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1

You just need a multi pole switch. If you are using a T-stat that uses batteries you may only be using two wires to actuate the circuit. In that case get a double pole double throw switch. (If you are using three wires you will need a triple pole double throw.) Like this one. Connect your thermostat to the center terminals and the boiler and the wood ...


0

It's all about heat load. A very well insulated building may have a heat load so low that most boilers would be operating very inefficently to meet the load - sitting idle most of the time, even on "design days" when the heat load is at the greatest due to the outside temperature being the lowest temperature designed for (thus, "design day.") As a ...


3

Providing general wind break in the area will help. Regarding flow, you don't necessarily have to block where flow enters; you can also block the escape. I don't think it would hurt to plant some evergreen shrubs along the side of the wall and perhaps some trees around other areas of the (north) yard. A small fence around this area immediately in front of ...


0

Modifications to the flue are likely to be unwise and may be counterproductive or cause your heater to be dangerous or fail any safety checks. There are fairly strict back pressure requirements for proper function. Even some models from 20 years ago recaptured some of the waste heat into the incoming air (concentric balanced flue).


5

It is generally not worth the time and money to try to capture the lost heat through the exhaust system of the vast majority of tankless/on-demand water heaters. The heaters are now so efficient that they can vent the exhaust through plastic (PVC) pipe. Since these heaters also only operate when there is a call for hot water, they do not run very often. ...


0

Since this is a new-build, I would focus really hard on passive solar design. This is a new concept of building, with different materials and practices - it's not a glue-on afterthought to a conventionally built house). This type of design is likely to be earth sheltered, heavily insulated, have huge thermal mass inside the insulation envelope, windows ...


1

If the upstairs is truly another zone there should be a separate damper to close it off or reduce the flow. Zoned means you have separate control over different areas. Sounds like you either need to adjust the existing damper or install one. Good luck!


2

Shutting some internal doors might help. Especially the door to the room upstairs with the return vent, to avoid pulling hot air upstairs. Anywhere air can get out upstairs (e.g. bathroom extractors, trickle vents) can encourage convection too. If there's heat in the downstairs hallway you might want to restrict it. I have had to do this with our (wet) ...


0

This could also be caused if your thermostat is in the warmest room of the house. Or if the thermostat is constantly near warm objects like electronics or even people. When it is really cold outside those heat sources are less effective at influencing the thermostat.


2

Just a guess, but the colder it gets the longer the boiler cycles and the hotter the delivery water temperature gets so therefore the radiators get hotter before the thermostat shuts the boiler off. In moderate temperatures, the thermostat shuts the boiler off before it gets very warm and so your radiators are barely above room temperature. Check to see if ...


1

For 30 years we had an old round mercury thermostat. It worked great. Then we bought a new Trane furnace with a new digital honeywell stat like the one above. The new stat freezes. It's programed and constantly gets stuck on the previous setting and doesn't adjust when it's supposed to unless I press a button, any button, then it wakes up and almost like it ...



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