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You probably have a airlock in the pipes leading to the 3rd floor. If water can come out when you are bleeding then there is enough pressure. Close all other radiators and see if that will clear it. Otherwise the return pipe is not connected properly or just clogged. That is harder to fix.


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The fan should have a damper, as should the vent. If you insulate the pipe in between, that should go a long way in helping things. It won't be air tight, of course. It is a hole in your ceiling, after all. But it should help. Keep in mind that you're sucking way more heat out when the fan is on than is likely escaping the entire rest of the day. With ...


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You probably want to install some kind of a damper or louvers that will minimize air exchange through the vent when the fan is shut off, right? I would expect that the fan assembly itself might have a damper built into it, but maybe the housing is binding the damper. Or maybe it doesn't have one. http://www.batticdoor.com/bathfandraftblocker.html ...


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See if you can get some drywall scraps (you certainly don't want to buy a whole sheet for this) and fill in the corner, then fill the remaining gaps with drywall compound (both of which are fine with hot metal.) For a dire kludge if you can't manage to beg some scraps you could build up the whole thing from drywall tape and compound, but ANY place that's ...


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One thing you need to consider in the comparison between e-85 ethanol versus heating oil, propane, and natural gas, is that while the energy in Mega-Joules is higher for the last three, heating oil, propane, and natural gas all produce Carbon Monoxide and other waste products which have to be exhausted to the outdoors. A huge amount of heat (energy) is ...


2

Do you know the temperature of steam pipes? Do you know the ignition point of wood? Some say the "ignition" point of wood is 451 deg F. Most say around 570 deg F. Either way, the surface temperature of steam pipes will NEVER even get close to that. Typically upwards of 250 deg F. I think you can trust your plumber on this one.


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Probably not the answer you want to hear, but the manufacturer of your heater would most likely prohibit the alteration of air flow into and out of the unit. Doing so would void the industry safety certifications required for manufacturers, the warranty, and would probably not be safe. Additionally, all wall heaters have minimum clearance requirements for ...


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High limit switch, (example L240-30 ) it controls fan too, also it is a bimetal switch working on heat on and off and goes erratic.


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My top DIY that I've come up with: I sectioned the outside drain pipe and insulation so I can simply detach the sections if they clog with ice and take them inside to thaw in the tub/sink. Usually just the bottom piece. If the build up looks bad then I do #2. I also extended the vent pipe and use a funnel to pour hot water directly in to the drain from ...


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Right. I've seen this before. Some handyman put in a subpanel, but only ran 120V service to it (who knows why - saving money on wires? Expanding one wire feeding an outlet into a whole sub-panel?) and then jumpers the hots - which works OK if everything is 120V loads - which was probably the case when the panel was installed. This does, of course, mean that ...


2

I have an 1930's vinatge house w a glassed in front porch on the east side. I open those windows in the summertime. Otherwise the porch heats up to 115°F or so, and that heat comes through the limited, 1930's style, insulation into the living room, where I have to pump it back out with an AC. If I forget to close the porch windows in fall, winter makes the ...


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An enclosed porch can act as an oversized "storm window" for the part of the house it covers, so there is some insulation benefit. How much depends on how well the porch is air-sealed and insulated. It's probably a relatively small part of the surface of the house (unless it's a wrap-around porch), but it certainly won't hurt and, depending on prevailing ...


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If your porch gets any sun, it should help. My dad enclosed his each fall and opened it back up in the spring to let the breeze through. Worked great, but this was in the high desert where it would be sunny and below freezing at the same time.


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Unlikely. If your house is too cold in the winter, ans especially if it's very windy, you need to start by sealing off places where cold air is coming in. That will often help a ton. The next time it's very windy, just go around the house feeling for drafts and air currents. After doing that, you can then start to improve your house's insulation. The attic ...


0

Since it became cold enough for you to turn on your heat last night, other people probably did the same thing. This means a surge in load on your utility company's entire grid...and the grids it connects to. This can result in brownouts, greyouts, and blackouts within the utility company's service area. In the US, this is less common than other parts of the ...


3

This is definitely an issue with one of the legs of your main service. This pops up most commonly when the temperatures outside start to change and cause the wires to contract or expand. The power coming in to your house is normally fed by two separate wires, if one of these has become loose, you will see issues on about half the circuits in the house.


11

Sounds like a classic compromised leg of your main service. This problem could be anywhere from the connections at the utility transformer on the pole, to the connection taps on the side of the house, to the meter pan, to the main breaker. IMO this is NOT something for a DIY to troubleshoot since you would need to be testing live unfused wires in places ...


1

You should check closely on one or the other end of your electrical baseboard heater units. Sometimes these come with a thermostat built right into the end of the unit. It is a completely separate question as to whether a remote wall mounted thermostat is better than the one right on the heater unit. The wall thermostat can measure temperature away from ...


3

You could just turn the breaker on when you are cold, and off when you are hot, I suppose. If that gets inconvenient, yes, you'd need a thermostat. They do not normally "come with one" because one thermostat may control many heaters, or one thermostat and a bunch of relays may control even more heaters. Some units do come with one built into one end of ...


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I'd be rather surprised if your electric baseboard is actually 120V - that's fairly uncommon. 240V is much more common, without a neutral in normal use (ground, L1 (black) L2 (white, which should be taped/re-colored red, but often isn't) and 240V between L1 and L2. Whether the heater is actually 120V or 240V, the circuit is clearly in error if there is ...


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Yours may be different, but generally high temp limit switches look like this: Order the correct replacement online (if you can figure out the right one to get and have verified it has failed by testing for broken continuity) or take it to your local appliance parts supplier. Bring the model number of your unit with. "well 4 blinks is an open limit or ...


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It looks like Onix tubing, but installed incorrectly. If it is Onix then it does have an O2 barrier. It should be installed with special reusable crimp rings If it is Onix, the material is very reliable (when installed correctly).



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