since I don't think this can be answered without being on site. Rather, I'm going to explain a bit about how the system works, and offer a few ideas as to what the problem could be. To start, you'll want to understand how air moves through the system. You'll want to know the difference between conditioned air, and combustion ...


0

The high limit being taken off the wall of the fire box it will never over heat. Try removing 1 of the leads to the switch if the furnace keeps running it is not the limit switch. Most of these limits have a manual reset button you need to press if they do overheat. If the furnace keeps going with the limit wire removed you need to have the controls fully ...


0

In either case you have a 10" duct as the bottleneck in the trunk line. Expanding it downstream won't get you much in terms of flow. I'd go with Plan A. Perhaps a more important question: Is the inlet attached to the fireplace somehow? You'll probably be disappointed if you just pull air from one room to another. The differential would be so small that you ...


0

Rephrasing the question a little "the vents doors cant all be closed...if the AC is powered". So you add a fifth switch (which is just a relay) that either opens one door if the AC is powered, or turns off the AC if all doors are closed.


2

Based on the ladder diagram, it looks like the R terminal is only energized when all the limits (main limit and however many rollout limits there are) are closed. So if any of the limits open, the thermostat loses power (maybe). I can't say for sure; since I'm not familiar with that board, but if that's how the furnace disables itself during a problem. ...


0

If the blower is running nonstop, then there's likely a open limit (probably high limit). If this is a high efficiency unit, and the draft inducer is running continuously before the unit shuts down (lockout). It's likely a problem with the exhaust piping, or a bad pressure switch. Without knowing exactly what's happening, it's difficult to explain how to ...


0

Yes. Old thermostats are passive devices - a bimetal strip with contact blades. The heater provides 24 volts AC via a transformer, used to switch the gas solenoid, fan relay, A/C relay etc. via the thermostat. Smart thermostats need power of their own. That's easy: there's a 24v transformer right there in your furnace, its terminals are called R (hot) and ...


-1

OK. I didn't read all the responses, but thought this would help. If your thermostat has a R and Rc, then there has to be a physical wire (jumper) connecting the R and Rc, along with the red wire going into the R slot. I didn't know this, as I inherited the thermostat from a friend. Heat turned on, AC did not. Once I read up, installed the jumper, ...


2

This problem can be multi-faceted. Someone could guess all day long as to what the problem(s) is / are and not even come close. Air conditioning isn't something to guess at. It's like having a rattle on a car and taking the approach of replacing one part at a time to find the rattle. It would be cheaper to just buy a new car. ( I give that as an example you ...


1

I had a similar issue and could have sworn it was mechanical/electrical. I had a service man come in and he removed the air filter from the handler. It started right up afterwards (i am unsure if there was a reset switch he had to trip). He mentioned that my air handler will shut off if there is a great enough pressure difference between the supply and ...


1

It sounds like the switch is sticking, which is a sign that it's time to swap it out. Before you do, though, make sure the exhaust and condensate drain aren't blocked/restricted. $25 is a fairly cheap test, unless you have a gauge on hand to check the pressure.


1

Water spraying from the copper pipe in your photo would indicate a 3/4 inch copper potable water pipe. This can be repaired with only basic plumbing and pipe sweating skills. It may be simpler to use solder rather than brazing copper rod. Either is acceptable, but since you asked about brazing I will answer that first. You will need a Mapp gas torch with a ...


2

Since this appears to be a plumbing leak, the fix is to shutoff the water, drain it as best you can, cut out the bad section, and solder in a replacement section. The whole process is maybe a 30 minute job and will be much more permanent than any patch you attempt to apply. A pinhole leak in one place may just be the first sign of the entire section of pipe ...


1

After looking at the photo, I'm guessing that's not a refrigerant line. If it was, liquid would not be coming out. Follow the pipe, and find out where each end terminates. That will help you determine what this pipe is for. You do not do this yourself, unless of course you have the equipment, training, and licence to do so. Before you fix the leak, you'll ...


1

Cut the gas back some by slightly closing the gas valve (the one on the pipe, not in the unit), however be prepared to have to reset the furnace occasionally if your local gas pressure drops intermittently. Watch the flames as you do it. Just, "take the edge off". This will cost you more in electricity, as it'll run longer to come up to temp, but it will ...


1

The amount of heat going out of your house has to be made up by your heating system. When its cooler inside(winter) there is less temperature difference from inside to outside and therefore less pressure to move heat out. Therefore heat loss is lower. Looking at run times and saying savings are uncertain is disingenuous at best, except on a heat pump. ...


0

Having an oversized furnace compared to the needs of the conditioned space should not cause furnace limit problems unless the duct system is too small. If the furnace was installed by the same people as the duct system they should be allowed to address the problem. There are limits to how many outlets can be closed without causing this problem.


0

In my area most duct systems are too restrictive as it is. Adding an extra filter would make them more so unless the other filter was removed and the new one was less restrictive. Problems could include AC icing and furnace overheating. As always you can try it and see.


0

A unit like that is designed to slide in from the side or bottom. I'd simply install it as normal, and add 1" metal flanges to the top and inner edges on either the upstream or downstream sides using rivets or screws. It's probably not important that the damper be perfectly centered. You'll need to cut slots in the duct to accommodate the top one. The hole ...


0

I would go over sized rather than undersized if you have the room to do it. An undersized unit will limit your maximum flow, unless you always will be reducing the flow to that area then go undersized. Strips of ducting can be purchased at most home stores that you can rivet from one side to the other then use a good quality duct tape to seal. They make a ...


2

No. You may risk damaging your unit by running it in cooling mode when it is too cold out (although some systems have safeties around this), but heating in low temperatures should not damage the system. No. A correctly functioning heat pump should not ever drop below 100% efficiency. This is dependent upon the specific heat pump model. Often, manufacturers ...


0

If the heat pump has an oporational temp limit it will control itself. Be careful with an awning, it could cause discharge air to recirculate. Not good. Keep the filters clean and don't use much night set-back


1

Temporarily turn off the power to the condensing unit to be certain it's not running at times. You should have a breaker for it in your electrical panel, or a local disconnect box mounted near the condenser itself. If it's a heat pump the insulated line may freeze for short times normally or if the switchover valve is stuck for longer times.


1

Call your gas supplier. ( I'm assuming you have gas piped to you house, and not using propane tanks.) As I found out when I moved from a flat region to one with hills, the gas company comes around a few times a year to check the pressure in the line. It could be your pressure needs adjusting. I also like the negative pressure answer. As an aside, I ...


0

Entirely subjective. But yes, you can do that, and yes it will decrease flow, and yes that's ok. It's definitely not going to improve flow. Test it out and compare to single filter to see what heats/cools your house faster. You can use an energy usage monitor like efergy to quantitatively measure the efficiency of your system with and without the second ...


2

It depends on the home, and the system. Neither of which you've provided much information. Older homes are usually drafty enough to provide adequate combustion air, so dedicated intake are not required. Modern homes tend to be sealed up much tighter, and often require air intakes. Sometimes systems are installed in a utility closet, or other space where ...


0

Old houses leak like crazy and that, alone was typically more than enough to provide both fresh air and combustion air. On new construction, an air exchange handler is the typical way to provide fresh air.


1

A healthy home pulls in air, circulates it, and releases it. You have negative pressure when you are releasing more air than you are pulling in. This could be caused by a blocked intake or an over-working exhaust system. The most common, for a stove, would be a vent hood pulling too much air from your home than it can pull in to keep the fire going (see ...


1

I had the problem here in NE Ohio. Had the ancient furnace replaced with a energy efficient one. The guys installed it, took the old drain line and reconnected my new furnace to it. The frigid cold weather arrived and bingo, came home to a wet carpet and the condensation pump screaming up a storm. I do not have a drain next to the furnace. Well, I called ...


0

That looks like a standard A/C dimmer switch circuit: http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/threads/potentiometer-w-switch-wiring-for-lamp.79664/ I'd imagine you could replace it with a standard A/C variable motor control like this one: ...


2

Yes, you can plumb the outlet of the condensate pump into the tailpiece of the shower. Assuming the condensate line is properly trapped, then there should be no problem. You'll notice in the code snippet below, that it says "If discharged into the drainage system, equipment shall drain by means of an indirect waste pipe.". Which means you cannot, plumb the ...


0

After cleaning the flame sensor, checking ground wire, checking exhaust for cracks or blockage and the board connection which did not fix it. We found that the hanger on the exhaust pipe was hung poorly and causing exhaust pipe to droop down which made it hold condensation that ran back into unit which shut the furnace down. Fixed hanger to make exhaust ...


1

If partially closing a single supply vent caused your high limit to trip you probably have an restriction problem. I would recommend investigating a bypass damper with a return and supply temp. sensor. These devices are typically just a part of a whole house zoning system, but can be used to easily resolve supply air restrictions in situations where ...


0

My Trane (5 yr old) has different possible blower settings for the heat and non-heat periods. My house was getting chilly in spots. So, I turned the fan up during the periods when the thermostat was not calling for heat. That circulates the air and has made the house a more even temperature. Meanwhile, the blower setting when the furnace is on has been ...


2

You can't. I have the same problem. My house has a 125,000 BTU furnace for a 25,000 BTU heat load. My solution? I set the thermostat at 69 and turn it on manually when the temperature falls below 65 or so. This ensures that the furnace runs for a nice long time when it's on, and then stays off the rest of the time. But you don't really even need to do this ...


2

There is a thermocouple, the thing that is glowing red in the pilot light that tells the furnace the pilot lit. If that is bad it will continue to try to light the pilot. They are not real expensive but that would be the first thing to replace.


-2

You've lost power to the outdoor unit. Check the breaker or fuses.


3

I had my own "green" start up company that I sold off 10 years ago- and I use the same guys to install most new systems I put in. Really for most cases all the data will come back to is the average temperature that a home is kept (given that insulation and other thermal constraints are constant). Really the most effective thing to do is to always have ...


3

A furnace only has a drain if it's a high efficiency condensing unit, or it contains an A/C evaporator coil. If it's an older non-high efficiency unit, and there's no integrated air conditioning. Then it probably won't have any type of drain.


0

I would take off the duct tape where the Aprilaire unit connects to the ductwork. I put tape on that same area in my last house and it caused suction problems with the filter inside the Aprilaire unit. It began leaking and causing efficiency problems. You can tape the joints of the duct work but i wouldn't tape at the Aprilaire unit itself.



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