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5

This heavily depends on your HA supervisor, for example with OpenHAB this can be done with the NetworkHealth binding : https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Network-Health-Binding. The key here is to know your devices IP Address and monitor it. Item in Openhab format: Switch Phone_WIFI "Phone 1" (Status, Network) { nh="192.168.1.101" } Switch ...


4

I never implemented something like this but I did implement something similar with other uses. I also asked a question here for automating parts of the home based on user that entered. It can be implemented using OpenHab with the NetworkHealth binding : https://github.com/openhab/openhab/wiki/Network-Health-Binding. There is no need to issue different ...


3

Put the sensor in the space you are trying to light, and suddenly this "common need" becomes "not a need at all" which is why you can't find them, since that's how it's done, when done conventionally. Either move the switch into the room or get a remote sensor switch and put the sensor in the room.


2

One red wire on your dimmer should be connected to the supply from the wall live The other red should be connected to the load the one that switches the lamp on off Black should be connected to your neutral The Green should be connected to your bare conductors or earth (ground) As mentioned previously you should have as physically minimal copper exposed ...


2

There are numerous timer switches that replace a conventional switch in a wall box. For example, this is a seven day timer from Honeywell The wiring for simple timers is pretty straightforward. Usually you simply replace the existing switch and wire the new switch the same way. Often you need to add a neutral wire to the switch, and most recently wired ...


2

Just found this Kwikset IoT lock. Differentiate inside/outside. * Touch to lock/open * Bluetooth phone or hardware token * Guest key possible. HTH,


2

I've seen every type of "home automation light switch" system, but they all require some sort of "hub" by a company. Some communicate wirelessly and others do not. They also have varying levels of security. If you are still against a hub, there is one more option you have: Solid state relays. You can wire them inline before all your lights, then put an ...


1

As stated, this is not really possible with normal relay switches. you CAN however add a toggle relay board which will toggle each time it sensors state changes from the PIR or motion sensor. LINK HERE These boards can be found/built at any electronics store. You could probably find a commercial kit online somewhere (besides the provided link) In this ...


1

A switch like this either does not exist, or is not commercially available. It sounds like you need to teach the folks you live with (and maybe yourself), how to turn off lights when they (you) leave a room. Occupancy sensors; like the one you have, turn on when they detect motion, and have a delayed off when no more motion is detected. In some cases ...


1

The following protocols are listed in Wikipedia: C-Bus: @wikipedia EnOcean: @wikipedia Insteon: @wikipedia KNX: @wikipedia UPB: @wikipedia X10: @wikipedia Zigbee: @wikipedia Z-Wave: @wikipedia In addition to these, I know there are the following systems: FS20 HomeEasy HomeMatic iComfort Kopp FreeControl Belkin WEMO: @wikipedia Intertechno ELRO ...


1

There are certainly lots of systems which are basically just the controls and the hub which manages them. In some cases the hub has its own computer and software, in others (cheaper) it's just an interface that connects to a computer you supply; the programming info for those is generally available if you want to write your own software rather than using ...


1

The tone of your post scares me a little. Meaning if you are working in this box and cannot even identify the neutral, and are asking if one of the blacks is it, you should really get some experience or read up on basic home wiring before you start pulling things apart. Bottom line is, the bundle of spliced whites in the bak of the box is your neutral.


1

Doorbells generally run on 16-20 volts AC power. You can detect events using a microcontroller as seen here: http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/96136/how-to-sense-24v-ac-thermostat-with-a-5v-microcontroller Some computers (Intel Edison, Raspberry Pi) both run linux and have GPIO inputs; otherwise you'll have to rig up a microcontroller and ...


1

RCA audio cables are normally coaxial in construction, and are fine out to 50 feet or more, normally. I've run 100+ feet when needed for auditorium A/V setups. While there are fancier ways to go long distances, with modern equipment and cables there's little need for them in most cases. Most coaxial cable is not particularly suited to use as "output, ...


1

You can purchase and utilize a common DPDT type relay (Double Pole / Double Throw) to create a cross over switch. It is pretty easy to understand from the following relay diagram: You connect one circuit to the two NC (normally closed) terminals of the relay. The other circuit connects to the two COM (common) terminals. Then you add two additional wires ...


1

You could also consider replacing the switch with a motion-controlled/manual switch combo. Walk in the room and it turns on automatically. Turn it off manually when you go to bed. Bonus lower energy bill if you are forgetful like me.


1

I did exactly that some years ago, replacing the light switch with an X10 remotely controllable switch, and hang the remote on the wall at the other end of the room. However, that approach will NOT work with LED bulbs, due to the way it powers itself, and may not work safely with fluorescents. (X10 is the low-budget brand which introduced carrier-current ...


1

They've done the exact modification that you're proposing (placing it next to the door, rather than in the door) at my place of work. What you're looking for is called an 'electronic strike'. You cut out the area around the existing strike plate, and wire in the electronic strike. You'll need to feed it power, and a signal from whatever you have to ...


1

You moved the Green to C on one end but the picture with the transformer in the top left shows Green still on G there it should be on C. The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


1

There is an adapter that allows the Nest Thermostat, (or any other 24v thermostat), to control most brands of Mini Split A/C's and Heat Pumps. It is cheap and easy to install. It is made by "JP Manufacturing" and they can be found at NestMiniSplitAdapters.com . I have also seen them on Ebay lately. We retrofitted 26 mini splits at a hotel in Palm ...



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