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My heat cables are temperature-controlled. They turn on when temperatures drop below 38 °F and turn off when they rise above 50 °F, so I turn them on prior to the first freeze and will keep them on until night time temperatures stay above 45 °F for a while. It takes time for them to warm up and the units I have were fixed-temperature, with no ...


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Probably not, but... You'll need to read the literature that undoubtedly came with your heat cable (or, at a minimum, share with us what product you're using). Generally, they shouldn't be left on continuously, and they shouldn't be on when outdoor temperatures get above 30 degrees F, give or take. What cycle you need depends on the local climate, current ...


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Heat tape will keep the hose from freezing (where it's attached) but there are other freezing risks... e.g. where are the pipes coming from? Do they go into the uninsulated wall? Also there is still water inside the washing machine itself that can freeze. Frankly installing a washing machine in a cold, unheated garage was not a great idea. I think you need ...


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There is a product called heat tape. It plugs into a wall outlet and usually has a small thermostat built in. I have used it on PVC & Metal water lines even 1 hose outside. Not sure if it will work on rubber but it comes in as short as 3’ sections. I use strapping tape to hold it in place. Most home stores will have it called heat tape or heat cable 3M ...


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Instead of a space heater, try some pipe heating cable. This is a simple electric resistance heater that is designed to be wrapped around pipes in order to prevent freezing. The good ones have a thermostat built-in, so they'll only kick on if necessary. You wrap the cable around your pipes, apply insulation over the wrapped pipes, and plug it in. This ...


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Ok - when unmounting the thermostat, I noticed the manufacturer's name (Danfoss), and from that I was able to find the valve type, which is Danfoss RAVL


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On the existing valve, you loosen or remove the screw. This will allow the fingers under the grey strap to expand, allowing you to just pull the thermostat off. To install your thermostat, move the metal ring down. It might actually be threaded, so turning it may be required. Push it on to the radiator, and move/turn the metal ring back in to place.


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The fact that one branch duct is at the end doesn't mean much. You could install a damper there to balance flow a bit. Of bigger concern is that they used flex duct and bent it severely. If the one in the photo is any indication, they didn't do a great job. You shouldn't see such sharp, tight bends. It also doesn't appear that flex duct was necessary ...


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At least your heat is under the floor. Here in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon) many houses have radiant ceiling heat, same thing but in the ceiling. Kind of goofy to put it in the ceiling since heat rises but even that works. The 1 advantage is the room will feel warm with no air blowing. Some of the disadvantages are a nail driven into the cable will kill a ...


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The largest water heater coils I could find are 4.5 KW that translates to less than 16,000 BTU/hr. So, if your heater has two of those at 9 KW you could provide 32,000 BTU/hr. That would be enough to heat a small well-insulated house. However, electric water heaters would be a 1 to 1 ratio of KW's to BTU's. Now, a geothermal heat pump could get you up to a ...


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Sounds like a dead thermostat. When it was working before, it hadn't died yet. Why it died is likely to remain a mystery. Things don't live forever (neither do people - dragons might, per one song.) Replace it.


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I have a wood stove in the lower floor of my house. I cut a vent size opening and installed a temperature activated fan that blew the heat into the intake duct. I started out with just the opening but found the fan made a big difference. When I ran my stove I turned the furnace fan on and the wood stove kept the house warm. On really cold days or if I was ...


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Hydronic heaters are typically pressurized to 15psi, and use thinner copper tubing; there's a pressure reducing valve. Hot water heaters operate at city water pressure which can be more than double that. So while you could theoretically pump water from the HW heater to heating system, you'd have to worry that there were iron pipes and pumps, and that ...


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It's actually not uncommon to use a water heater for heating a well-insulated building (though an electric water heater is very UN-common, due to operating cost.) But.... This is not commonly done with radiators, which are typically designed to operate on 180F water. It is much more common with radiant floor heating, which can function quite well down at ...


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Your proposal seems sound in principle. But then, in principle, you could heat your house with hair dryers if that's all you had. Some things to consider: A typical home heating furnace is about five times as powerful as a typical water heater. For example, my furnace is 150,000 BTU/hr and my water heater is 40,000 BTU/hr. So a re-purposed water heater ...


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Sure, it would work in general principle. The "currency" here is hot water. Any way you can heat it, is fair game. You'd have a practical issue in actually doing it though: sizing. You wouldn't find a tanked hot water heater with a large enough heating element to heat a whole house. So at normal pumping rates, your radiators would be tepid at best. So ...


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They look like expanded stainless steel and that would make them completely reusable. I would hose them off and put them back in and save yourself some money. Unless you are sensitive and need a HEPA style filter these should work fine for most dust and hair.


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You could use either an on-demand water heater or a standard one if you want to keep 20-40 gallons of water hot on hand. The big thing is they will not run as hot as a boiler. However, running pex tubing in concrete doesn't require the water to be as hot as perimeter or radiator hot water heat as long as you leave it on long enough to heat the concrete up to ...


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Since this seems to be an ongoing problem for you, I might suggest a somewhat more formal approach to it. For instance, use magnets to attach toweling to the top of the radiator shell and let the duble-thickness of that towelling (magnet inside the fold) drape all the way to the floor - that should basically shut-down air flow through the radiator from top ...


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In Russia, they just left the windows open. A photo would help. In general your towels or foil are safe to use, the towels will probably work best. You want to block airflow as much as possible, then, once that's good have an insulating layer. Or just a good talk with building maintenance about installing a flow restriction device on your line. A down ...


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Maybe you can remove the skirting from the wall to the right of the hallway, chase pipes into the wall from existing radiator up to intersection with breakfast-room and kitchen and have radiators on the other side of the walls left and right of that intersection. You can buy skirting boards / capping designed to cover pipes fixed to the wall.


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Sounds like you have a hard-to-find or hidden shut-off valve in the pipe for the back of the house that someone closed to save money. If the front of the house is heating then the pump is working, which means it is not air-locked and you separator is working fine. If you have vertical radiators, there might be a bleed valve at a high point in the back ...


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Use plug-in oscillating ceramic element space heaters with electronic thermostat control, you just leave them on with the temperature set. Quiet, efficient, effective, and not hot to the touch. No invasive plumbing or wiring. We use one in the guest house main room (400 sq/ft) and it's nice and toasty all winter.


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If you prefer a fast and simple solution to heat the rooms I would suggest electric baseboards as a heating source. They install along most any approved wall and are available in different voltage. All that is needed is a electric source to tap into.


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You can use a Dryer Heat Diverter: I've used one for 30 years; in the summer you vent the dryer to the outside, and in the winter you vent it to the space to be heated. For a large garage, the extra humidity in winter won't make a difference. You get about 10k BTUs per run.


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Check your local building/fire codes. Here in Ontario, Canada, blocking any possible flow of carbon monoxide from an attached garage to the house proper is a major concern. Taped drywall joints, taping of any electrical boxes, sealing of any penetrations, self-closing passage doors to the house are all mandated. A 3 or 4 inch duct leading directly to the ...


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I had the problem here in NE Ohio. Had the ancient furnace replaced with a energy efficient one. The guys installed it, took the old drain line and reconnected my new furnace to it. The frigid cold weather arrived and bingo, came home to a wet carpet and the condensation pump screaming up a storm. I do not have a drain next to the furnace. Well, I called ...


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Ice forms in that location because 1) heat is lost where the two panes of glass are connected by the metal frame, and 2) cold air sinks to the bottom of the window opening. I don't see any red flags that indicate air leakage or other serious issues. The fact that the entire glass pane frosts up at times reinforces that position. You have simple heat ...


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Dryer air is hot, but more importantly, it is very moist. The high humidity might not be a huge issue when it's cold outside, but when it warms up, it could lead to mold or other moisture related issues. Also, even though your dryer does attempt to catch lint on its internal lint screen, some dust is present in the exhaust air which will eventually cause a ...


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Is the entire cord heating uniformly, or is one particular spot (e.g. the plug) getting notably warmer than the rest? Hotspots are Very Bad. Replacement plugs are about $4. Replacement outlets are about 75 cents. But if it is merely a case of the entire cord being slightly warm, that could simply be the manufacturer using the thinnest wire allowed (e.g. ...


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I grew up for a time in a house smaller than yours, 1000ft with two bedrooms, in the Pacific Northwest. Insulation was pretty much non existant. We did heat the entire house with a woodstove. It wasn't a huge unit, and you could certainly get an insert with a lot more heat. I believe you could (depending on where you live) heat your house with a gas insert, ...


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I have an Empire brand 65,000 btu input free standing stove with blower that heats my house (about 1,000 sq.ft.) and it heats it quite well during our sometimes extremely cold northern Michigan winters. We're talking some -20 plus wind chill days where it runs every 10 minutes but it does the job. Now this is an old house which has been insulated but there ...



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