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I'm guessing it's the opposite (or same) reason as this question. Some libraries have a listing room, you could try that but I don't think it's going to work. You have to be 'getting ready for bedtime'. Until your brain shuts down enough, it strains to adapt its sensitivity to the room level. I'd say this happens to everyone, except I'm biased as a ...


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Yes. The coil[s] can be replaced. I've done mine twice. Coil failure indicates inefficient venting, so it's worth looking at the the vents while doing the job.


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I have this problem in many of the 100+ units I own in northern New York, sometimes with soot very dark and looking like there was a fire, sometimes faint. There is nothing in our baseboard electric heaters to burn. We therefore assume the soot is from air born dust cooking off of the heater fins.


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The most honest answer is, "it doesn't matter." Assuming the worst case scenario that there is no insulation of any sort beneath the pipes, a flooring material with a lower thermal conductivity will cause a small amount of the heat to be directed downwards rather than upwards, but we're probably talking about a difference in the number of watts/BTUs that can ...


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Aside from the factors mentioned by "Some Guy", note that the relatively still air next to surfaces also has an insulating value. A rough estimate for many common cases would be about 0.1 m^2K/W. For thin assemblies, this air film dominates the total heat transfer and means the insulating value of the materials themselves have very little impact on the ...


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Respectfully, you are trying to compare apples to autos here. Burning gas makes things hot. Thermal conductivity is just how fast it takes the heat to get to you. I suggest you go try to calculate it from theory, physics is fun, calculus is interesting, the numbers will not lie to you, and you will see the logical error immediately. The heat has to go ...


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The simplest thing to do is to paint it the same color as whatever it is running next to. It won't completely hide it but it will go unnoticed by some people. Keeping it low and parallel to the floor might help too. If you're not willing to build anything around it, then also try to take advantage of your layout and furniture to hide it. Also consider ...


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You might just have to box around it, if you can mount it right against the wall, fairly low. If the line is the old black iron gas pipe, you don't have to worry about it getting crushed if something gets dropped on it. But you might have to worry about damage to the connections (and leaks) if something heavy enough is dropped on it. If it's the yellow (or ...


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We built a bucket truck garage two years ago. It has a 13' ceiling with a 5' stuccoed concrete block wall and ordinary 2"x6" studs above that. And of course the 4:12 pitch roof adds another 2' average height above that. A 15' ceiling leaves a lot of air space overhead to heat before the rest of the garage is comfortable. The garage has a 10'x10' insulated ...


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Convection in a stairway, in a reasonably tight house, is way overrated. Given the square footage of wall and ceiling space - I do not see how the stairway makes much difference. I run a fan 24/7 at the bottom of my stairs, adjust vents to the seasons, and still can not seem to get my system to play nice. I do have a single zone forced air, so it is not a ...



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