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20

I would really want to know why the switch failed twice, and running the unit without all safety devices seems like a bad plan. I'd find a new tech (don't use the other guy again) to diagnose the actual problem and install a new switch correctly. The tech may have never seen a thermal cut-off switch do anything and decided it wasn't needed, but that's not ...


6

NO The switch is an extremely important safety feature. If you have an oil-fired boiler, it can explode with a tremendous force, enough to destroy your entire house and kill everyone inside. https://www.google.com/search?q=boiler+explosion&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=boiler+explosion&safe=off&tbm=vid If you have an oil-fired air heater (no water to ...


5

Long story short... The guy that installed this thing didn't follow the manufacturer's installation instructions, and did some UGLY plumbing. I would not allow him back in my home. Hire a new contractor, and pay them to fix this guys mistakes.


5

Dehumidifiers work a bit different than A/C units. While A/C units do remove moisture, as a side effect. They also cool the air moving through them, by moving heat away. Dehumidifiers remove the moisture and cool the air, but then they heat the air back up. If you wanted your A/C system to function as a dehumidifier, you'd have to bring back the heat that ...


5

It is generally not worth the time and money to try to capture the lost heat through the exhaust system of the vast majority of tankless/on-demand water heaters. The heaters are now so efficient that they can vent the exhaust through plastic (PVC) pipe. Since these heaters also only operate when there is a call for hot water, they do not run very often. ...


5

Nonsense... there's no way the output from the AC will damage a modern cabinet. The carcass of the cabinet is undoubtedly plywood or MDF which is plenty dimensionally stable. If you're still worried, add louvers and point the exhaust away from the cabinets, but I wouldn't give it a second thought.


4

If the camp has internet access, you may want to look into a WIFI-controlled thermostat. Most allow you to remotely monitor and control the temperature through a mobile phone app or with a laptop web interface. This will allow you to have the most versatile control over your temperature settings. The only other piece of equipment you'll need to make this ...


4

Sure -- or at least, there's nothing about having round ducts in the attic that would make A/C installation more difficult. In fact, because cold air is more dense than warm air, ceiling vents are usually considered better for cooling. The cool air flows down from the ceiling, helping ensure your rooms are evenly cooled. That's why many houses in warm ...


4

Sounds like a string of bad luck. While an electrical spike/surge will cause problems and failures in the controllers and motors, the freon exists in an enclosed system and therefore this will not cause a leak. The compressor is a hermetically sealed unit, so there are no shaft seals that will cause freon loss. The refrigerator is the most likely to have ...


4

According to Trane installation instructions, the technician is correct. They do require 3' of clear space in front of the control box. As for why the technician chose this orientation, I can only speculate. It looks to me like the access panel is on the corner of the unit, which would mean there has to be 3' clear space at the corner. Obviously the ...


4

On the AC side everything really needs to be changed R22 uses mineral oil based lubricants. R410a uses ester oil lubricants. Getting all the residue out would cost a bunch and these can’t be mixed. The compressor will need to be changed and the TXV / orifice will need to be changed. You might be able to have the evaporator cleaned (indoor coil) if it is in ...


4

Any way of circulating the air between the rooms will help, although I doubt you will be able to achieve uniform temperatures. Put the AC in the room that is hotter (e.g. has more windows) and then do the best you can with a fan or two. Also, make sure the AC is properly sized for the area you want to cool.


4

I'd suspect it's a secondary drain. It's possible that the main drain was simply overwhelmed, and the condensate level backed up to the point of the secondary drain. If it was really humid, a large volume of water could have been removed from the air. If the main drain is slow, it could have simply not been able to keep up. Without inspecting the system, ...


4

Generally, interior drywall is easier to repair than exterior wall treatments. You haven't stated what your wall is made of, in my area the norm is stucco over lath and paper; much more difficult to repair properly. I recommend an initial exploratory opening of the interior wall to assess damage and prospects for access and repair that way.


4

Sorry I don't have enough points to comment yet so have to put this reply in the answer. I had a vent coming out under the cabinets in the kitchen of my house for 20 years with NO PROBLEM (i.e. at the floor level where the kick-plate is). This wasn't even ductwork under the cabinet, but rather the vent exhausted into the frame under the cabinets, which ...


3

A few theories as to what might be going on: You have bad ductwork with few returns. If that's the case, you're just not moving enough air to dehumidify every room. Your AC unit is oversized. And oversized AC unit will cool the air very fast and then shut off. The problem with that is if the AC unit is only running for short periods, it's not given enough ...


3

The only technical reason that this isn't possible is that the coil needs a specific amount of air to flow through it when it's cooling. So to select the correct coil, you need to know the CFM of the air moving through the air handler. Not impossible to figure out or measure, but might not be easy for an air handler as old as yours. However, if I was a ...


3

The term you're looking for is "whole-house fan". It's a big fan that can blow outside air, inside. I have one in my house and they work very well for your use case. Be warned that whole-house fans are notoriously difficult to insulate and air-seal. When winter rolls around, the last thing you want is a huge hole in the side of your house through which ...


3

There is an optional add-on part for HVAC systems called an economizer. An HVAC economizer is a dampered vent designed to save energy and give the cooling system a break. Sensors within the economizer compare the outdoor temperature and humidity with that inside the building. –Google When you call for cooling, the unit decides if it needs to run the AC ...


3

First step is to convert those prices into something you can compare on equal footing. $0.063042/kWh = $17.50/GJ, for oil, $2/gal = $13.7/GJ So, superficially, oil is cheaper than electricity for the same amount of energy. However, there are a couple of other things to consider. Oil combustion is only about 75 - 90% efficient at heating because you have ...


3

The condition you describe is usually an indication that the compressor is unable to provide sufficient start torque to turn without drawing excessive amperage. This is frequently due to a weak run capacitor on the compressor. Less frequently this can be caused by a contactor in poor condition or an old compressor where the bearings have worn to the point ...


3

There are a multitude of blowers out there. The outside breaker you mention likely has no relation to this problem. The pipes are indeed freezing due to too little airflow. Here are the most likely causes and solutions for this: Assuming you have one of the most common PSC types (and not some other type like an ECM, slip induction, etc), then a weak run ...


3

Here are some potential downsides, besides cost (which is a big one): Can't have central air conditioning. How to heat the basement? I assume you plan on insulating under the PEX tubing to make most of the heat go through the floor. This makes it tough to heat the basement, if that's something you want. Will the warm floors be noticable? For well-insulated ...


3

If you have disconnected all external wires to the control board with only internal wires to the unit connected and the fuse still burns, that very likely indicates a failure of the board. With the fuse burning quickly, that often means a component in the power supply side of the board has catastrophically failed. To verify this, you could disconnect all ...


3

Thermostats utilize 24VAC, not DC. If you measure an AC voltage with a DC meter, it will show 0. I just noticed that ThreePhaseEel posted this answer 16 hours ago as a comment. He/she should get credit for the answer!


3

assumptions from what's in your photo: 1) it looks like the right side of the opening is your access, and the ducts are rigidly installed. 2) the crawlspace looks unheated, as the ducts seem to be insulated, and the fact that you mention radon must mean you have an actively vented (fan) crawlspace to evacuate any radon gas (along with a radon alarm in ...


3

A furnace only has a drain if it's a high efficiency condensing unit, or it contains an A/C evaporator coil. If it's an older non-high efficiency unit, and there's no integrated air conditioning. Then it probably won't have any type of drain.


3

I had my own "green" start up company that I sold off 10 years ago- and I use the same guys to install most new systems I put in. Really for most cases all the data will come back to is the average temperature that a home is kept (given that insulation and other thermal constraints are constant). Really the most effective thing to do is to always have ...


3

It depends on the home, and the system. Neither of which you've provided much information. Older homes are usually drafty enough to provide adequate combustion air, so dedicated intake are not required. Modern homes tend to be sealed up much tighter, and often require air intakes. Sometimes systems are installed in a utility closet, or other space where ...


3

The biggest culprit is likely environmental: your dry Colorado mountain air and low humidity. We have the same problem south of you in New Mexico. Raising your interior humidity will help a lot. There are several approaches, ranging from using a humidifier constantly (cheap up front, expensive to run over time) to sealing your house up airtight and using an ...



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