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Dehumidifiers work a bit different than A/C units. While A/C units do remove moisture, as a side effect. They also cool the air moving through them, by moving heat away. Dehumidifiers remove the moisture and cool the air, but then they heat the air back up. If you wanted your A/C system to function as a dehumidifier, you'd have to bring back the heat that ...


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No, a separate dehumidifier is not better. It simply does not have the airflow of the AC. Running the central AC at 72 for an hour or two in the morning is a good idea to remove the moisture from the air.


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Humidity is variable everywhere. I live in the desert where the indoor humidity varies from 10% to 60% depending on the time of year. I've installed engineered hardwood and it's totally fine. Don't most houses in the northeast have hardwood flooring? I think you'll be totally fine too. Just keep in mind seasonal cycles; if you install during a high-humidity ...


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Given all the experts that have looked at this first hand, I am hesitant to suggest a hypothesis based on other situations I have seen. Also I live in a dry climate, so forgive me if I miss something obvious to everyone who is actually there in New Orleans. As you know, condensation is the result of warm humid air contacting a cooler surface which is below ...


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You get condensation because the windows (and evidently part of the ceiling, unless that's just a roof leak) are the most poorly insulated part of the building, so they cool below the dewpoint of the interior air. Bay windows are particularly bad as they are a fairly large expanse of window stuck out into the cold, and not infrequently the non-window parts ...


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Humid air rises and warm air that can carry more moisture rises. Cooking adds moisture to the air. All else being equal, the dehumidifier has a easier job removing moisture from cooler air with a higher relative humidity. I would place the unit upstairs in the central location with good air circulation, nearer to the kitchen and away from any heat ...


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Take my advice with a grain of salt – I live on an extremely humid island – but my dehumidifier can be set not to work below certain relative humidities, and those are 40%, 60%, and 80%. A quick googling turns up a number of sites that suggest 40%-50% as the ideal range for health and comfort. It may depend on where you live (Arizona?), but the 16%-22% ...


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Normal humidity should do no harm to anything that's been properly made. Remember, humanity has lived with poorly sealed houses in humid climates for centuries, and our belongings have adapted to deal with that. Woodworkers, for example, are very aware that wood expands and contracts as it gains and losses moisture, at different rates along and across the ...


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Please first check your measuring tool by putting it to your refrigerator.it will be around 8C. Can you measure the outside temperature and humidity too if your measuring tool is working? It seems there is a problem in your fan coil supply air temperature because of it high degree;21C. It's normal temperature is 15C in hot summer day. The 21C may lower ...


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I had a similar problem in my house, and after considerable whining from my SO, I started digging out and replacing the cracked tiles. That turned out to be rather tedious, as the tiles were well attached to the wall and there was much collateral damage. Ultimately my diagnosis was as Aloysius Defenestrate hints at in the comments. The cracks were along a ...


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While this would just be short term use. If you have natural gas, propane or oil appliances, this could & even would suck noxious fumes into the house which could eventually or quickly kill you. That's the bad news. Other than that, an exhaust fan does, of course, remove heated & cooled air. If you're single I don't see this being a big deal. But, ...


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I've seen a few amazing scenarios where the people turned it into a real plus: Garage - They were 3' above flood level. Back basement wall restructured for 2-car garage door (for winter only), yard was graded down & toward the river, driveway & boat launch were installed, all windows were left open until winter, ceiling super insulated, vapor ...


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Dry air is more dense than humid air, so your thinking about humid air accumulating near the ceiling makes sense. Because it's a basement, however, I'm going to assume humidity is coming through the floor or walls. Tackling the source of the humidity by letting drier air circulate along the floor and walls will probably be most effective at drying the space. ...


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Firstly, when your fan is running DO NOT open your bathroom window. Open one elsewhere and have your door ajar of if there is a good gap at the botton close it. Why? What you are looking to do is draw air ACROSS the bathroom space so the warm moist air is picked up and drawn out. By having the window open you have what's effectively a short circuit so air ...


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Definitely get the Landlord involved. Unless there's a standing pool of water, much bigger than the toilet, there's no apparent nor logical reason for any room to stay so noticeably different. I'd say maybe a backdraft through the exhaust fan from a faulty damper, but you've disproven that. In the meantime, check with the neighbors & see if either are ...


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I ran the following tests with an ambient temperature of approximately 70 degrees F. I measured the (hot) water flowing into the humidifier and the water flowing out of the drain to calculate the % evaporation in each case (there is a reasonable margin of error). Furnace running in low stage. Approximate air temperature coming from register is 120 ...


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How much moisture is ok depends on the window frame material and the material that condensation may drip or seep onto. The primary issue is rot. If your storm windows are aluminum or vinyl, some condensation will not likely cause damage. Wood windows will see degradation of their finish and ultimately wood decay. The only way to completely prevent ...


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In Washington, DC you want to remove as much water as possible from the dank soup that passes for summer air. Your AC does that. You definitely do NOT want to add any more humidity in the summer, there. In a desert climate you might, but then you'd probably also be looking at a swamp cooler, which does both cooling and humidifying - in a DRY climate.


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The humidity swing you mention is accurate for the air, not so for the wood. It does not change that fast. It's all about the MC (moisture content) of the wood when it comes to acclimation. The humidity does affect it but over a period of time. The main thing about acclimating, is getting the new flooring close enough to the humidity of the location it is ...


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There is no one appropriate humidity level. In the dry, cold north household humidity must be below 20% during certain weather to prevent massive condensation on windows, which can result in damage. Here's a chart showing approximate levels for different outside temperatures: Read more I agree with the comments above indicating that you likely have an ...


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Most residential AC system thermostats only turn on based on temperature. And most residential AC systems only dehumidify when then AC is cooling. Therefore, it's very possible that the AC is cooling the house faster than it can dehumidify. Try turning the thermostat down a couple of degrees.


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This is going to be sort of a comment, or at least not a complete answer. When designing the system, the goal is not to create a breeze through the space. The goal is to control pressure equalization in such a way that the air is mixed and dehumidified (conditioned). Having one large return at one end of the space, and a large return at the other may work. ...



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