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11

After reviewing the spec sheet for the unit i have found that the LX series has a variable speed blower that will allow the unit to operate under low ambient conditions. Is specifies the system can operate down to 20 degrees. Anything below this and the system will not operate. If you do not have the LX unit and do have the standard, the. The unit is not ...


8

Entirely apart from the high cost of electric resistance heat, (that is, regardless of heat source) a 1969 house is almost certainly going to benefit from insulation upgrades and the boring best bang-for the buck stuff nobody ever thinks is "fancy enough" to go for first - caulking, weatherstripping, and generally reducing air leakage. With the advent of ...


6

Can you do this? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! Aside from (likely multiple) code violations you will never filter the lint out and will create a dangerous situation inside the furnace plenum, aside from clogging the furnace filter probably weekly.


5

The bigger issue is that if there are bedbugs in your apartment, the whole building is probably infested. Your best bet is probably to isolate yourself from the bedbugs and set a CO2 bedbug trap. Look into finding a new apartment.


5

Electric resistance heat is expensive, no way around it. Here are a couple of high-level things you can do to reduce your bill: Common sense: Stop using your fireplace (it's sucking more heat out of the house than it's adding. Free. Conservation: Turn down the heat and wear more clothes. Free. Efficiency: Improve your house's level of air sealing and ...


4

I would guess that modifying the duct work in a 1920s masonry construction home will be prohibitively destructive and involving removing or damaging irreplaceable trim that contributes to the building's character. Mini split heat pumps: An alternative, which will not be inexpensive but may be significantly less destructive, would be investigating ...


3

Reducing drafts are the first place to start. It's your best return on your investment. (as others have said already) The test to do is a "Blower door test". I did one myself with a fairly powerful fan, some plywood and a window. I think I can get my hands on a thermal imaging camera from a friend, but so far I've been able to detect leaks fairly easily ...


3

One option would be "low-volume, high-velocity" ducted system (manufacturers include SpacePak and Unico) that uses a series of small 2" diameter ducts to distribute air. Depending on the size of your joists, 2" holes may be acceptable. As @Ecnerwal mentioned, mini-splits can be a good option too.


3

It is not expected to work, but it might. Many modern compressors have interlocks that prevent them coming on in too-low temperatures. If there's no interlock or heating element, you could also damage or destroy your compressor if you turn it on at too-low temperatures. This is because it is possible to pull liquid rather than gaseous refrigerant into the ...


2

It could be an intake. Furnaces require combustion air, which can only be taken from certain sources. If the furnace is in a utility closet (or surrounded by living space), the pipe could be supplying combustion air. If this is the case, it cannot be removed. Without more detail, it's impossible to definitively answer this question.


2

You should have a meeting with your contractor and the HVAC contractor, and have them explain exactly what's going on. Ask them to show you whatever calculations they're using to determine the equipment size, and have them explain how a single unit can replace two units. It's possible that they're installing a larger single unit, to eliminate the need for ...


2

I dont think you will be able to effectively heat the room to 140 deg. The main problem is Insulation. Escaped heat: Your room is probably not insulated for the cold (as much as some other climates). so internally heating your room may require a large amount of source heat since much will escape. Insulation from Room Components: items such as beds, wall ...


2

The quick answer is that the humidifier/vaporizer causes the orange flame. This happened to us a couple of weeks ago. The gas company said they would send over a technician. He called us first to confirm our orange flame. He asked if we recently turned on a humidifier/vaporizer. We had. We shut it off and things went back to normal in an hour or so. I ...


2

You could put in a non-forced air heating system - ie, hydronic or radiant, using water in pipes to deliver heat. You could use mini-splits for A/C only or for heat and A/C. You only need space for ducts if you need ducts, and there are plenty of houses without ducts... Edit: you may be able to work with a wide, shallow duct so you can have a broad, not too ...


2

Mini-splits have many advantages, so tossing them out wholesale is a somewhat puzzling response to a house with limited options for running ducts. If you don't like beige plastic boxes (who does, really?) there are several versions that are made to be visually unobtrusive, with the inside unit concealed in a picture frame, or a small inside unit that can be ...


2

You can either cap the wire with a twist-on wire connector (or similar device), or clip the uninsulated portion of the wire off. Once the uninsulated portion of the wire is covered, you can just tuck it away. To be extra safe, you can disconnect the other end of the wire from the furnace.


1

It's likely not connected to anything. If you go to the furnace, you'll likely see the cable that goes to the thermostat. You'll also likely see the brown wire either wrapped around the cable, or just not connected to anything.


1

Without seeing the layout of the house, materials, etc., and its external environment—trees, exterior finishes, etc.—all I can do is speak in generalities. Cooling By providing adequate cooling upstairs, downstairs—especially with an open stairway—should need minimal targeted cooling. It might be sufficient to mostly close ...


1

Given that those are very distinctive smells, the items mentioned are probably in the heating unit. Possibly as part of some animals's nest, if you don't have small children who might have put them there...might want to open it up and clear them out before you have a fire.


1

Sounds to me like you need the system balanced. A common issue in all homes new or old is that the thermostat satisfies before the upper floor is properly conditioned. Another issue is that normally the main-floor return air is located near or under the thermostat. I would recommend getting damper-able registers for the entire main floor, and especially the ...


1

Replacing the tank eliminates the most common suspects, although it is conceivably possible that you've just had terrible luck and there's a similar issue with the new tank as well. You can test the capacity of your water heater using this procedure, filling buckets with hot water and measuring the temperature to see how much you can draw down before it gets ...


1

Since efficiency is your concern, why don't you install a geothermal system? There are geothermal split systems (example) that are designed to use very little space indoors.


1

You might be able to do it yourself. Google for "service instructions <brand and model>" of the furnace to determine where the limit switch is located. With power disconnected, open the necessary panel(s) to assess whether it is something you would be comfortable doing. It may require removal of the blower assembly and/or reaching past sharp and ...


1

Your basement return air should have a damper installed which should allow you to restrict the amount of air drawn in by it. If your house is older it may not have this however in all newer homes this damper is installed by the ductwork installers. If it is not it is not very hard to add one. The damper is slightly smaller than the opening of the return ...


1

AKA: Dirty Sock Syndrome (paraphrased), caused by the growth of mold and bacteria on the coil. Heat pumps (central HVAC) are particularly susceptible because, unlike conventional heat exchangers, their heating cycles are not hot enough to kill the microbes that thrive on their wet coils during the cooling season. Instead, the temperature is just warm enough ...


1

Same thing my the system in my house. Uses a MERV 16 5". Smell was the filter itself. Dont know what it picked up, but it was generating its own odor. Whew ! I think it started after I baked a beef roast. which smoked a bit when in the oven. Maybe something in rhe meat ?



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