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10

If you're installing in room where you can't drop above or below the room to run your cables, consider putting up crown molding -- it typically leaves a small channel behind it which is ideal for hiding speaker cables. You can then punch holes in the top of the wall where you need to run vertically, fish the wires through, staple it up into the corner, then ...


9

I'm a fan of the recessed media box that monoprice sells. I installed it pre-drywall which I'm sure is easier, but it does have the ability to be installed as a retrofit (you don't say in your question which way you're doing this). There's two major issues with having actual connectors in the wall behind the TV: you have two additional connections per ...


9

If your heart is not set on a silver screen, I had good results using blackout cloth - this is white, rubber-impregnated cloth that is used for curtains. I got a swath that was 48 inches wide - 1.21 meters, so a bit smaller than what you're looking for, but the largest they had available at the fabric shop. By using a single swath, I avoided seams in the ...


6

If your current AC is not adequate to extend to the garage area, then a ductless mini-split wall mounted AC unit is probably ideal for your situation. Once installed, you'll likely exceed the $1500 budget, but I think it's the best of the options. You wall mount half of the unit inside the home and run the cooling lines through the wall and out to an ...


6

You'll need to pick up a PowerBridge type device, they allow you to have an inlet in one location and an outlet in another. You'll connect the inlet to the outlet using cable rated for the appropriate load (14/2 Romex most likely), this insures everything is up to code (since it's not proper to run extension cords through walls). To make the outlet ...


6

In general I think the pros prefer the wall plates. It gives it a cleaner look especially when nothing is attached (no components are installed yet). I know some audio/video-phile types actually prefer "big hole" method as it cuts down on the number of connections. Imagine 1 cable (2 connections, 1 at the cable box and 1 at the TV) compared to 2 cables ...


5

Have you thought about using in-ceiling speakers? Then you could fish the wires through the ceiling (assuming the joists run the right way or you have access to the attic).


5

You're not showing all the pieces. What we see is a curtain rod and the center support. There are brackets for the end that the rod hooks over. Pictured is a dual curtain rod hanger bracket. The hole in the rod catches on the tang and it drops down onto the bracket. The answer to your problem might be shown in the picture, use a nice board that spans ...


4

Depending on the structure, the header of the door may be load bearing and you'll be met with a solid block of wood behind the drywall that shouldn't be cut. Drill a small test hole from the inside of the closet first. Otherwise, installing a return grill on each side of the wall is fairly simple. Leave at least an inch or two border to the edge of the ...


4

You really want to keep these separate in a high quality audio setup, as you will get interference...especially through a sub. I would even recommend routing the cables in entirely different directions if at all possible to minimise mains hum. Is there no other route for them? As an example, my mains wiring is in the walls, so where possible I have my audio ...


4

HDMI and speaker wire are basically signal wires, not power wires. Both the voltage and amperage is very low. Indoors it is safe to run these hidden or exposed without channel or conduit if they are properly rated. See this Q&A for a discussion of proper rating. When channel or conduit is used, it is either for convenience in handling, and to keep the ...


4

You can buy projector screen paint, and just paint your screen on the wall. I don't have personal experience with it, but here's one example -- $179 for 1 gallon which looks to be more than enough for your screen. I'd also recommend trying your projector on a white wall before doing anything -- you may find it to be acceptable without investing in any kind ...


4

One thing you could do is install a whole house surge protector in your breaker box. These typically come with a large $ warranty if something does get blown. They come in may forms, the easiest ones simply install into a single circuit slot in your breaker box. Others hard wire in and have a small box that mounts right next to your breaker box. ...


4

The number that I look for is in a surge suppressor is the energy or Joules rating, with the higher the better. This one is rated for 720 J, which is middle-of-the-road. You can find surge strips from about 200J to 4000J. The thing with any modern TV is that you're probably going to be using a co-ax input for cable TV, and potentially an ethernet input ...


4

I have the same receiver and hit this problem when initially setting it up as well. Essentially, the receiver outputs the video signal in the same format as the input, so: for HDMI inputs use the HDMI output, for component inputs use the monitor out (component) jacks, and for composite inputs use the monitor out (video) jack. For your scenario, you'll ...


3

How do you know that it's voltage fluctuations causing the problems and not RFI? Consider adding RF chokes to your setup to minimize that possiblity.


3

Get yourself some shelf brackets and attach them to your wall into studs. Work out the spacing of the brackets for your screen. The brackets look like this: Attach some 3/4" hardwood (oak, maple, etc.) planks to it to make a nice looking shelf. Attach the screen underneath the shelves which should conceal the hanging brackets and give you the clearance ...


3

It could be a grounding problem -- electronic devices are often very sensitive to the quality of the ground line. Invest in a receptacle tester and make sure that the receptacle with your home theater system is actually wired correctly. Do the same for all the other receptacles that cause the problem. If you haven't already, map out which branch circuits ...


3

I just setup a 5.1 system and obsessed a LOT about this. The room has 8 foot ceilings but has 4 foot knee walls on two sides (with a 45 degree run of sheet rock up to the ceiling). Placement in the corners was the "proper" location for speaker separation as well as aesthetics (and to keep kids from bumping into them). However, I was worried if I put the ...


3

Something is sensitive to fluctuations in voltage. My first guess would be the receiver. Instead of buying a new projector or receiver, buy a power conditioner. This will ensure that your cable box, receiver and projector all receive a constant voltage.


3

Save your money and buy the cheap cables. They're the same. The "premium cable" game is nothing more than a big scam.


2

What you are looking for is "lazy susan hardware" This will give you the spinning base you need to put your rotating shelves on. I know Ace sells it, probably HD and Lowes do too. A google search found a few examples of motorized lazy susan hardware - and some how to videos.


2

If you want to try looking for a voltage problem, you could get a simple multi-meter, stick the probes into the outlet and then watch it while someone else fiddles with other devices. You'll watch the AC voltage on the meter while someone else flips stuff on and off, and you might see a voltage drop. The only way that voltage (especially through a power ...


2

It depends on how much work you want to do. Roxul makes a product called "safe and sound" that is a sound deadener and placed in the wall cavities behind the drywall.


2

See my previous answer to a similar question. (It's kind of funny. I even mention that that same kit you found seems a bit pricey.) I used a single, recessed, dual-voltage wall plate that lets you do your media and power cables all in one plate. You just buy an "old work" electrical box, wire it up, and attach it to this plate instead of to the drywall. ...


2

According to NEC 300.3(C)(1), you can only run the speaker cable in the same enclosure as a higher-voltage circuit as the insulation of speaker cable is rated for the voltage of the higher-voltage circuit. NEC 2008 300.3(C) Conductors of Different Systems (1) 600 Volts, Nominal, or Less. Conductors of ac and dc circuits, rated 600 volts, nominal, or ...


2

I saw a relevant thing at hackaday.com You can paint a large piece of hardboard and use that to cover the wall. http://makeprojects.com/Project/Glass-Bead-Projection-Screen/685/1


2

Ceiling Ethernet drops for wireless access points (POE) RG6 Coax for CATV Wiring for alarm systems Wiring for Security cameras (sometimes coax, sometimes Ethernet, etc.) Low voltage wiring for lighting controls? Central Vac


2

Although all those things are good, and in fact I always do the first three on your list, the important thing is not actually installing them, but ensuring you run cable ducts. If you have ducting, then you future proof the apartment - need another cable? just run it through. So plan as follows: Decide where you will need Ethernet, power and audio wall ...


2

This seems to be a design and/or shopping question, that is completely dependent on personal preference. You could trim the hole out with wood, some type of metal or plastic flange, some type of port hole from a ship (if you're going for a nautical theme), etc. The options are only limited by your imagination.



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