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I wouldn't recommend it. Z-Wave is one standard--one of many. Who knows if it will become the dominant one? Parallel ports on PCs used to be ubiquitous, but now they're unused relics. Furthermore, I believe that the supposed benefits of home automation are mostly illusory or easily accomplished with existing products that are cheaper, more standardized, and ...


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Z wave is an industry consortium adopted set of technologies, and it's anybody's guess as to whether this will stay or not. I use this technology extensively at home, along with ZigBee, wi Fi and others. I like one piece of the puzzle that uses one technology, and I plug it in, generally technology agnostic. Having said that, I think this is going to be an ...


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As a general rule, Archon is correct -- it's better to implement a deadband as two sensors (one for the high setpoint and the other for the low setpoint) rather than relying on a timer to avoid short cycling and other such erratic behavior. If you cannot obtain dedicated fill pump controllers, but a NO and a NC float switch are available, a crude fill pump ...


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You are correct that a dead-band is needed to prevent the pump from constantly cycling on and off when it is near the set point. That is why these systems use a high and low float or sensor. It seems like you are making this way too difficult by timing the pump off instead of using a second float. A fill pump controller like this would do what you want. ...



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