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12

Sounds like a classic compromised leg of your main service. This problem could be anywhere from the connections at the utility transformer on the pole, to the connection taps on the side of the house, to the meter pan, to the main breaker. IMO this is NOT something for a DIY to troubleshoot since you would need to be testing live unfused wires in places ...


11

After reviewing the spec sheet for the unit i have found that the LX series has a variable speed blower that will allow the unit to operate under low ambient conditions. Is specifies the system can operate down to 20 degrees. Anything below this and the system will not operate. If you do not have the LX unit and do have the standard, the. The unit is not ...


8

You need a duct crimper like this to reduce the diameter of the end of one piece of duct: Run the tool around the end of the duct so that you have multiple parallel crimps. That piece should slide right into the uncrimped piece, giving you a secure connection to tape. If you don't want to spring for a dedicated tool, I've seen where people use ...


8

Entirely apart from the high cost of electric resistance heat, (that is, regardless of heat source) a 1969 house is almost certainly going to benefit from insulation upgrades and the boring best bang-for the buck stuff nobody ever thinks is "fancy enough" to go for first - caulking, weatherstripping, and generally reducing air leakage. With the advent of ...


6

You may be able to rig up something whether the compressor-side air intake and exhaust are piped outside, but the efficiency will be low and you may risk burning out the compressor by working it too hard. If you want something you can install in a small opening, you might consider wheeled portable AC units which come with a flexible duct. If you're still ...


6

Can you do this? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! Aside from (likely multiple) code violations you will never filter the lint out and will create a dangerous situation inside the furnace plenum, aside from clogging the furnace filter probably weekly.


5

You'll want to check with your local government. The sale of a house often requires some things to be brought up to current code. What things are required, depends on the local government. For example. In my area, sump pumps are required. If you're selling a house without a sump, you'll have to install one before you can close. A nearby area requires ...


5

The bigger issue is that if there are bedbugs in your apartment, the whole building is probably infested. Your best bet is probably to isolate yourself from the bedbugs and set a CO2 bedbug trap. Look into finding a new apartment.


5

Electric resistance heat is expensive, no way around it. Here are a couple of high-level things you can do to reduce your bill: Common sense: Stop using your fireplace (it's sucking more heat out of the house than it's adding. Free. Conservation: Turn down the heat and wear more clothes. Free. Efficiency: Improve your house's level of air sealing and ...


4

I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


4

This conference presentation (PDF) seems to lay out the process fairly well. It also mentions a few resources that go into more detailed calculations and considerations. The Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association has an overview guide available here (PDF) for improving efficiency. They also have entire standards available for ...


4

You can seal the hole with duct seal. It is a putty-like substance, which can fill the hole around the pipes. Duct seal does not harden, so it is easy to remove in the future. You may have to cut the pipe insulation just short of the hole so you get a good seal. It may be a good time to replace that whole section of insulation while you're working in the ...


4

I'm not a HVAC expert but a 5 ton unit sounds pretty large for a 3000sqft house. You can probably approach this in one of two ways. One is probably what the previous owner did and just throw more cooling capacity at the problem (two units, larger units, etc.). Alternatively, you can start looking at ways to get more out of your existing unit. Some things ...


4

Depends on location but 50-55 degrees Fahrenheit is fairly standard.


4

This is definitely an issue with one of the legs of your main service. This pops up most commonly when the temperatures outside start to change and cause the wires to contract or expand. The power coming in to your house is normally fed by two separate wires, if one of these has become loose, you will see issues on about half the circuits in the house.


4

The dryer vent and the combustion vent are one and the same. If you try to use the dryer vent for heating you will have two issues, first excess moisture and second carbon monoxide. Gas dryers get their efficiency by directly venting the combustion into the damp clothes which then by the way of evaporation drastically reduces the temp of the heat. It ...


4

I would guess that modifying the duct work in a 1920s masonry construction home will be prohibitively destructive and involving removing or damaging irreplaceable trim that contributes to the building's character. Mini split heat pumps: An alternative, which will not be inexpensive but may be significantly less destructive, would be investigating ...


3

Yes. I was building a new home in Baytown Texas (completed in 2006) and searched far and wide for thermostat controlled dampers - was told by many HVAC companies that "they" remove them weekly - this isn't true. I found one installer in Houston that would do the system the way I suggested - he listened and so did I. We compromised on 2 units with 3 ...


3

Red, here's a diagram that shows airflow in a furnace:


3

The problem with adding humidity to a leaky home is amount of water vapor air can hold varies significantly with temperature. While 30% relative humidity at 72°F seems dry and harmless in and of itself if you cool this same air to 38°F (let alone -10°F it sometimes get) all of the sudden you have reached 100% RH. The difficulty is making sure ...


3

These vents are for a high efficiency furnace. One brings in fresh air for combustion, the other exhausts air after combustion. It's separate from the air you breath in your home, hence the high efficiency part. The biggest concerns with these are venting exhaust too close to a window, and having the exhaust sucked back into the intake, but this shouldn't be ...


3

The suction line (the larger pipe) should never be iced up during normal operation. By the time the refrigerant gets to the end of the evaporator coil, it should be completely boiled off (in a gas state). The bottom few coils may frost up, but the top ones should only be sweating at most. If the suction line; or more than the bottom third of the coil, ...


3

First, be wary of the two big capacitors. One is the large "beer-can"-shaped component against the inside wall of the enclosure, and the other is the smaller, silver oval-shaped can right next to it. These can hold electrical charge, and could hurt you. You'll want make sure that they're discharged. Once you unplug the unit, wait a few minutes for the ...


3

Is there a small switch somewhere n the thermostat that says something like "fan" and has positions for "auto" and "on"? Is it in the "On" position? If what you mean is that the fan keeps blowing when the thermostat is not calling for cooling (but the air at that point is not being cooled) that could be it. Otherwise, look for a short circuit in the ...


3

What you’re describing sounds like a combination of negative pressure in the compartment that the drain pan connected to and an incorrectly sized p-trap on the condensate drain. The depth of the t-prap has to be greater than the negative pressure in inches of water column of the compartment where the drain is connected to. A t-prap with insufficient depth, ...


3

The capacitor needs replacement. While it is possible there is a circuitry problem causing the capacitor to overheat (and thus fail like this), it is also possible it was simply time for this electrolytic capacitor to fail while nothing else is wrong. See this photo for a similar failure mode.


3

If the vent pipes are made of iron based metal or any covered over grate is made of similar material you could go hunting with a magnet.


3

It is not expected to work, but it might. Many modern compressors have interlocks that prevent them coming on in too-low temperatures. If there's no interlock or heating element, you could also damage or destroy your compressor if you turn it on at too-low temperatures. This is because it is possible to pull liquid rather than gaseous refrigerant into the ...


3

Reducing drafts are the first place to start. It's your best return on your investment. (as others have said already) The test to do is a "Blower door test". I did one myself with a fairly powerful fan, some plywood and a window. I think I can get my hands on a thermal imaging camera from a friend, but so far I've been able to detect leaks fairly easily ...


3

One option would be "low-volume, high-velocity" ducted system (manufacturers include SpacePak and Unico) that uses a series of small 2" diameter ducts to distribute air. Depending on the size of your joists, 2" holes may be acceptable. As @Ecnerwal mentioned, mini-splits can be a good option too.



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