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I'd suggest looking for a thermostat that supports remote sensors. I personally own ecobees which support up to 64 wireless sensors per unit. You can decide which of the sensors participate in measuring the average temperature for each time slot of the day. I believe Honeywell offers thermostats that support sensors as well in both the wired and wireless ...


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Search or shop for tension pole room divider for a solution that a child is unlikely to be able to move or tip over. If you want to do it yourself then you can first install four tension poles in a small rectangle and then screw or clamp three sections of plastic or metal screen to make a box-shaped barrier. All your screws or other fasteners go into the ...


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You could use a simple and cheap single double pole switch. In 1 position the system would use the hall thermostat in the other position the system would use the living room thermostat. The switch can be a very inexpensive one (spdt) with the common going to the furnace and the NO normally open to one. Then the NC normally closed to the other thermostat the ...


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You could surround it with a fence barrier that you attach to the wall, you can split it open and attach it to the walls on either side of the heater to provide a protective space (being sure to keep adequate clearance from the heater to the fence - one heater manufacturer recommends 3 feet in front and 12 inches to the sides of the heater): They are ...


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I'd place some sort of wall/fence around the outside. You could use two or three segments of a gate system like this: Or for a more DIY solution, you could build a fence on a plywood base with rubber feet to hold it in place. I would not recommend using heavy furniture to block access, as it will (1) block heat circulation and (2) in the event that your ...


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Not sure if this should be a comment or an answer. You will need something on top of the concrete but under the radiant tubing to reflect the heat upward. They do make a metal coated wood for that purpose that has channels already routed out for the tubing. It will ad to the height of your new finished floor. I assume your concrete is on top of earth or ...


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Pay now or pay later. Galvanized pipes inevitably fail over time because they crud up from the inside which constricts flow. This reduces the thickness of the wall, so if the flow doesn't get you, the failure of the wall will. Having said that, 3" is huge, so it would probably take a while before you noticed flow constriction. You'd still have a problem ...


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It has been my experience that these units are very air filter sensitive, i.e. if dirty or the wrong filter merv rating is used they will go into a limited mode - - - try changing the filter to a Merv 8 and see if it fires up normally .....


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My 12V DC Amplifier There are a huge number of completely different devices that can be described as an "amplifier". Only a subset of them operate using a 12V DC supply. Here is an example: However, it doesn't really matter, the advice below applies for any device which requires an input voltage of 12V DC How can I use my 12-DC amplifier at my house?...


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If your amp has a 220v input it would work other than that you will let the magic smoke out. If it is a 12 V model you will need a transformer to bring the 220 down and a rectifier to turn it back in to DC


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What I would do: Cut the long pipe. Move the radiator, making both cut pieces accessible. Remove and and discard both pieces of the long pipe. Unscrew the elbow-and-tee assembly from the radiator. Replace the short nipple with two short nipples connected by a union. Replace the long pipe with a longer pipe to account for the added length of the added ...


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"I'm not a plumber, nor a plumber's son..." but having watched them working with threaded pipe the trick seems to be finding the places where there is enough freedom for things to become longer (as the threads in both ends back out). In this case ... lemme check the photo again ... it looks like that coupling piece between the radiator and the L connector ...



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