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1

Yes, my parents have had one of these gadgets since the 1980s: http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1273159 http://www.amazon.com/Dryer-Heat-energy-Saver-aceex12/dp/B000H5PTI6 At the time, I seem to recall that running the dryer was something like 10k BTUs, which was significant. However: new washing machines spin much faster, and ...


1

The primary concern with any opening is bulk water infiltration. Sound practice is a minimum of 8" between the sill of the opening and the roof surface to provide for proper flashing and counterflashing. 12" is better. So long as the duct layout and clearances are consistent with the manufacturer's recommendations, the installation should otherwise be fine. ...


0

It's not great to put heat ducts in the ceiling. First off, you will lose a lot of heat from them there even if they are well insulated, and second, heating systems work best if they provide heat at the floor level so it can rise up rather than providing it at the top. You will also need to get ducting up through the first floor and into the attic, which ...


0

Drywall is the enemy. That dryer vent is disconcerting; lets find out what other shenanigans are going on here. You may not have ever done ductwork but at least you seem to know a proper installation will require opening the walls to install rigid (use flexible only if you must). Can you run it in the attic, sure: at a loss of efficiency; longer run, more ...


0

I suspect this will be a DIY project. Note that an alternative would be to simply install ceiling fans in the cathedral ceiling room to circulate its air better, removing most of the stratification you now experience. (I've got upstairs/downstairs zones myself, with definite air exchange at the stairwell. I've considered installing a vertical tube with a ...


0

There is a very simple to install and inexpensive minisplit adapter that will allow you to control your minisplit system with the Nest thermostat. You can contact the manufacturer by email at minisplitcontroladapter@gmail.com


3

The dryer vent and the combustion vent are one and the same. If you try to use the dryer vent for heating you will have two issues, first excess moisture and second carbon monoxide. Gas dryers get their efficiency by directly venting the combustion into the damp clothes which then by the way of evaporation drastically reduces the temp of the heat. It ...


1

A heat-recovery ventilator will give you mostly what you want, though how much you get depends on how big it is and how much it runs.


0

Capping the return and/or the supply in the unfinished basement could both potentially damage the system by causing it to overheat or putting too much stress on the blower motor; without knowing more about the system, here's what I suggest: 1. You're probably okay to close/block the supply register as long as the rest of the registers in your house are ...


0

Before I get into this, I should say that if you paid a professional HVAC company to fix your furnace and they replaced the draft motor 1 month ago, you should call them and tell them they aren't finished yet. If they told you it was fixed and it isn't then there should be a guarantee you can call them on, if there isn't than you should hire somebody else ...


3

I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


1

My top DIY that I've come up with: I sectioned the outside drain pipe and insulation so I can simply detach the sections if they clog with ice and take them inside to thaw in the tub/sink. Usually just the bottom piece. If the build up looks bad then I do #2. I also extended the vent pipe and use a funnel to pour hot water directly in to the drain from ...


0

If there's a Y terminal on the furnace, you should connect the Y wire from the furnace and one of the wires from the condensing unit to it. I typically connect the red wire from the condensing unit to Y, and the white to C. Not that it really matters, that's just how I do it. Other than that, it sounds good.


0

That's plenty of space to install a humidifier, provided it's air intake scoop is designed to operate or can be installed horizontally. Freezing of the supply line or its drain is a concern; steam humidifiers are recommended for unconditioned spaces. Drain it inside, install a catch pan and a shut-off switch, like you have for your AC coil. Sharing that ...


-1

If the small pipe is frozen, the gas is insufficient. Call a service man to recharge some gas again.


0

Of course it could be, but probably isn't. A spinning fan will hit anything in its path regardless of the relative direction of gravity. I'd recommend calling your service person again for further troubleshooting.


0

You'll want to focus your attention to the wiring at the bottom of your last photo, that's where all the control wiring is. Don't touch the wiring on the primary side of the transformer, as it's at line voltage and could cause a nasty shock. If you clip the zip tie holding the bundle of wires together, you should be able to get a better look at what's ...


-1

Remove the jumper between RC and RH on the nest thermostat. The blue wire is C, the rest should make sense. Edit. The above refers to everything at the thermostat. According to the schematic the blue wire at the furnace is a 208v tap. If I'm reading it right it's a brown wire but be careful, some brown wires may be line voltage.


0

Since it became cold enough for you to turn on your heat last night, other people probably did the same thing. This means a surge in load on your utility company's entire grid...and the grids it connects to. This can result in brownouts, greyouts, and blackouts within the utility company's service area. In the US, this is less common than other parts of the ...


3

This is definitely an issue with one of the legs of your main service. This pops up most commonly when the temperatures outside start to change and cause the wires to contract or expand. The power coming in to your house is normally fed by two separate wires, if one of these has become loose, you will see issues on about half the circuits in the house.


11

Sounds like a classic compromised leg of your main service. This problem could be anywhere from the connections at the utility transformer on the pole, to the connection taps on the side of the house, to the meter pan, to the main breaker. IMO this is NOT something for a DIY to troubleshoot since you would need to be testing live unfused wires in places ...


0

Also check your ground. I just ran across an intermittent blower issue (cycling on and off constantly during call for heat from the thermostat) that was due to a poor ground connection on my 120 volt to 24 volt transformer on an old Janitrol furnace. The ground side of the 24 volt half of the transformer had 2 wires connected to it. The good one went to ...


0

Yes, tapping along with the red wire under the (C)OM is where it goes. If you'll notice, your (Y) is already double taped.


1

As the other answer suggests, 50-55 is pretty standard for the purpose of preventing water lines from freezing but there are some other things to consider. I'll also mention that you should consider humidity in addition to temperature. Humidity is measured independent from temperature (aside from the relative humidity), but the important factor here is ...


4

Depends on location but 50-55 degrees Fahrenheit is fairly standard.



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