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11

After reviewing the spec sheet for the unit i have found that the LX series has a variable speed blower that will allow the unit to operate under low ambient conditions. Is specifies the system can operate down to 20 degrees. Anything below this and the system will not operate. If you do not have the LX unit and do have the standard, the. The unit is not ...


10

In theory this is what HVAC professionals are supposed to do. In practice, most of them rely on antiquated rules of thumb to size equipment and use existing ductwork, even if it has major problems. A certified energy rater is who you're looking for and who will be able to definitively tell you what you need to know, but you can learn a lot yourself to be a ...


8

Entirely apart from the high cost of electric resistance heat, (that is, regardless of heat source) a 1969 house is almost certainly going to benefit from insulation upgrades and the boring best bang-for the buck stuff nobody ever thinks is "fancy enough" to go for first - caulking, weatherstripping, and generally reducing air leakage. With the advent of ...


6

It does sound like the biggest opponent the AC is facing is the large picture window. I'm guessing it's just not a well insulated and/or not high-e glass and just letting too much heat in. For starters, close the internal blinds. If that isn't enough, consider some exterior blinds. These aren't terribly expensive and shouldn't be something that the landlord ...


5

The bigger issue is that if there are bedbugs in your apartment, the whole building is probably infested. Your best bet is probably to isolate yourself from the bedbugs and set a CO2 bedbug trap. Look into finding a new apartment.


5

Electric resistance heat is expensive, no way around it. Here are a couple of high-level things you can do to reduce your bill: Common sense: Stop using your fireplace (it's sucking more heat out of the house than it's adding. Free. Conservation: Turn down the heat and wear more clothes. Free. Efficiency: Improve your house's level of air sealing and ...


5

Do you have a budget in mind for adding the ac? You can use a water-cooled unit, but plan to spend $1500 and up. These units can be hooked up to a water supply (sink, garden hose, etc.) and drained back to a sink, outside, or wherever is available. The heat from the air is transferred to the water - much like a geothermal ac or heat pump works. We use these ...


4

I would guess that modifying the duct work in a 1920s masonry construction home will be prohibitively destructive and involving removing or damaging irreplaceable trim that contributes to the building's character. Mini split heat pumps: An alternative, which will not be inexpensive but may be significantly less destructive, would be investigating ...


4

i would suggest having an HVAC contractor visit to examine all of your ductwork. My guess would be there are wholes, gaps, or rips in the ducts whereupon the system in operation is pulling the dust in from wall cavities, basement or attic (depending on where the ductwork runs). Once the contractor (or yourself) seals up and/or replaces any ductwork then ...


4

If the steel door is of a standard size, see what it would cost to buy another door of the same size. Then ask the landlord if you can replace it with your own door, and cut a hole in that. In the optimal case this would just require lifting the old door off the hinges and the new door in its place. At most you have to unscrew the hinges and move the lock ...


4

It should be fine. Air conditioners remove heat and dump it outside; sounds like the heat got dumped into the cover. Remove the cover, let the unit cool down, and don't do it again. If it stops working, call a service tech.


4

If the camp has internet access, you may want to look into a WIFI-controlled thermostat. Most allow you to remotely monitor and control the temperature through a mobile phone app or with a laptop web interface. This will allow you to have the most versatile control over your temperature settings. The only other piece of equipment you'll need to make this ...


3

It is not expected to work, but it might. Many modern compressors have interlocks that prevent them coming on in too-low temperatures. If there's no interlock or heating element, you could also damage or destroy your compressor if you turn it on at too-low temperatures. This is because it is possible to pull liquid rather than gaseous refrigerant into the ...


3

Reducing drafts are the first place to start. It's your best return on your investment. (as others have said already) The test to do is a "Blower door test". I did one myself with a fairly powerful fan, some plywood and a window. I think I can get my hands on a thermal imaging camera from a friend, but so far I've been able to detect leaks fairly easily ...


3

One option would be "low-volume, high-velocity" ducted system (manufacturers include SpacePak and Unico) that uses a series of small 2" diameter ducts to distribute air. Depending on the size of your joists, 2" holes may be acceptable. As @Ecnerwal mentioned, mini-splits can be a good option too.


3

You can either cap the wire with a twist-on wire connector (or similar device), or clip the uninsulated portion of the wire off. Once the uninsulated portion of the wire is covered, you can just tuck it away. To be extra safe, you can disconnect the other end of the wire from the furnace.


3

If your basement is already mostly comfortable without the problematic supplemental furnace and its ducts, why not spend the money on properly insulating the basement instead? That way it will likely be all the way comfortable when heated from the heat of the main furnace, and then you can fully abandon and/or remove the redundant furnace and have lower ...


3

I'll bet you can take a piece of OSB, cut it just smaller than the jamb of the door, put some pipe insulation around it, and make a press-to-fit door. Cut a vent in the middle, hook up the AC hose and you're done. It will only work when you are there. Idea 2 - move involved. Open the door so there is a gap of about 8". Now build a frame around the door as ...


3

Unless you are an abnormally equipped layman, no. Even then, there may be a legal requirement (depending where you are) for this to be done by a licensed A/C service person, as regulations around refrigerants have become much more stringent over the years, trying to limit uncontrolled releases to atmosphere.


3

A/C Refrigerant Line Set Those are the refrigerant lines (what I would call Freon lines) that feed the condenser (the thing outside; half of a split system. The other half is the coil inside your furnace's plenum chamber). The big one (cold) is the suction line. The small one is the liquid line (hot; no need for insulation). Both of these lines run all ...


3

If you have a set of gauges, you should connect them at the condensing unit and measure the pressures in the refrigerant lines. If you don't have a set of gauges, you should contact somebody who does. Troubleshooting and repairing A/C units requires special tools, without them you can only speculate as to what the problem is. If I had to speculate, I'd ...


3

There is some additional easy trouble-shooting you can do yourself. Check temperature at the vents: Get a little thermometer. Put it right on or just inside one of the air vents so that it's getting the full effect of the air temp coming out of the vents. The air should be about 20 degrees cooler than ambient in your house. So, if your house is 75, the air ...


3

Disconnects are required when the equipment is too far from, or not within sight of the breaker (or branch circuit disconnect) (commonly known as "Serviceman disconnects" or "Serviceman switches"). This is required so that while you're working on the equipment, it's less likely somebody will accidentally energize the equipment (flip the breaker on). ...


3

The apartment is gaining more heat throughout the day than the AC is able to remove. Unfortunately, as a renter, there isn't much you can do about this. The real solution is to improve the building's insulation, plant shade trees, replace old windows with Low-E ones, add radiant barriers, etc. But all of those options would lie with the landlord, not you, ...


3

In addition to DA01's excellent answer, here are a few more suggestions that may give you enough minor improvements to prevent having to upgrade your A/C system. Be sure that the output vents in all rooms are all the way open, and open the interior doors of every room with an output vent (though opening doors may be less important if each room has its own ...


3

A few theories as to what might be going on: You have bad ductwork with few returns. If that's the case, you're just not moving enough air to dehumidify every room. Your AC unit is oversized. And oversized AC unit will cool the air very fast and then shut off. The problem with that is if the AC unit is only running for short periods, it's not given enough ...


3

The only technical reason that this isn't possible is that the coil needs a specific amount of air to flow through it when it's cooling. So to select the correct coil, you need to know the CFM of the air moving through the air handler. Not impossible to figure out or measure, but might not be easy for an air handler as old as yours. However, if I was a ...


3

The term you're looking for is "whole-house fan". It's a big fan that can blow outside air, inside. I have one in my house and they work very well for your use case. Be warned that whole-house fans are notoriously difficult to insulate and air-seal. When winter rolls around, the last thing you want is a huge hole in the side of your house through which ...


3

First step is to convert those prices into something you can compare on equal footing. $0.063042/kWh = $17.50/GJ, for oil, $2/gal = $13.7/GJ So, superficially, oil is cheaper than electricity for the same amount of energy. However, there are a couple of other things to consider. Oil combustion is only about 75 - 90% efficient at heating because you have ...


3

The condition you describe is usually an indication that the compressor is unable to provide sufficient start torque to turn without drawing excessive amperage. This is frequently due to a weak run capacitor on the compressor. Less frequently this can be caused by a contactor in poor condition or an old compressor where the bearings have worn to the point ...



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