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4

I'd suspect it's a secondary drain. It's possible that the main drain was simply overwhelmed, and the condensate level backed up to the point of the secondary drain. If it was really humid, a large volume of water could have been removed from the air. If the main drain is slow, it could have simply not been able to keep up. Without inspecting the system, ...


4

Any way of circulating the air between the rooms will help, although I doubt you will be able to achieve uniform temperatures. Put the AC in the room that is hotter (e.g. has more windows) and then do the best you can with a fan or two. Also, make sure the AC is properly sized for the area you want to cool.


4

On the AC side everything really needs to be changed R22 uses mineral oil based lubricants. R410a uses ester oil lubricants. Getting all the residue out would cost a bunch and these can’t be mixed. The compressor will need to be changed and the TXV / orifice will need to be changed. You might be able to have the evaporator cleaned (indoor coil) if it is in ...


3

Sounds like contactor chatter. Could be a bad contactor, or not enough power on the coil. Basically, the contactor is closing and opening really quickly. This happens when the coil doesn't create a strong enough magnetic field to hold the contactor closed. Depending on the cost of a new contactor, I'd probably just pop in a new one. If it doesn't fix the ...


3

Most of the motors associated with fans and such, utilize an induced magnetic field, and don't have a permanent magnet. So as the capacitor releases its charge (quickly), a magnetic field would be induced in the motor and cause the motor to turn maybe once or twice, and that should spend most, if not all, of the the stored charge. So the capacitor will ...


2

Sounds like a blown compressor. Bad contacters don't usually pop fuses. And if it was simply the fan not coming on, the compressor should trip its own over-heat, not your breakers (unless it's old and grumpy: same prognosis; dead compressor). If I were to keep trying to fix at that unit, the first thing I would do is install a "fused" (circuit breaker) ...


2

Sounds suspiciously like your A/C lacks a suitable time-delay relay to prevent rapid on/off cycling, which is generally a bad thing (and why those are usually included.) In short, when you "flipped off" the A/C circuit breaker, you should have waited 3-5 minutes before flipping it on again (or the system should have waited that long before attempting to ...


1

Here it is thanks. A return duct will help the air flow into the room when the door is closed. Up sizing the supply and dampers to to help provide more flow may also help. In my last home I had 2 dampers that I adjusted 1 for up stairs and 1 for down. More air to the upstairs in summer when it was cold and more down in the winter when the heat was on. Since ...


1

If the lines are two small it will change the efficiency and work the compressor harder. It is tough to fully clean the old mineral oil out that was used in older units. If the R410 smells acidic this could be an indication that the old oil was still in the system and mineral oil and ester oil don't mix. If there is old oil in the system this can cause early ...


1

ECM Motor Troubleshooting –yorkcentraltechtalk Troubleshooting the ECM motor can be very simple if you just remember that it's not just ON or OFF. There are basically 4 problems that will not allow the motor to run: There is no input power to the motor controller (high voltage input). There is improper or no communication to the motor (low voltage ...


1

HVAC transformers are commonly rated 24 volts, 40 volt-amperes (VA). So they should be capable of providing about 1.6 amperes. 40 VA ÷ 24 V = 1.666666 A However, the amount of current flowing, depends on what load is connected. If the load is only drawing 5 mA, then only 5 mA will flow on the wire.


1

Since you have an air handler and not a furnace -- I bet W does nothing whatsoever. Unhook that wire from W and connect it to COM 24V at the furnace end, then use it as your C wire for the new 'stat. And yes, the cable from Y and COM that follows the refrigerant line goes to the condenser unit outside.


1

Run a new cable with at least five conductors. Connect a wire between COM 24V, and the C terminal on the thermostat. The cable that connects to Y and COM 24V, goes out to the outdoor unit. If the indoor unit only blows air, and doesn't add heat. It's called an air handler.


1

It's a waste of money to try. Especially if you're the guy who pays for the electricity. Captain Kirk didn't beam the Freon out. First, you'll want to fix your Freon leak. After all, air conditioners are generally sealed units, with only electrical wires entering the envelope that contains freon. However, they use a lot of aluminum, as it is a superb ...


1

Air conditioners do not magically lose refrigerant. If refrigerant is missing, the air-conditioner leaks; if the leak is not fixed, it will continue to leak. A window unit is almost always a bad economic choice to attempt repairs on rather than replacement; since USA-based persons DO need a license to handle refrigerants, and anyone world-wide needs ...


1

That sounds about right. It usually takes 5-15 minutes for me to fill 1 lb.


1

When you asked to increase the blower, what you are really asking to do is increase the fan speed (amount of air), right? You could ask the the tech to check/verify that you are getting 1600 CFM (cubic feet per minute) and if you truly are, and if that's not enough, ask them if it is possible to increase it (it might be adjustable). But I am thinking that ...


1

An HVAC technician should be able to repair the line, assuming the rest of the line is in good shape. Refrigerant line repair is not a diy project, as it requires specialized tools and training, as well as a license in most places. After the leak is repaired, you'll have to recharge the system. Which also is not a project for a typical diyer.


1

Inside the unit, you should find a transformer. On the secondary side of the transformer (low voltage side) you should see a red wire attached to one terminal, and blue attached to the other. The terminal with the blue wire will also have a green with yellow strip wire, which attaches to the chassis. The blue wire is the C wire. Using a ...


1

This type of failure is fairly common, and usually doesn't cause too much collateral damage, if caught quickly. If you want to attempt the work yourself, it is fairly straightforward as you describe. You'll likely have to source the replacement blade from a local HVAC company, or the internet. You'll also have to balance the blade, so that it doesn't ...


1

I was able to easily open the plate dampers with Vise Grip Pliers. The locking mechanism on the Vise Grip is great. As Ed Beal stated in his comment, I think replacing the damper is a good solution because it 1) saves time looking for an obscure part and 2) manual dampers are not too expensive.


1

Not being level can cause the oil for the compressor to not lubricate correctly. Over time it will cause the compressor to burn out costing you lots of $ in the long run.


1

I just had this exact issue. I called the HVAC emergency service number and the technician called me back. He advised to unscrew the bottom of the kill switch or float. There is a yellow wire that leads to it. Once I drained all the water ,the system turned on instantly. Hope that helps.


1

208/120Y is cheaper for supplying condominiums because one neutral can carry the unbalanced loads of three ungrounded conductors. But for the consumer, the voltages difference of 208V vs 240V usually equates to the same overall wattage, with the only negligible concern being it takes longer for heating elements to reach their desired temperature. As for ...


1

Volts x Amperage=Wattage I have a 220 volt device (motor, dryer whatever... it makes little difference for this example). Single phase device draws 43 amps (43 x 220 = ~ 9460 Watts or 9.5 KW) Same unit with 3 phase draws 25 amps (25 x 220 =~ 5500 Watts or 5.5 KW) *** The same amount of work is output with either unit despite the 3 phase using less power ...


1

Gotta love armchair quarterbacks. I live in the Caribbean. Houses are constructed of concrete block with stucco/parging covering the block. Roofs are usually terracotta tile or concrete tiles. Very few dwellings have an attic space to separate the exterior roof from the interior roof and insulation is a word that hasn't yet been defined here. Concrete stores ...



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