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4

If the camp has internet access, you may want to look into a WIFI-controlled thermostat. Most allow you to remotely monitor and control the temperature through a mobile phone app or with a laptop web interface. This will allow you to have the most versatile control over your temperature settings. The only other piece of equipment you'll need to make this ...


4

It does sound like the biggest opponent the AC is facing is the large picture window. I'm guessing it's just not a well insulated and/or not high-e glass and just letting too much heat in. For starters, close the internal blinds. If that isn't enough, consider some exterior blinds. These aren't terribly expensive and shouldn't be something that the landlord ...


3

The apartment is gaining more heat throughout the day than the AC is able to remove. Unfortunately, as a renter, there isn't much you can do about this. The real solution is to improve the building's insulation, plant shade trees, replace old windows with Low-E ones, add radiant barriers, etc. But all of those options would lie with the landlord, not you, ...


3

Disconnects are required when the equipment is too far from, or not within sight of the breaker (or branch circuit disconnect) (commonly known as "Serviceman disconnects" or "Serviceman switches"). This is required so that while you're working on the equipment, it's less likely somebody will accidentally energize the equipment (flip the breaker on). ...


2

In addition to DA01's excellent answer, here are a few more suggestions that may give you enough minor improvements to prevent having to upgrade your A/C system. Be sure that the output vents in all rooms are all the way open, and open the interior doors of every room with an output vent (though opening doors may be less important if each room has its own ...


2

Nice chart. This looks like abnormally frequent triggering of the defrost cycle. Typically this will occur if the unit is severely low on charge or when the outdoor thermostatic expansion valve (TEV) has failed and is restricting flow of refrigerant through the outdoor coil so severely that the coil freezes in an abnormally short period of time, triggering ...


2

Any area that contains water lines should be heated if temps hit freezing where you live. Crawl spaces without insulation should also be heated in these climates particularly if you have non-carpeted floors above them to avoid cold floors in the winter. Also, I'm not an HVAC expert, but I've been told you should condition the air through which uninsulated ...


2

Assuming the question is why can't your AC keep your home cooler, there are several possibilities: The AC is low on refrigerant, look for a temperature difference of 14-20°F between the return and vents to see if the unit is cooling efficiently. If you're low, you will likely need to call a professional to pressurize the system and check for any leaks. ...


2

Depending on your location, it would likely be more economical to open the house up and circulate air with fans to bring down the trapped heat and then turn on the AC. It won't be cool when you arrive, but it will become tolerable very quickly. If air conditioning is required, and you have some sort of network connectivity, I'd look into home automation. ...


1

There's a couple questions that have to be answered, before you'll know for sure if there's a problem or not. First is if there's any combustion appliances in the closet (e.g. gas furnace)? If there are, they'll need to draw combustion air from somewhere. Which leads to the second question, is there a duct to draw combustion air from the outside into the ...


1

If you want anything close to an accurate answer. You're going to have to tell us a bit more about the wiring between the thermostat and the furnace, or include some photos of the wiring. And include make, and model numbers for all the equipment involved. Most furnaces manage the blower themselves during a heat call, i.e. the thermostat simply energizes ...


1

To be honest it just depends on how many cfm of duct work u already have installed in your home your unit is designed to cary 1200 cfm of air at 3 tons so if you've already reached 1200 cfm you would not have the capacity to supply another vent unless you had one room that stays cooler than the rest that you could downsize the duct on to provide you with the ...


1

Condensate drip and accumulation are normal, especially during the summer months. It is also very normal to find the drain lines terminated close to the house as you have described. Whether it is acceptable I guess could be argued based on the volume of water in question and where it is collecting. If the accumulation of water is getting worrisome, you ...


1

I'd say maybe you don't, if it doesn't have any exterior walls, which it does, so that's a yes. Drywall is the enemy. This is also a good time to upgrade any of the electrical on the interior walls as well. You're two steps from a gut job; go for it. As to whether you need more registers elsewhere, I don't know; I'm not a math wiz: calculate the heat load ...


1

iLikeDirt is wrong. If your air conditioner cannot cool your house to 74 when the outside temperature is 90, then something is wrong. Either the air conditioner is undersized or it not working properly. You should check the air filters and air vents but you may need to call in a specialist to check the unit itself. My units have kept my house at 74 with ...


1

Could be as simple as not moving air effectively when spinning the wrong way, so no load (or small load) on motor. Spin the right way, air is moved, motor slows down, work is done. Try blocking off the intake or output and see if the lack of air movement causes the fan (& motor) to speed up again.


1

Outside A/C compressors are typically supported on a concrete pad, concrete blocks, or a vinyl pad such as the one shown in the photo at page top. The air conditioner compressor support pad should be level and secure against movement. Compressors which are badly out of level may fail to function properly and need adjustment. Tipping and moving ...


1

Refrigerant needs to flow through the coils evenly without too much interference from the slope of the unit. A level concrete slab with rubber pads between the unit and the concrete is what the manufacturers recommend. "Mostly level" is probably okay for a residential unit. Get a half-inch thick outdoor rubber mat and cut it into 6"x6" squares. Put single ...


1

Too small a temperature swing on the thermostat can cause this issue as well. Many electronic thermostats have an adjustable temperature swing of 0.5, 1, 2 degrees. If this value is set too low and the compressor is restarted too soon (less than 10-15 minutes) after a cycle, it can trip a breaker as the compressor struggles to start against a pressurized ...


1

Your capacitor is too small. The new motor you list requires a 10 MFD capacitor to run at 240 VAC. Since the OEM capacitor in the unit is only 5 MFD, the new motor will randomly run backward and it will run with far less than its rated HP. Also, you should connect the new motor to run on LOW (red wire). These universal replacement condenser fan motors ...


1

Before you call a repair person, check the following: Look at the UL label of the outdoor unit. Find the item marked "Minimum Circuit Ampacity." This is the minimum size of circuit breaker required for your unit. Verify that your tripping breaker is at least this big. If it is too small, then you may need to upgrade the electric service to the unit. It ...


1

In order of questions asked: It is best to install the indoor unit near the area of maximum heat loss and gain. Above a window is a fine place, provided you have space to run the refrigerant piping and condensate line. Near a corner is okay, but a less central location means there will be a longer time required to circulate air around the room. As a ...



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