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This problem can be multi-faceted. Someone could guess all day long as to what the problem(s) is / are and not even come close. Air conditioning isn't something to guess at. It's like having a rattle on a car and taking the approach of replacing one part at a time to find the rattle. It would be cheaper to just buy a new car. ( I give that as an example you ...


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You can't. I have the same problem. My house has a 125,000 BTU furnace for a 25,000 BTU heat load. My solution? I set the thermostat at 69 and turn it on manually when the temperature falls below 65 or so. This ensures that the furnace runs for a nice long time when it's on, and then stays off the rest of the time. But you don't really even need to do this ...


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No. You may risk damaging your unit by running it in cooling mode when it is too cold out (although some systems have safeties around this), but heating in low temperatures should not damage the system. No. A correctly functioning heat pump should not ever drop below 100% efficiency. This is dependent upon the specific heat pump model. Often, manufacturers ...


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It depends on the home, and the system. Neither of which you've provided much information. Older homes are usually drafty enough to provide adequate combustion air, so dedicated intake are not required. Modern homes tend to be sealed up much tighter, and often require air intakes. Sometimes systems are installed in a utility closet, or other space where ...


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Yes, you can plumb the outlet of the condensate pump into the tailpiece of the shower. Assuming the condensate line is properly trapped, then there should be no problem. You'll notice in the code snippet below, that it says "If discharged into the drainage system, equipment shall drain by means of an indirect waste pipe.". Which means you cannot, plumb the ...


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Since this appears to be a plumbing leak, the fix is to shutoff the water, drain it as best you can, cut out the bad section, and solder in a replacement section. The whole process is maybe a 30 minute job and will be much more permanent than any patch you attempt to apply. A pinhole leak in one place may just be the first sign of the entire section of pipe ...


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Based on the ladder diagram, it looks like the R terminal is only energized when all the limits (main limit and however many rollout limits there are) are closed. So if any of the limits open, the thermostat loses power (maybe). I can't say for sure; since I'm not familiar with that board, but if that's how the furnace disables itself during a problem. ...


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A hand held anemometer can be used to see the flow then multiply by area to get the total flow. There are quite a few for under 20$ .


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Limits are only designed to open when there's a problem, so the first step here is to find out what the problem is and fix it. The most common cause for a high limit to continually trip, is a dirty or improperly installed return air filter. Make sure you change the filter regularly, and that you're using one with a similar density to the one recommended ...


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Does this furnace have a condensate drain? I had a similar problem with a high-efficiency gas furnace, and the problem turned out to be a gummed up condensate trap. I disconnected the hose from the front end of the trap, and about a quart of water poured out of the drain line. I removed the trap, flushed it with water for about 5 minutes, reconnected, and ...


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It sounds like the switch is sticking, which is a sign that it's time to swap it out. Before you do, though, make sure the exhaust and condensate drain aren't blocked/restricted. $25 is a fairly cheap test, unless you have a gauge on hand to check the pressure.


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Water spraying from the copper pipe in your photo would indicate a 3/4 inch copper potable water pipe. This can be repaired with only basic plumbing and pipe sweating skills. It may be simpler to use solder rather than brazing copper rod. Either is acceptable, but since you asked about brazing I will answer that first. You will need a Mapp gas torch with a ...


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After looking at the photo, I'm guessing that's not a refrigerant line. If it was, liquid would not be coming out. Follow the pipe, and find out where each end terminates. That will help you determine what this pipe is for. You do not do this yourself, unless of course you have the equipment, training, and licence to do so. Before you fix the leak, you'll ...


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Temporarily turn off the power to the condensing unit to be certain it's not running at times. You should have a breaker for it in your electrical panel, or a local disconnect box mounted near the condenser itself. If it's a heat pump the insulated line may freeze for short times normally or if the switchover valve is stuck for longer times.


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Cut the gas back some by slightly closing the gas valve (the one on the pipe, not in the unit), however be prepared to have to reset the furnace occasionally if your local gas pressure drops intermittently. Watch the flames as you do it. Just, "take the edge off". This will cost you more in electricity, as it'll run longer to come up to temp, but it will ...


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If partially closing a single supply vent caused your high limit to trip you probably have an restriction problem. I would recommend investigating a bypass damper with a return and supply temp. sensor. These devices are typically just a part of a whole house zoning system, but can be used to easily resolve supply air restrictions in situations where ...


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Call your gas supplier. ( I'm assuming you have gas piped to you house, and not using propane tanks.) As I found out when I moved from a flat region to one with hills, the gas company comes around a few times a year to check the pressure in the line. It could be your pressure needs adjusting. I also like the negative pressure answer. As an aside, I ...


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A healthy home pulls in air, circulates it, and releases it. You have negative pressure when you are releasing more air than you are pulling in. This could be caused by a blocked intake or an over-working exhaust system. The most common, for a stove, would be a vent hood pulling too much air from your home than it can pull in to keep the fire going (see ...


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The amount of heat going out of your house has to be made up by your heating system. When its cooler inside(winter) there is less temperature difference from inside to outside and therefore less pressure to move heat out. Therefore heat loss is lower. Looking at run times and saying savings are uncertain is disingenuous at best, except on a heat pump. ...


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I had a similar issue and could have sworn it was mechanical/electrical. I had a service man come in and he removed the air filter from the handler. It started right up afterwards (i am unsure if there was a reset switch he had to trip). He mentioned that my air handler will shut off if there is a great enough pressure difference between the supply and ...


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I had the problem here in NE Ohio. Had the ancient furnace replaced with a energy efficient one. The guys installed it, took the old drain line and reconnected my new furnace to it. The frigid cold weather arrived and bingo, came home to a wet carpet and the condensation pump screaming up a storm. I do not have a drain next to the furnace. Well, I called ...


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Have you attempted to use general house cleaning products like Baking Soda? We use this when we are removing odors from homes we are remodeling. It does take a little time but it works pretty good. We typically will put a number of boxes around the home so we get good coverage. This has helped us remove cat urine odors, cigar smoke and other less than ...



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