Hot answers tagged

5

Dehumidifiers work a bit different than A/C units. While A/C units do remove moisture, as a side effect. They also cool the air moving through them, by moving heat away. Dehumidifiers remove the moisture and cool the air, but then they heat the air back up. If you wanted your A/C system to function as a dehumidifier, you'd have to bring back the heat that ...


5

It is generally not worth the time and money to try to capture the lost heat through the exhaust system of the vast majority of tankless/on-demand water heaters. The heaters are now so efficient that they can vent the exhaust through plastic (PVC) pipe. Since these heaters also only operate when there is a call for hot water, they do not run very often. ...


4

Sounds like a string of bad luck. While an electrical spike/surge will cause problems and failures in the controllers and motors, the freon exists in an enclosed system and therefore this will not cause a leak. The compressor is a hermetically sealed unit, so there are no shaft seals that will cause freon loss. The refrigerator is the most likely to have ...


4

According to Trane installation instructions, the technician is correct. They do require 3' of clear space in front of the control box. As for why the technician chose this orientation, I can only speculate. It looks to me like the access panel is on the corner of the unit, which would mean there has to be 3' clear space at the corner. Obviously the ...


3

Wire colors with HVAC wiring are non-standardized, so the colors themselves don't help much. Your furance/air handler should have a control board with terminals labelled R, W, Y, G and C. There should be an existing wire that connects to all of these (though maybe not C) that goes to your thermostat. If anything is different in your setup, please update ...


3

Pa (Pascal) is a unit of pressure (air or hydraulic pressure). It's a very tiny unit, usually used in the thousands or millions. "inch" in this context is "inches of water", another unit of pressure. This one's easy. Get a glass of water and a clear straw. Suck on the straw just enough that the water comes up 3". Or blow hard enough it goes down 3". ...


3

The answer will depend on how much temperature drop/rise there is inside the ducts. A two stage cooling system means that the heatpump will either drop the air return temp a little bit (stage 1 is running, half cooling) or it will drop the air temp a lot (stage two is running, full cooling). Either way the fan moves the same amount of air. In stage 1 mode ...


2

Shutting some internal doors might help. Especially the door to the room upstairs with the return vent, to avoid pulling hot air upstairs. Anywhere air can get out upstairs (e.g. bathroom extractors, trickle vents) can encourage convection too. If there's heat in the downstairs hallway you might want to restrict it. I have had to do this with our (wet) ...


2

It's not necessary if you are dealing with the common 24v thermostats. Those run on low voltage AC which does not present the same hazard (and thus reason for grounding) as line voltage. Generally when there's an air handler, you're dealing with 24v controls.


2

The first thing to do is check the two wires on the outside unit when the thermostat is calling for cooling. In your picture it looks like the Blue and Yellow thermostat wires are being used. You should have 24v AC across those two wires, which would normally close the 240v relay and start up the compressor and cooling fan. If you're not getting 24v on ...


2

There is no doubt that a 2-stage unit will more evenly condition your space, for heating or cooling, that is what they are designed for. The full/partial compressor load capability, combined with variable fan speed commonly offered on 2-stage units, allows the unit to run for longer periods. That reduces temperature swings and would provide more even cooling ...


2

It depends (but likely no). IMO, duct cleaning does have it's place in today's world (pet hair/allergen reduction for example). However, it likely only needs done once every 10-15 years in most cases. Duct sealer is basically like the sealant you can put in a bicycle tube to fix a leak except that since ducts aren't a completely closed system like a tube, ...


2

I did this, almost exactly as you have drawn (in my mothers home when I was a teenager). You will need to support the back end if you cannot support the bottom "lip" of the AC from sliding forward. In other words, the AC will have torquing-force. The reason I used a shelf for my AC was because I couldn't support the top. But since you are putting the AC ...


2

no - you are being offered a great big glass of snake oil duct cleaning is already a huge scam. EPA and health canada have already for years been warning people about the risks. this is just a new twist on an already deceptive industry


2

I'll use this gif from my other answer, to try and describe how the system works. I'll focus only on the heating side, just to keep things simple. When the thermostat is not calling for heat, the circuit is open and electricity cannot flow. Once the temperature in the room drops below the set point, the switch in the thermostat closes. When the switch is ...


1

You probably can't do it yourself, but an HVAC technician likely could. Moving the unit likely requires: Evacuating the refrigerant Reconfigure (and potentially rerun) the line sets. Reconfigure (and potentially rerun) electrical. Physically moving the unit. Charging the system back up with refrigerant. You could probably do number 4, and maybe number 2 ...


1

These units are designed to be outside, so there's no reason to cover it. If you're really concerned about it, go ahead and cover it. Just make sure you don't restrict the airflow, as that can impact how well the unit works. The manufacture likely recommends annual cleaning, and maintenance. Which will probably do more good for the unit than the cover.


1

I agree with everything noted by Jeff. Further to this, you should consider cutting in dampers to aid in your airflow distribution - this should be a relatively easy task. Start with the rooms where you are overcooling the most and work back from there. I would note that dampers may not help with everything -you will struggle to balance the system if your ...


1

I believe @Fiasco Labs is correct. In addition to his answer I will add that if your AC repair man says your system is low on refrigerant, but can't find any leaks, it's time for a new repair man. Refrigerant doesn't magically disappear. It's an 18 year old system so it's almost garunteed the leak is in your evaporator coil.


1

If the upstairs is truly another zone there should be a separate damper to close it off or reduce the flow. Zoned means you have separate control over different areas. Sounds like you either need to adjust the existing damper or install one. Good luck!



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible