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11

I don't know of any specific schedule, but I can recommend several "best practices": Buy braided hoses. These are the metal hoses with an inner plastic tubing. They are NOT guaranteed not to fail, but their failure is much less likely. Their most vulnerable failure point would be at the connection to the coupling. Inspect the hoses annually. Do not ...


7

I would expect more water to flow unless you have extremely low water pressure. You have a 3/4" line and all the water pressure of either a municipal water system or a water pump. Splitting that into two lines will not likely double the flow rate as there is a pressure drop, but it should increase the total flow rate considerably. I would expect it to almost ...


5

Durability - I have often seen the stainless/chrome plated hose breaking up after a few years... this is where the hose splits along the seam of the hose... This will not happen with the braided hose due to the fact that you have a netted sheath. Also. the braided pattern is more flexible than its counterpart. Cost - This hose is substantially cheaper ...


5

I have had good luck getting these fittings to release with an open end wrench. Slide a wrench the same size as the outside diameter of the tubing over the tubing. Then use it to push in the release collar. It works well in tight areas or where the fittings are close together. If you have to replace any tubing a clean cut is required to get a good seal.


4

It's a quick-connect t-fitting, not a valve. You should be able to push down on the little lip at each connection and pull the hose loose. Or you can just cut each hose and replace it with a new fitting. You just push the hose in until it clicks and you're done.


4

In addition to what Greebo said, they also make hoses with the shutoff built into the hose, but the reviews on these are pretty bad and won't stop a small leak.


4

Can you turn off the water supply to the hose? Or is the tap at the "business" end of the hose? If it's the former then you can turn off the supply to the hose and leave the tap at the end of the hose open. This means that if there is any water left in the hose it will a) drain away and b) (more importantly) be able to expand safely along the length of the ...


4

Since you already have to dig it up to fix it, don't bother trying to repair the crack. Cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. Use a coupling suitable for the type of pipe you are working with and that is rated for burial.


4

It's possible to get the hose screwed on by hand tightly enough that it won't leak if your grip is strong enough; I think the strength required is within the normal range for an adult (mine is relatively strong though, so your mileage may vary). But before you get a wrench, there's a couple of things you should check: make sure the threads on the faucet ...


3

I would start by cleaning up the corrosion and debris. If possible remove the hose/boot and clean any debris from the inside sealing surface. Inspect the hose for any cracks or holes. Looking at the photo the bottom clamp appears to be installed correctly. The upper hose appears to be installed too low. The clamp is squeezing the hose but not the pipe. The ...


3

It is proper to put a hose clamp on a connection like that as often the barbs aren't sufficient especially after it's come off a few times. If you're worried about damaging the fitting from the furnace just add another fitting after it and secure it the the furnace or floor, etc. Then your standalone fitting will be the one that gets damaged if somebody ...


3

Over tightening a plumbing fixture can be just as bad as under-tightening, as it can damage the threads and prevent a proper seal. In your case, you should try to fix this first by reconnecting the pipe with a cleaned fitting: Remove the hose. Remove the existing tape completely. Clean the threads on the hose and the fitting with a wire brush. Wrap new ...


3

You are correct in the fact that water is always present in the hose. When you turn on the faucet water gets sent through a diverter valve, this valve splits the flow of water between the faucet and the hose. It detects changes in pressure and adapts the flow accordingly. If water is not flowing through your hose and it does not go back to the faucet then ...


2

In general, "cold enough to freeze water inside the hose". Eighth grade physics tells us that water expands when frozen. Consequently having standing water inside a sealed container is not going to be good for the container's health. The real problem is draining the hose rather than storing it. However, water being a fluid gets into all kinds of cracks, ...


2

If I understand your question and ascii art, what you're looking for is called a bulkhead fitting. There are a ton of different types: made from different materials, inside thread, outside thread, barbed, one-sided, two-sided, and all different sizes. I'm sure you can find one that is suitable for your application. The big box stores should at least have ...


2

You branch off from the copper tubing with a 1/4" compression tee. Cut out a small section of tubing for which the tee replaces. You must use a tubing cutter to do this, any other method will cause the tube to become oval. Install the short piece removed on the side outlet of the tee. Attach a 1/4" compression x 1/2" pipe thread adapter to the short ...


2

Caulking is designed to keep water out of cracks. It remains relatively soft and pliable even after it sets up so that vibrations do not cause it to crack. One thing it does not have is great adhesion properties. If you've ever started peeling it you will know what I mean - it pulls off relatively easily. Because of this, I doubt it will hold up to water ...


2

You would use a coupling tape and hose clamps. You use thin flex aluminum duct like shown in picture but I like to stick with the semi rigid flex duct. Zip ties can be used on thin stuff but not semi rigid.


1

A check valve will surely prevent water from flowing backwards, as that's exactly what it's designed to do. In case you're not familiar with them, the arrow points in the direction of flow. So whichever way you want the water to flow, point the arrow in that direction.


1

The first order of business is to find out where the frost line is in your area. The second is to dig a trench 6 to 12 inches deeper than the frost line from the immediate vicinity of an outdoor frostproof faucet (a frostproof hose bibb at the house sill is ideal) to the pasture. The house end of the trench should be pretty well squared off. You can get ABS ...


1

Garden hose gasket, do you have one? They like to fall out and get lost, and without one it can become nearly impossible to tighten the connection up hard enough to prevent leakage.


1

Actually, it sounds more like a siphon or vacuum breaker working fine. It's not leaking with pressure on. When you turn off the sillcock and release pressure on the hose, it moves the water in the hose away from the sillcock, creating a vacuum at the faucet, which causes the siphon breaker valve to open. Then the water rebounds a bit and some comes out. They ...


1

Best choice for a long term fix is to replace the section. If replacement is simply not an option, then consider using self-sealing silicone tape. You'll want to depressurize the line first, and make sure you have room to move the tape around while you patch it up. Most manufacturers state the tape is only for short term repair, but there is quite a bit ...


1

In this case, a gasket in the hose is likely degraded. Replace the entire hose with a new one. For this particular fitting, PTFE (plumbing) tape should not be used, and perhaps could be causing the leaking if it is preventing the hose from seating properly.


1

Does flexible = plastic or flexible = braided hose with permanent nut fittings on the ends? If this is one of those braided type hoses with permanently attached fittings on each end, then they seal with a rubber gasket permanently installed in the nut fitting. The hose itself could be cracked from age or hardened enough that it doesn't engage with the barbs ...


1

A couple of reasons that can think of is wear to the inside and edge of the spout from the steel rubbing against it. The braid might extend and retract with less noise.


1

Like everyone has said, you're making a big transition. But not one that can't be made. Personally, I'd firmly attach the timer itself to the back of your fridge, then pipe/adapter/transition your way from the timer to the aforementioned 1/4" compression tee. That way the timer always holds still and any garden hose / timer manipulation movements are not ...


1

This is a pretty dramatic transition in sizes and connections. You are going from 1/4 inch copper (compression fittings) to 1/4 inch tee to 1/4 to 1/2 adapter to 3/4 inch bibb faucet (or adapter, if you can find) to 3/4 inch hose to 3/4 inch timer to 3/4 inch hose to 3/4 to 1/2 tubing adapter to the irrigation tubing. As the comments point out, very ...


1

There's no reason you can't, you'll just need several couplers along the way, and this will likely end up a very "previous owner"-type solution if you leave it in place. The 1/4" lines do not move much water, so plan accordingly.


1

If the weatherman predicts a freeze of any kind (as in air temperature lower than 32*F or 0*C, either disconnect and drain or "drip" the hose. When water freezes, it expands. This is what causes the damage. Certain types of hose are more forgiving than others; your "garden-variety" (NPI) water hose, which is simply unreinforced vinyl, will usually stretch ...



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