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19

I went though a similar debate last year and ended up getting a whole house humidifier. I never remember reading that you should be able to get the humidity level to normal levels though normal means (shower, cooking, etc). In a big house, that is most likely not possible. Do you have a humidistat now, or does your stand alone unit give you a reading? I ...


15

In the winter it is 30 to 40 percent in cold climates. During the summer, indoor humidity levels should be kept below about 65 percent to minimize the potential for mold growth and below about 50 percent to minimize dust mites. See this article for some more great information on humidity levels: Keep Your Home Healthy


14

I assume you are in a cold climate, like Minnesota (where I am). I will address your question in three parts; the first two have to do with the humidifier. The "winter" setting on the duct in your photo: It appears from the photo that the duct in question goes from your humidifier around to the return (intake) side of your furnace's ducting. This needs ...


13

30-40% in winter. Otherwise below 60% to keep mold away. Or even below 50% to avoid dust mites. You can also see this question: Humidity Levels.


10

1) The issues around curing concrete too quickly are where the concrete is thin and in direct sunlight (i.e. a sidewalk in the sun). The concrete in your basement has cured enough to be structurally sound. The rule of thumb I have heard is that concrete cures 85% in the first 7 days. 10% over the next 3 weeks and the remaining 5% over the next 20 years. 2) ...


9

I'd be surprised that you'd have this much moisture from condensation, especially since condensation doesn't change the net moisture level, it's actually removing moisture from the air. Double check for leaks, signs of corrosion on pipes, particularly at the joints, for caulk that is cracking in the showers, and the drain pipes. Edit: One more thought, ...


9

What you need to do is to keep the surfaces that moist air will touch warm so the condensation won't form in the first place. So, for windows that means installing double glazing so that the interior pane is the same temperature as the room and the outside pane can be a lot colder. For walls it's harder - but installing cavity wall insulation (assuming you ...


8

For the ducts, the setting indicates where you should set the switch based on the season. If your house has separate air return ducts on different floors or even multiple ducts on the same floor, changing the setting changes which ducts pull air from the house, allowing lower ducts to suck cold air out in the winter and higher ducts to suck hot air out in ...


8

The simplist solution to dehumidifying in an area with no drain is to use a dehimidifier with a built in pump such as this one: It has a long thin tube that can be routed to an area with a drain (such as a washing machine drainpipe) or to the outside (through a window frame or a very small hole drilled through the wall). If to the outside, you need to ...


7

I had a self piercing saddle valve on my whole house humidifier when I bought the house. It had developed mineral deposits in the piercing hole and no longer worked. I ended up taking it off, cutting the pipe and sweating in a regular valve. Self-piercing valves are notorious for clogging up and also for eventually leaking. Since it is in you attic, any ...


6

By the sound of things you must be using the older ballasts with a starter plug. These ballasts cause flickering of the bulb and this constant flickering causes damage to the ballast itself. The ballast has to generate a very high voltage to "spark" the tube. Once the tube is glowing the ballast can relax and give a constant power output. The state ...


5

Latex paint takes about 24-36 hours to cure in normal/optimal (50%) humidity environments, and longer to dry if your humidity is higher. The easiest way to bring down household humidity in the summer is to leave your A/C cranked down. Your air conditioner will remove humidity from the air. First, ensure that any patching you do has dried thoroughly. Prime ...


5

I believe the answers above are a bit more realistic than others I've seen. Remember if air outside is 60% RH and the temp is 80°F that would be equal to about 75% RH with with a basement temp of 60°F. Keeping it around 55%-60% will be comfortable and obtainable with a decent dehumidifier.


5

Yes, there should be no problem with doing that, provided you're within distance constraints of the pump. The washer stand pipe should just be a vertical pipe, with your washer drain going inside it, and not actually connected/sealed. This is done so that there is a vacuum break. You should simply put the pipe from this pump along side the washer pipe in the ...


5

I think the comment about finding the source is very important - there is a reason it is humid, and unless this is solved, you will never solve the problem only band-aid it, which will cost more in the long run going against the "low-cost" part of this question. The definition of low cost varies person-to-person. Under $100 is low cost to me, but maybe not ...


4

If you have a crawlspace with an earth bottom, it's possible the humidity is coming up through that--check whether you have a vapor barrier below your house. You probably don't, given the age of the house. Getting a dehumidifier is definitely a possibility. Or a 'swamp cooler' arrangement, where cold water is used to make condensate that you then pipe out ...


4

The blower door test is not too bad. I had an eco energy audit done, which includes a blower door test among some other visual inspections, and that was $150. Fixing any leaks will help with your humidity, as well as help with your heating and overall make your house more comfortable. I'm not sure if it will totally replace the need for a whole-house ...


4

You could try lagging the pipes - both hot and cold. This should keep the temperature in the space more constant and therefore reduce the build up of condensation. Another thing to try is to put a second wall between your bedroom wall and the shower pipes. Again the goal here is to keep the temperature behind your bedroom wall more constant and less humid. ...


4

Carpet will be cheaper to have installed, but the life time is much shorter than hardwood. Look into strand bamboo. I believe it is much harder than any other hardwood and not as susceptible to humidity. I used it in my house on the most of the main level (about 1,500 square feet) and have been very happy with it. Because it so hard, it is more difficult ...


4

The most likley cause of the moisture is too much humidity. Some solutions: A dehumidifier Fans to vent/move air around (to outside) Increased Insulation in the attic (to avoid a large temperature difference between the ceiling and the attic) Basically the humidity needs to be lowered inside the house. You can get a Hygrometer to measure the humidity ...


4

A Hygrometer is used to test the level of Humidity. I'll bet that your levels are very high. High humidity can lead to health issues with mold groth, not to mention it can destroy your home. Things you can do: Vent the dryer to outdoors, a big source of the problem! Add a bathroom vent to the outdoors, not in an attic or other room! Run the fan for 30 ...


4

I'd go with either a layer of cork or polyiso rigid foam. Then a floating floor on top. A nearby residential tower actually requires the cork underlay. The rigid foam will work just as well at lower cost. The float floor can be two layers of ply staggered and screwed to each other, or a engineered hardwood product. See also the "Sound Isolation Store" ...


4

You are quite correct about the thermodynamics. The heat involved in a phase change of water is so significant that professional HVAC guys specify the performance requirements for cooling as two different parameters: sensible and latent heat to be removed. The latter is the heat involved in phase change of water and is often more demanding than removing ...


4

Don't forget that the percentage humidity is RELATIVE. Cold air cannot contain as much moisture as warm air. For the same amount of water in the air, the relative humidity will increase as the temperature drops. By consulting a psychometric chart, I see your overnight run removed 19 grains of water per pound of dry air. If you rewarmed the morning air back ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


3

Sealing up the crawlspace vents are the last thing you want to do (IMHO). If anything you want to improve the "natural" ventilation to the crawl space, doing so will (greatly) aid the evaporation of moisture and prevent mold taking hold. A sealed (stagnant air), moist space, is a pretty good environment for mold to take hold and grow (spread) in. If you ...


3

Recommended humidity levels for human comfort is 30-60%[1]. Plus, in a basement, you want to keep things dry for the sake of the structure. I'd let it run as much as it needs to run. [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_comfort#Relative_humidity


3

Another suggestion, which is unfortunately not DIY is a thermal imaging scan of your house. They basically take video of your house with an infrared camera and it captures heat loss as color variations. The cost is comparable to the blower test. Here is a link to a sample thermographic inspection. This may be one of those times where DIY isn't the best ...


3

I suppose if you want to pay for the electricity to run your furnace, A/C and humidifier all summer while you are not there, that is certainly an option. But if you consider that all these parts have a service life, do you really want to spend 50% of that service life running them when you are not home? There's also the problem of if it breaks or otherwise ...


3

Humidity levels between 40-50% are what most people prefer in a house. So, I'd say that setting is fine. If you live in a humid region, you may want to keep the dehumidifier running down there all the time (and set it up to drain via a hose rather than having to constantly empty the bucket)



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