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I wanted to comment but I don't have the rep so: I live in Germany where it rains a lot. Our house is built on clay. The basement used to be really damp - it would run down the walls. So here is what I did: Dry it from the outside - dig down the outside of the wall, a trench about 60 cm wide, let it dry, paint with bitumen and fill the gap with pebbles so ...


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If your house is too humid, it's because too much moisture is entering it. To fix that, you need to find the source of the moisture and reduce or eliminate it. There are lots of places the moisture could be coming from. Humid air might entering your house from your crawlspace or basement (especially if you get water pooling after heavy rains), leaks in ...


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Jesus, don't breath too deep, LOL. The problem is your house is too cold, so it is causing excessive condensation. So, your choices are either to turn the heat up and make the house a lot warmer, like 80-degrees +... Or you can get an industrial strength, whole-house dehumidifier, and I can tell you that thing will suck down electricity like nobody's ...


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What kinf of storage area is this? If there's such a big fluctuation in temperatures and humidity levels, you may want to consider some self storage options which are a little more regulated. Especially if you intend to preserve these items and use them again at a later date! It'll be a big waste if the items put in storage are ruined after a little while in ...


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I use a standalone humidity reducer in the wettest room of my house. I've used one in a finished basement too, when it got too damp down there we ran it. For about $100 USD you can get a decent dehumidifier that plugs into a regular wall socket. It works by pulling water from the air. They also produce heat, which will raise the room temperature a little ...



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