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8

There are two types of tubing most people think of, when you say "flexible gas tubing". The first and more common, are flexible gas connectors. These guys are typically 3-6' long, and are used to connect appliances to the gas piping. They are only to be used as a short link between the fixed piping and the appliance, and so are considered a "connector" ...


8

Their insurance may lean that way. Rates are probably lower if they are not selling to end-users. They may also not have to deal with sales tax, if they are not selling to end-users. As for the (or more) economic incentive many take for granted: the cost of customer service. The below consumes valuable man-hours and to staff this could double payroll: They ...


8

You need a duct crimper like this to reduce the diameter of the end of one piece of duct: Run the tool around the end of the duct so that you have multiple parallel crimps. That piece should slide right into the uncrimped piece, giving you a secure connection to tape. If you don't want to spring for a dedicated tool, I've seen where people use ...


6

This is due to a sales restriction by the EPA. The logic behind the ban is to minimize the risk of releasing ozone depleting refrigerant into the atmosphere. If you plan to work on HVAC systems fairly often (e.g. if you manage a lot of properties), then you could look into getting yourself certified (it may be a simple as taking some night classes at a local ...


6

You may be able to rig up something whether the compressor-side air intake and exhaust are piped outside, but the efficiency will be low and you may risk burning out the compressor by working it too hard. If you want something you can install in a small opening, you might consider wheeled portable AC units which come with a flexible duct. If you're still ...


5

I am a Local HVAC Tech in the Toronto area. As stated, this exhaust is not installed according to local codes and the manufacturers installation instructions. There is no surprise that you are getting freezing condensation on the brick of the house. The reason for having the vent terminate straight out and away from the building is to avoid this. The facing ...


5

You're looking for a specification called the operating temperature range of the thermostat or router or both. This is the temperature range within which the manufacturer states that the device will function correctly. For consumer electronics like these, it's typically from 0°C (32°F) up to about 60°C (140°F) to 70°C (158°F). So if ...


5

You'll want to check with your local government. The sale of a house often requires some things to be brought up to current code. What things are required, depends on the local government. For example. In my area, sump pumps are required. If you're selling a house without a sump, you'll have to install one before you can close. A nearby area requires ...


4

If you're talking about the seam (circled in red). Then yes, foil tape is appropriate. However, if you're talking about sealing around the pipe (circled in orange). You'll want to use Duct Seal, or an equivalent product.


4

The exhaust pipe discharge is too close to the house. It should extend 8 to 12 inches from the wall if using tee on vent end. The exhaust might have been placed in its odd position because of a gas regulator vent. I see the pipe exits near the gas service. From a survey of high efficiency furnace installation manuals, and my own experience installing my ...


4

Judging by this manual, you have one of these: You described it as terminal 4 but the diagram just shows two terminals labelled "T", but that is fine: I found a manual for an EnviraCom device which shows terminals 2 and 3 are 24vac power: This means we have the right connections, and according to the R7184 manual: EnviraCOM™ Current Available: ...


4

The thermopile in your fireplace puts out millivolts, nothing near the 120V the light switch was designed for. It's probably just a matter of finding a switch with a low enough on resistance. A generic low voltage switch from a electronics store, or ripped out of a toy, would probably do it (for example a 12V SPST). Really here the smaller the better, but ...


4

You should contact an Electrician or HVAC technician. There seems to be a short-circuit somewhere in the circuit supplying the heating unit. DO NOT reset the breaker again until the problem is fixed. The reason I suspect a short-circuit, is because the breakers are reacting so quickly. If this was an overcurrent situation, the main breaker would likely ...


4

This conference presentation (PDF) seems to lay out the process fairly well. It also mentions a few resources that go into more detailed calculations and considerations. The Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association has an overview guide available here (PDF) for improving efficiency. They also have entire standards available for ...


4

You can seal the hole with duct seal. It is a putty-like substance, which can fill the hole around the pipes. Duct seal does not harden, so it is easy to remove in the future. You may have to cut the pipe insulation just short of the hole so you get a good seal. It may be a good time to replace that whole section of insulation while you're working in the ...


4

I'm not a HVAC expert but a 5 ton unit sounds pretty large for a 3000sqft house. You can probably approach this in one of two ways. One is probably what the previous owner did and just throw more cooling capacity at the problem (two units, larger units, etc.). Alternatively, you can start looking at ways to get more out of your existing unit. Some things ...


3

Yes. I was building a new home in Baytown Texas (completed in 2006) and searched far and wide for thermostat controlled dampers - was told by many HVAC companies that "they" remove them weekly - this isn't true. I found one installer in Houston that would do the system the way I suggested - he listened and so did I. We compromised on 2 units with 3 ...


3

Wiring Diagrams Locate the schematic In most cases, a wiring diagram can be located inside the HVAC unit. Typically, it will be on the inside of the access cover. Find the transformer on the schematic Once you've located the diagram, you'll want to look for this symbol. Or the actual text that says "Transformer", which may be labeling a crudely drawn ...


3

I found this link, which is for a whole house: http://www.northernac.com/newcalc.htm This one is for a single room. Assume the room direction is for the northern hemisphere. Reverse North and South if you're in the south. http://www.bhg.com/home-improvement/advice/measuring-materials/window-air-conditioner-size-calculator/> From the comment by mike: ...


3

You do not have enough information to calculate the electrical power consumed during operation. The three quantities listed, 1260 kcal/hr, 1.47 kW and 5000 BTU/hr, all represent the same power level, simply given in different units. They all give, as stated, the cooling capacity: the rate of heat energy removal from the cooled space. A particular ...


3

The blower very likely does spin at different speeds when heating vs. cooling. This is not uncommon at all. In heating mode they typically are on a low speed, while in cooling or fan mode they are typically on high speed. As such, it could certainly be the case that there is some imbalance in your blower that excites a harmonic frequency of your furnace at ...


3

I don't think this is entirely true anymore. Most HVAC suppliers in my area allow "consumers" to buy from them. There is usually a song and dance to be done. For instance anyone can sign up on several large retailers that sell lots of stuff to HVAC techs, electricians, plumbers and so on. We know the big names. What you do is register yourself as a ...


3

All furnace control boards will control the additional features that they come with (such as variable speed, or multi-stage heating and cooling) The terminals on the thermostat will correspond with the furnace control board terminals. The furnace may have more connections than the thermostat, but most are not used or required. For example with ...


3

NEVER JUMP A LIMIT SWITCH TO ALLOW A GAS APPLIANCE TO RUN. THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT SAFETY IN THE SYSTEM AND IS REQUIRED FOR PROPER AND SAFE OPERATION OF THE UNIT. Limit switches may only be jumped by technicians to test and rule out certain components and are not to be left bypassed. Your furnace seems to be going off on High limit. When the fan ...


3

If you want to go completely amateur, you could just stuff it all in there. However, that's going to result in a significant decrease in airflow and will result in a lot of strain on your air handler's blower motor. The cross-sectional area of at 16" ID duct is about 200 square inches. That's the number you need to match or exceed to maintain the same ...


3

Red, here's a diagram that shows airflow in a furnace:


3

These vents are for a high efficiency furnace. One brings in fresh air for combustion, the other exhausts air after combustion. It's separate from the air you breath in your home, hence the high efficiency part. The biggest concerns with these are venting exhaust too close to a window, and having the exhaust sucked back into the intake, but this shouldn't be ...


3

The suction line (the larger pipe) should never be iced up during normal operation. By the time the refrigerant gets to the end of the evaporator coil, it should be completely boiled off (in a gas state). The bottom few coils may frost up, but the top ones should only be sweating at most. If the suction line; or more than the bottom third of the coil, ...


3

First, be wary of the two big capacitors. One is the large "beer-can"-shaped component against the inside wall of the enclosure, and the other is the smaller, silver oval-shaped can right next to it. These can hold electrical charge, and could hurt you. You'll want make sure that they're discharged. Once you unplug the unit, wait a few minutes for the ...


3

Is there a small switch somewhere n the thermostat that says something like "fan" and has positions for "auto" and "on"? Is it in the "On" position? If what you mean is that the fan keeps blowing when the thermostat is not calling for cooling (but the air at that point is not being cooled) that could be it. Otherwise, look for a short circuit in the ...



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