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The only way to know the R-value of your wall is to know everything that was used to build it. Some of the ways you can determine this include by drilling a hole in it or looking behind an electrical outlet. That said, if your house is typical Canadian construction, here's my rough estimate: 1/2" drywall or plaster and lath: R-0.5 2x6 cavity filled with ...


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When wire is used for heating, it is important to ensure either that the wire is of very uniform thickness, or that it is constructed of an alloy whose electrical resistance decreases with heat and fed by a device that will limit current. If those conditions aren't met, the thinner portions of the wire are apt to heat up more than the thicker ones; if ...


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That's not the problem. The zone valve is not working. Zone valves stick either in the open or closed positions when they go bad. In your case bc heat won't go off its stuck in the open position. Need to replace zone valve


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Nobody has discussed the displacement issue. By filling up a pool with milk cartons (full enough to sink to the bottom) a lot of water would be pushed out when the jugs are placed in the pool, and will then require additional cold water from the water supply to be introduced to bring the water to the proper level, lowering the temperature even further. ...


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A ground-source heap pump is a custom-made-site-specific piece of equipment, and as such, will be more expensive and failure-prone. On the plus side, it will be more energy-efficient than the compressor of an air-source heat pump system. With today's super-efficient air-source heat pumps, you'd be looking at a coefficient of performance (COP) of ≤ 3 for ...


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The best (but not cheap) answer would be to make the two units separate heating zones, installing dampers (if forced-hot-air) or additional pumps and loops (if forced-hot-water) to direct heat only to the thermostat which is calling for it. That would give you full independent control within each space. Nothing else is likely to do so, I think.


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If you install two thermostats in series, they'll both have to be calling for heat for the heating to come on. For example if thermostat 1 is set to 80, and thermostat 2 is set to 75. When the temperature drops below 78, thermostat 1 will close and call for heat. However, the heating will not come on. When the temperature drops below 73, thermostat 2 will ...


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Assuming they are basic, analog/mechanical thermostats then yes, you can wire as many in series as you want. Heating will continue until the room with the lowest-set thermostat reaches that temperature. However, you must consider the whole-building heating process as just putting a 'stat in a random location could easily make the problem worse. It sounds ...


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You can install two sensors and remove the thermostat to an area of your control. The sensors are in series to the one thermostat.


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The item called a "fireplace heater" is the best option. I have seen them used, and have actually built one myself. I have experience as a welder so it was not a real chore to do. Several steel pipe are bent to conform to the dimensions of your fireplace, with the bottom of the "C" lying flat against the bottom of the FP. The top of the "C" should fit along ...


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You can want whatever you want to want, but that won't make it practical or efficient or cost-efficent (which comes back to practical.) There are at least 2 things that might be called a "solar tube" that come immediately to mind, and they are quite dissimilar. One is an "evacuated tube solar collector" and other other is a tubular skylight. I rather ...


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I presume this is a forced-hot-water system? The question is going to be whether the room was originally set up with a radiator, or if the plumbing was redone for the baseboard. If you're lucky it was the former, and the hot and return pipes come out relatively near to each other (with a return running the whole length of the baseboard to connect back to ...


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As a temporary solution you could cover the radiator with blankets or clothing to limit the amount of heat dissipation into the room. Don't worry, hot water/steam heating systems do not get hot enough to ignite combustible materials. If you cannot get the valve repaired or replaced, then you may want to pick up some foam insulation boards and duct tape ...


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Yes: read the manuals here: http://www.woodboilers.com/discontinued-boilers.html and you'll see some of the issues. The key difficulties are: Regulation of a wood-fired furnace is a very non-linear process, and depends a lot on what fuel is already in the furnace and how it is burning. You don't say what happens when the limit switch gets hit. Some ...


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You probably have a airlock in the pipes leading to the 3rd floor. If water can come out when you are bleeding then there is enough pressure. Close all other radiators and see if that will clear it. Otherwise the return pipe is not connected properly or just clogged. That is harder to fix.


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The fan should have a damper, as should the vent. If you insulate the pipe in between, that should go a long way in helping things. It won't be air tight, of course. It is a hole in your ceiling, after all. But it should help. Keep in mind that you're sucking way more heat out when the fan is on than is likely escaping the entire rest of the day. With ...



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