Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

This heavily depends on your HA supervisor, for example with OpenHAB this can be done with the NetworkHealth binding : https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Network-Health-Binding. The key here is to know your devices IP Address and monitor it. Item in Openhab format: Switch Phone_WIFI "Phone 1" (Status, Network) { nh="192.168.1.101" } Switch ...


4

I never implemented something like this but I did implement something similar with other uses. I also asked a question here for automating parts of the home based on user that entered. It can be implemented using OpenHab with the NetworkHealth binding : https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Network-Health-Binding. There is no need to issue different ...


3

The following protocols are listed in Wikipedia: C-Bus: @wikipedia EnOcean: @wikipedia Insteon: @wikipedia KNX: @wikipedia UPB: @wikipedia X10: @wikipedia Zigbee: @wikipedia Z-Wave: @wikipedia In addition to these, I know there are the following systems: FS20 HomeEasy HomeMatic iComfort Kopp FreeControl Belkin WEMO: @wikipedia Intertechno ELRO ...


2

I've seen every type of "home automation light switch" system, but they all require some sort of "hub" by a company. Some communicate wirelessly and others do not. They also have varying levels of security. If you are still against a hub, there is one more option you have: Solid state relays. You can wire them inline before all your lights, then put an ...


2

OK, so you do have a security system with cellular notifications... You are probably aware you can add freeze sensors and flood sensors to communicate alerts through that system. That is at least some peace of mind if you're out of town and a pipe breaks or the furnace fails. But I have yet to hear of outdoor sprinkler system alerts. You might check with ...


2

Put the sensor in the space you are trying to light, and suddenly this "common need" becomes "not a need at all" which is why you can't find them, since that's how it's done, when done conventionally. Either move the switch into the room or get a remote sensor switch and put the sensor in the room.


2

Just found this Kwikset IoT lock. Differentiate inside/outside. * Touch to lock/open * Bluetooth phone or hardware token * Guest key possible. HTH,


1

There are some productive discussions here: http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=9980.0 http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/79794/determine-with-arduino-if-220v-ac-power-is-on-or-off A few ideas come to mind: 1) Stick an photosensor in front of the light connected to your home automation server. Advantage is that you don't need to modify the ...


1

There are certainly lots of systems which are basically just the controls and the hub which manages them. In some cases the hub has its own computer and software, in others (cheaper) it's just an interface that connects to a computer you supply; the programming info for those is generally available if you want to write your own software rather than using ...


1

The tone of your post scares me a little. Meaning if you are working in this box and cannot even identify the neutral, and are asking if one of the blacks is it, you should really get some experience or read up on basic home wiring before you start pulling things apart. Bottom line is, the bundle of spliced whites in the bak of the box is your neutral.


1

Doorbells generally run on 16-20 volts AC power. You can detect events using a microcontroller as seen here: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/96136/how-to-sense-24v-ac-thermostat-with-a-5v-microcontroller Some computers (Intel Edison, Raspberry Pi) both run linux and have GPIO inputs; otherwise you'll have to rig up a microcontroller and ...


1

All that Google has, from what I know (and googled to double check), is that they own Nest. They apparently had an "Android @ Home" project a few years ago, but I couldn't find any recent news on it. Personally I'd bank on Apple moving in on your home before Google-- simply because they already have their framework public, so developers can already start ...


1

There is an adapter that allows the Nest Thermostat, (or any other 24v thermostat), to control most brands of Mini Split A/C's and Heat Pumps. It is cheap and easy to install. It is made by "JP Manufacturing" and they can be found at NestMiniSplitAdapters.com . I have also seen them on Ebay lately. We retrofitted 26 mini splits at a hotel in Palm ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible