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8

Short answer, you definitely want the patch panel, especially if you ran shielded cable. (If you did not run shielded cable, you probably don't want a shielded patch panel.) Male terminations are less reliable than punchdown connections. They tend to create marginal / intermittent failures in many cases, which can be particularly hard to track down. To ...


7

Couple of benefits of patch panels. They make the install neater. You could have the entire bundle of cables going to each room just terminated and hanging lose until it is needed. Or you can terminate them into a panel where they are tucked away. Also labeling the bundle of cables is problematic. Labels fall off and then you spend 10 minutes trying to ...


4

My own opinion on the pros and cons of a patch panel: Pros: Cleaner look Easier to locate a specific room's connection Easier to deal with non-connected rooms (think of a 5 port switch in a 10 room home with only needing to connect 3 of those rooms) Cons: Extra piece of equipment to install and clutter a tight networking space Extra possible failure ...


3

Yes, you have a couple different options in today's market. The cheapest would be a plug in timer that has to be manually set. As long as your schedule stays consistent, then this is a good option as it's well rounded and very useful. They make both ones with the push dials (as shown below) and ones with electronic displays, both are still relatively cheap. ...


3

Personally, I find little use or benefit to a patch panel in a home install. If using the correct connectors (ones rated for solid wires, or more typically for both solid and stranded wires, rather than the ones rated only for stranded wires) plug connections are quick and easy, and there's two fewer places to fail (the patch panel jack and the patch panel ...


3

Unfortunately, that style of wiring -- essentially a "switched loop" -- is not compatible with "smart" switches that require a neutral. The 2011 NEC finally recognized this and now requires neutral at switches, but your home obviously predates that requirement. There are a few options, but none are easy/cheap: New wire Replace the wire between switch ...


3

Put the sensor in the space you are trying to light, and suddenly this "common need" becomes "not a need at all" which is why you can't find them, since that's how it's done, when done conventionally. Either move the switch into the room or get a remote sensor switch and put the sensor in the room.


2

OK, so you do have a security system with cellular notifications... You are probably aware you can add freeze sensors and flood sensors to communicate alerts through that system. That is at least some peace of mind if you're out of town and a pipe breaks or the furnace fails. But I have yet to hear of outdoor sprinkler system alerts. You might check with ...


2

I have a similar situation in my restroom. My sensor is in the room and the time constant is 1 minute only. Each pulse of the motion sensor will reset the 1-minute timer, so after the door is closed from the outside (the last movement the sensor detects) the light will stay for 1 more minute and then be switched off. Everyone in the house is used to ...


2

All that Google has, from what I know (and googled to double check), is that they own Nest. They apparently had an "Android @ Home" project a few years ago, but I couldn't find any recent news on it. Personally I'd bank on Apple moving in on your home before Google-- simply because they already have their framework public, so developers can already start ...


2

Modern fridges only use $70 a year. So 2 hours a day, that a fridge is not opened, is less than penny a day.


2

I think you are trying to solve this "the old way", with some kind of centralized switching. Today, what you are calling in your post "CPU and modem" is typically accomplished by the addition of what has become VERY inexpensive microprocessors and single-chip radio transceivers. There are several examples of this even in the realm of devices for makers and ...


2

I'm not sure of particular products or solutions, but I will say that hardwiring any of it is quickly becoming obsolete. Technology will advance which will downsize the products and make everything more convenient. Right now there are already the Belkin switches that fit in a regular switch box, connect over wifi and with existing electrical wires, and can ...


1

If I understand your description, here is one way to alter your wiring: Basically you use the existing white wires to extend the neutral node everywhere. Use the black wires to extend the unswitched hot all the way to the Zwave. Use the red wire in the third leg to bring the switched hot back to the first two lamps, which have their hot sides connected ...


1

Wow! I hope you have some time to devote to this. This area has exploded in recent years with everybody and their mom getting into it. Basically you can do anything you have the desire (and money) to do. Here is just one web site of a group that has an open source agnostic home automation system. http://www.openhab.org Get youself an Arduino or ...


1

Are you talking about using a patch panel as opposed to just pulling a bundle of cables out of your wall into your switch? This is much more than an issue of convenience or cosmetics. The reason that permanently installed wiring is always terminated in outlets or patch panels is to protect it from flexing or bending when in use. (This is true of all ...


1

There are several emerging standards for home automation, but from looking online it seems like th GE bulbs use Zigbee 1.2. The Wink hub then serves as a bridge between that and your home wifi network. So if you want to communicate with the bulbs from a Raspberry Pi you will need to get a Zigbee module. If you want the Raspberry Pi to the communicate with ...


1

Practically speaking, this arrangement should work without an issue, as everything is on the same circuit and a smart-switch isn't going to draw enough current to significantly heat a metal box by induction. However, there are some very sticky Code-compliance issues involved with funky neutral routing -- the 300.3/300.20 mess is not at all clear, and if you ...


1

I havent installed but have seen them they have a special remote that has a reciever in the lighting device (switch) you can program the remote for different settings like when you stop a movie lights on full, pause at 50% play at 25% will look arround and see if i can find some brands for you to check out


1

@ 80% efficiency is just above 1/2 horsepower. The relay is just slightly too small in my opinion.


1

As per Z-Wave specification, no. A Z-Wave node (device) can only be paired to one hub (the designated 'primary' controller). 'Secondary' controllers added to the primary controller will lose their z-wave netword/added nodes and just act as a relay remote control. I don't believe adding the Wink Hub as a secondary controller is the option you're looking for ...



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