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I think you'd end up running into a whole boat load of issues before you could even begin talking about efficiency. The first and most pressing being the rapid condensation that would occur within seconds of circulating the cold liquid (leaving you with a whole host of other DIY problems you'd need to work out). Which, I imagine would need to be somewhere ...


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As written this question is pretty hard to answer. It sounds like you're having AC problems tho and need a test method. Find or purchase 2 probe type thermometers like thermometers. Analog or digital doesn't matter, the only things that are important are that they have a probe and that they give the same reading laying next to each other on a table (you ...


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The voltage needs to be the same, and the VA needs to be greater or equal to what you have now. If your transformer is 40VA and you replace with 60VA, that is fine. I would stay within parts intended for use in HVAC units. Electronics supply houses will happily sell you 24VAC transformers, but they may not be listed (certified) for HVAC use. Anyway, ...


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Do you maybe have a steam humidifier on the furnace? If it was wired incorrectly or was damaged it could be trying to heat water when the furnace is not running, or when no water was present in the boiler. How confident are you on the diagnosis of the electrical issues? I've heard of underground feeders upstream of the breaker panel becoming damaged and ...


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Dew point below coil temperature. Plugged condensate drain. Coil temperature below freezing (0°C/32°F).


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Condensate is a byproduct of air conditioning, which is created when moisture in the air condenses on the cold evaporator coils. There are two situations where an air conditioner would not generate condensate. If there's no moisture in the air, then there's nothing to condense out of the air. If the coils are not cold enough (below the dew point), the ...


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You'd need a closed system with a serious dose of antifreeze to get cold enough for significant cooling. Radiators usually run at least 40C above the desired room temperature to provide heat. To get the same amount of heat transfer into the radiators for cooling, the circulating water would have to be as cold as a freezer (-20C). Possibly by running 24 ...


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It's an intriguing question. On one hand, trapped air is heated through radiation. On the other, it acts as an insulator. Keep in mind that we aren't talking about airflow, but heat flow (by conduction, convection, and radiation). The answer probably depends on how many of your windows are exposed to the sun, where extreme temperatures are generated ...



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