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3

The term you're looking for is "whole-house fan". It's a big fan that can blow outside air, inside. I have one in my house and they work very well for your use case. Be warned that whole-house fans are notoriously difficult to insulate and air-seal. When winter rolls around, the last thing you want is a huge hole in the side of your house through which ...


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A few theories as to what might be going on: You have bad ductwork with few returns. If that's the case, you're just not moving enough air to dehumidify every room. Your AC unit is oversized. And oversized AC unit will cool the air very fast and then shut off. The problem with that is if the AC unit is only running for short periods, it's not given enough ...


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The only technical reason that this isn't possible is that the coil needs a specific amount of air to flow through it when it's cooling. So to select the correct coil, you need to know the CFM of the air moving through the air handler. Not impossible to figure out or measure, but might not be easy for an air handler as old as yours. However, if I was a ...


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OK. These have nothing to do with and no connection to the AC compressor, which makes a lot more sense than the original question with no outside picture. Flex pipe is probably not an option - if it IS an option it needs to be a type specifically approved by the furnace manufacturer. While direct vent exhaust is relatively cool, so it can be run in ...


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Adding a return and/or additional supplies may help. Adding a supply and a return would almost certainly help -- it might be overkill, but you could always close them off if needed. The important point, however, is that this is a question of balance relative to other rooms. Knowing the best solution requires understanding the layout of your home and the ...


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Yes, that's all any thermostat does. It connects the red wire to one or more of the others to turn on fan, heat, cooling. The old mechanical thermostats did this with a simple glass bulb full of mercury fastened to a coiled spring. The temperature would make the spring length change slightly which would change the angle of the bulb, which would make the ...


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It is service call experiences like these that give HVAC guys a bad reputation. Many residential systems take between 8-13 pounds of refrigerant total. It is extremely doubtful that you lost 3 lbs of charge in 3 days, so either the first technician charged the system incorrectly (left it undercharged), or the second technicians charged it incorrectly (left ...


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There is an optional add-on part for HVAC systems called an economizer. An HVAC economizer is a dampered vent designed to save energy and give the cooling system a break. Sensors within the economizer compare the outdoor temperature and humidity with that inside the building. –Google When you call for cooling, the unit decides if it needs to run the AC ...


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For a hermetic compressor (what you most likely have in a unit of that size and vintage) -- the answer you seek is right on the compressor's nameplate, marked as "LRA", "Locked-Rotor Amps", under a "Locked Rotor" field, or in a similar fashion, as per NEC 440.4(A): The locked-rotor current of each single-phase motor-compressor having a rated-load ...


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You're looking for the V in HVAC (Ventilation). There are indeed systems that will pull in outdoor air, filter it, and supply it through the home. These systems would likely be in addition to any heating or cooling equipment, not as a part of them. To be specific, you're looking for a balanced ventilation system. Talk to your local HVAC company, they ...


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First off, if you're using a cheap flexible vinyl tube like this. You're probably losing most of your cool air, before it even reaches your house. Instead, you'll want to use an insulated duct. I'd recommend a rigid duct, but flexible duct is probably acceptable for this application. Something like this flexible insulated duct is probably acceptable. ...


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While this is rigid, it is better for connecting flex pipe.


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Without more specific information the best I can do is play the odds. Assuming this is a new problem on a system that otherwise worked reliably in the past, the most likely issues are: Dirty condenser coil (Wash the dirt out with a hose spray attachment). Weak condenser fan capacitor. (Verify that the condenser fan spins the correct direction, not ...


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IMO the most likely culprit for an A/C tripping a properly sized breaker is a poor connection/corrosion at the breaker. The breaker gets hot and tricks the thermal trip mechanism into opening the breaker.


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The red wire that is currently on the C terminal, runs out to the coil on the contactor in your condensing unit (A/C). You'll notice the white wire from the same cable is on the Y terminal, which connects to the other coil terminal on the contactor. Technically you shouldn't put two wires under a single screw terminal, but it's done quite a bit with HVAC ...


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Although I commented above that it would be good to hire a qualified person, there are a few things a skilled DIY'er could do in this case. Make sure the main disconnect is off before doing anything. The most common causes for high head pressure are (a) dirty evaporator coils and (b) a poorly functioning condenser fan. From the photo it looks like that ...


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I am not a HVAC tech but I do believe that is a high pressure switch that is tripping and there could be a couple of things going on with your unit. It is tripping to protect the compressor and fan from faulting. I would suggest calling a HVAC company to come take a look.


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There are two main contributing factors at play here. First and most importantly, the evaporator is getting too cold. The other problem is only a problem, because the first problem is a problem. And that is, that the humidity in the basement may be too high. What's happening, is that the box that contains the evaporator is getting too cold. Once it cools ...


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Warm air rises, not vise-versa. If you are running the A/C on the first floor and leave the upstairs A/C off, then the downstairs unit should not be working all that much harder than it would if the upstairs unit was cooling the upstairs. So no, cold air is not drawn upstairs by thermal convection. That does not really happen. Upstairs unit off and ...


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It sounds like the water is running along the underside of the pipe back to the house, instead of free-falling off the end. If that's the case, you could just slip an elbow on to the end and point it down. The water won't be able to travel up the elbow to the wall.


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There should be a schematic printed on a sticker on the motor. Without knowing the make and model, or looking at the diagram. I'm guessing based on other motors. One common "standard" is as follows: White = grounded (neutral) (clockwise). Black = High speed. Blue = Medium speed (medium low). Red = Low speed. Brown = Run capacitor. Brown w/ white = Run ...


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I know its a little late but I had a similar problem and my coils were stopped up with dirt. I cleaned my coils with coil cleaner and a tooth brush and rinsed with water. Make sure you brush with the grain on the coil so it doesn't get damaged. Then rinse with water. I repeated this process 3 times because it was so dirty. I used a pump up sprayer to rinse. ...


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Based on the International Residential code (which may or may not apply where you live), this installation is not compliant. Things that I see that need to be corrected include (but may not be limited to): The vent must be held at least one inch away from wood and other combustibles. The total rise of the vent must be at least five feet, to insure proper ...


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I will give you an off-label hypothetical answer for your hypothetical question TPE. Do with it what you will. Many medium efficiency systems have the evaporator coil placed downstream in the airflow after the gas furnace heat exchanger to insure that condensation from the AC does not form on the furnace heat exchanger, rusting it out. If you have a ...


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It fires up fine and then cycles through the fan working and not working [while the compressor is still on]. If it's NOT the capacitor, then the fan motor is kicking out on over heat via its integral thermal overload. You need a new fan motor (save the blades from the old one). I don't bother with testing capacitors. Both fan and cap get swapped out ...



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