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The problem with adding humidity to a leaky home is amount of water vapor air can hold varies significantly with temperature. While 30% relative humidity at 72°F seems dry and harmless in and of itself if you cool this same air to 38°F (let alone -10°F it sometimes get) all of the sudden you have reached 100% RH. The difficulty is making sure ...


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While not as effective as hot air if using hot rather than cold water tap with an evaporative style humidifier it does still provide humidity. My system is configured to allow humidifier to turn on blower fan separate from heat if needed when humidity is low with good results.


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Yes, the tile joints do let water pass. The grout is porous, and additionally does not seal tight with the tiles as it ages (causing it to actually pull some water in via capillary action). Many tile materials are not waterproof either. Bathroom tiling is only "waterproof" in the sense that it is a finish material that will not be damaged by water. It does ...


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Your problem is probably caused by the steam from showering condensing on and around your windows. I would recommend keeping the bathroom door closed while you shower and turning the exhaust fan on while you shower and for at least a half hour after. This will greatly reduce the moisture in your apartment. On warmer days it would also help to crack your ...


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You can purhcase products such as DampRid. It is availabe in various size packages and will work to passively dehumidify a space. You do not want to use a fan or any active air mover to attempt to dry the window space. This can enable the mold to spread to other areas. Mold is dangerous to your health and this issue should be handled soon. One point of ...


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UPDATED (not enough reputation to comment, so editing this answer): Another interesting thread here: http://www.greenbuildingtalk.com/Forums/tabid/53/aff/13/aft/77152/afv/topic/Default.aspx Synopsis: if the chilled water is not cold enough, the fan coil unit will not remove enough moisture from the incoming air and RH could rise to mold inducing levels. ...


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I can offer my suggestion for storing clothes and fabrics, but not books. When my wife and I had to store a TON of clothes, towels, sheets, jackets, sleeping bags, pillows...you get the idea....we used vacuum storage bags. Everything sat in a storage facility for over 2 years, the facility was unheated in the winter and zero air con in the summer. Being ...


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I'd start by adjusting the humidifier on the furnace. It sounds like you don't have to add any additional humidity to the air, so you could probably turn it down (or possibly off). If you have a gas fired furnace, turning the heat up a bit could help. If the furnace does not have an air intake connected to the outside, the air used for combustion will be ...


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Depending on where you live and the rights as a renter, this seems like something that should be taken up with the building owner. You can certainly attempt mitigation, but from personal and anecdotal experience, mold growth that shows up in living areas, is usually a sign of much worse mold behind those visible surfaces. Often times this would require mold ...


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For an off-grid dehumidification system, you have two or three choices that I can think of. One is to install additional power panels to support the additional load of a "standard-type" electric refrigeration-based dehumidifier, and purchase the most efficient version of that type that you can. The most likely alternative, which I'm not aware of being ...


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Another issue may be that my bathroom doesn't have an exhaust fan That's likely the primary issue. Excessive moisture in a short period of time finding it's way to the coldest surfaces. A dehumidifier won't help with that type of moisture issue. Short of a proper exhaust (or just a window) in the bath you are probably better off fixing the issue on the ...


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If your house is too humid, it's because too much moisture is entering it. To fix that, you need to find the source of the moisture and reduce or eliminate it. There are lots of places the moisture could be coming from. Humid air might entering your house from your crawlspace or basement (especially if you get water pooling after heavy rains), leaks in ...


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No you don't need to do anything special. People have freezers in houses that are not air conditioned after all. Obviously keeping it powered and the door closed as much as possible will help keep a stable temperature.


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You should be just fine storing these in airtight containers, but ONLY if you are absolutely sure they're airtight. Airtight ideally means that there's no transfer of air between contents and the outside. If your plastic boxes are truly airtight, there's no air transfer happening, in either direction. Inside humidity at the point in time that you sealed a ...


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Welcome to the wonderful world (or mold) of wet basements. Assuming you've stopped it for 3 hours after running 30 minutes: So long as water is coming in, the dehumidifier needs to keep running on the humidistat. In half an hour you're pulling the easily available water in the air down to 50% - but there's an entire earth of more water wanting to replace ...


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As a tenant I believe you've already done too much as this should be the land lords problem to rectify and not yours. Notify the landlord verbally and in writing about the on going issue of the infestation in your apartment. Contact your local city / town / government about your landlords responsibilities and your rights as a tenant in this type of a ...


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Chest freezers are fairly resistant frosting, because the cold air stays settled inside the freezer when the door is opened. I live in an area with high humidity for 2-3 months a year (not quite as high as yours, but close), and went 5 years without needing to defrost my chest freezer. But that was with relatively light usage (probably around 3-5 ...


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I am a licensed contractor, home inspector and certified energy auditor. Energy audits using blower doors in conjunction with infrared is ideal for air leakage that leads to heat and humidity loss and increased energy costs. The whole house humidifiers can be very problematic and can shorten the usable life of your furnace. I have been on countless home ...



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