Hot answers tagged

3

I think you'd end up running into a whole boat load of issues before you could even begin talking about efficiency. The first and most pressing being the rapid condensation that would occur within seconds of circulating the cold liquid (leaving you with a whole host of other DIY problems you'd need to work out). Which, I imagine would need to be somewhere ...


3

Before you begin, make sure to pull out/turn off the serviceman switch, and/or turn off the breaker, to remove power to the unit. Once you open the unit, you'll want to discharge the capacitor(s). A charged capacitor can store enough energy to kill you, so you want to make sure you discharge them. Test the motor To check the motor, you're going to want to ...


3

A cheap option, is hanger strap. It's available in both metal and plastic, and in various sizes.


2

As it sounds like it's an electronically commutated motor (ECM). My advice is to grab the control board, blower, and transformer out of the furnace. Then connect everything up as it was in the furnace. You should then be able to use the R and G thermostat terminals, to turn the fan on and off. You will have to bypass any limit circuits on the board, but ...


2

Do you maybe have a steam humidifier on the furnace? If it was wired incorrectly or was damaged it could be trying to heat water when the furnace is not running, or when no water was present in the boiler. How confident are you on the diagnosis of the electrical issues? I've heard of underground feeders upstream of the breaker panel becoming damaged and ...


2

As written this question is pretty hard to answer. It sounds like you're having AC problems tho and need a test method. Find or purchase 2 probe type thermometers like thermometers. Analog or digital doesn't matter, the only things that are important are that they have a probe and that they give the same reading laying next to each other on a table (you ...


2

The voltage needs to be the same, and the VA needs to be greater or equal to what you have now. If your transformer is 40VA and you replace with 60VA, that is fine. I would stay within parts intended for use in HVAC units. Electronics supply houses will happily sell you 24VAC transformers, but they may not be listed (certified) for HVAC use. Anyway, ...


2

You may want to make a trip to the big box store and purchase a piece of high density foam insulation board. You should be able to find materials that are colored pink or blue that comes in 1" or 2" thicknesses. Carefully cut pieces that will fit between the window bottom, side wall and the inward protruding part of the AC unit. If cut correctly you should ...


1

Dew point below coil temperature. Plugged condensate drain. Coil temperature below freezing (0°C/32°F).


1

Condensate is a byproduct of air conditioning, which is created when moisture in the air condenses on the cold evaporator coils. There are two situations where an air conditioner would not generate condensate. If there's no moisture in the air, then there's nothing to condense out of the air. If the coils are not cold enough (below the dew point), the ...


1

You'd need a closed system with a serious dose of antifreeze to get cold enough for significant cooling. Radiators usually run at least 40C above the desired room temperature to provide heat. To get the same amount of heat transfer into the radiators for cooling, the circulating water would have to be as cold as a freezer (-20C). Possibly by running 24 ...


1

It's an intriguing question. On one hand, trapped air is heated through radiation. On the other, it acts as an insulator. Keep in mind that we aren't talking about airflow, but heat flow (by conduction, convection, and radiation). The answer probably depends on how many of your windows are exposed to the sun, where extreme temperatures are generated ...


1

All things being equal, a shorter vent won't increase the risk of backdrafting unless your vent is designed to rely on the stack effect (e.g., those big black pipes that come out of pit toilets). Ed Beal is right to point out that being below the roof line is relevant but laypeople and contractors often overstate concerns about backdrafting. They do this for ...


1

This is the most common problem with the Nest. You need to hook up a "C" wire. Here's the thing. Originally, thermostats were passive devices - nothing more than switches. And so, controls were wired in a "switch loop" similar to how switches in houses were wired before current electrical code. Power went in a functional loop: from the 24V ...


1

I like PVC strap tape. You can hang it about anywhere with about anything. It doesn't kink up like metal, and it isn't sharp.


1

If you don't care how it looks, just put some screw eyes in the wall above where you want the duct work to be, and loop some wire around the duct work and attach both ends to the screw eye. Quick and easy. As an aside comment, if there is a significant difference in temperatures between the air going through the duct work and the air outside, you may ...


1

There should already be a transformer on the unit. I believe it's on the back of the unit, mounted to a junction box. There should be two exposed terminals on the transformer. One is R, and the other is C. To determine which is which, use a volt/multimeter to measure AC volts between the R wire going to the thermostat and the transformer terminals. One ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible