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You can purchase and utilize a common DPDT type relay (Double Pole / Double Throw) to create a cross over switch. It is pretty easy to understand from the following relay diagram: You connect one circuit to the two NC (normally closed) terminals of the relay. The other circuit connects to the two COM (common) terminals. Then you add two additional wires ...


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Personally, I'd stick with a carrier-current or radio system -- TREMENDOUSLY easier to install, lower risk due to the inherent isolation, UL or equivalent certification so you aren't going to have home inspectors failing your place for code violations... and, frankly, if you are asking this question you shouldn't be designing this system.


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You moved the Green to C on one end but the picture with the transformer in the top left shows Green still on G there it should be on C. The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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You might want to look at OpenMotics, an open source home automation system: https://www.openmotics.com. Note: I'm one of the developers at OpenMotics.


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X-10 or similar remote AC controllers.


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There are numerous timer switches that replace a conventional switch in a wall box. For example, this is a seven day timer from Honeywell The wiring for simple timers is pretty straightforward. Usually you simply replace the existing switch and wire the new switch the same way. Often you need to add a neutral wire to the switch, and most recently wired ...


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There are numerous products that meet this need. You can start with a Google or product search, for example: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=%22Wireless+Add+On+Switches%22 There's no problem permanently leaving the existing switch left on. You can even get a small plastic clip that will prevent someone from accidentally switching the light off (tape never works ...


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There are numerous remote control systems available that use a stand alone switch and a receiver that either sits in the light fixture or in a circuit box to receive the signal and control power on the line. One example is the LevNet system form Leviton. The receiver replaces your exisiting switch and a wireless switch goes wherever you choose. A simpler ...


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You could also consider replacing the switch with a motion-controlled/manual switch combo. Walk in the room and it turns on automatically. Turn it off manually when you go to bed. Bonus lower energy bill if you are forgetful like me.


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I did exactly that some years ago, replacing the light switch with an X10 remotely controllable switch, and hang the remote on the wall at the other end of the room. However, that approach will NOT work with LED bulbs, due to the way it powers itself, and may not work safely with fluorescents. (X10 is the low-budget brand which introduced carrier-current ...



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