Hot answers tagged

5

Dryer air is hot, but more importantly, it is very moist. The high humidity might not be a huge issue when it's cold outside, but when it warms up, it could lead to mold or other moisture related issues. Also, even though your dryer does attempt to catch lint on its internal lint screen, some dust is present in the exhaust air which will eventually cause a ...


3

It's actually not uncommon to use a water heater for heating a well-insulated building (though an electric water heater is very UN-common, due to operating cost.) But.... This is not commonly done with radiators, which are typically designed to operate on 180F water. It is much more common with radiant floor heating, which can function quite well down at ...


3

Since this seems to be an ongoing problem for you, I might suggest a somewhat more formal approach to it. For instance, use magnets to attach toweling to the top of the radiator shell and let the duble-thickness of that towelling (magnet inside the fold) drape all the way to the floor - that should basically shut-down air flow through the radiator from top ...


2

In Russia, they just left the windows open. A photo would help. In general your towels or foil are safe to use, the towels will probably work best. You want to block airflow as much as possible, then, once that's good have an insulating layer. Or just a good talk with building maintenance about installing a flow restriction device on your line. A down ...


2

All of the air that blows out of your vents to heat or cool a room has to go somewhere. That somewhere is the large air return vent. When you close the door to a room, and there's not much of a gap under the door, the air blowing from the vents doesn't have any where to go (you just sealed the air's access to the return vent which is probably in a hallway ...


2

I have a wood stove in the lower floor of my house. I cut a vent size opening and installed a temperature activated fan that blew the heat into the intake duct. I started out with just the opening but found the fan made a big difference. When I ran my stove I turned the furnace fan on and the wood stove kept the house warm. On really cold days or if I was ...


1

Sounds like a dead thermostat. When it was working before, it hadn't died yet. Why it died is likely to remain a mystery. Things don't live forever (neither do people - dragons might, per one song.) Replace it.


1

Hydronic heaters are typically pressurized to 15psi, and use thinner copper tubing; there's a pressure reducing valve. Hot water heaters operate at city water pressure which can be more than double that. So while you could theoretically pump water from the HW heater to heating system, you'd have to worry that there were iron pipes and pumps, and that ...


1

They look like expanded stainless steel and that would make them completely reusable. I would hose them off and put them back in and save yourself some money. Unless you are sensitive and need a HEPA style filter these should work fine for most dust and hair.


1

Standard diesel fuel and home heating oil are basically the same thing. Sometimes kerosene is added to home heating fuel to keep it from gelling. I actually put the cetane additive into my heating fuel for this reason due to my tank being above ground. It won't hurt anything to put 10 gallons of diesel into your tank to keep you going until you can get fuel ...


1

I had the problem here in NE Ohio. Had the ancient furnace replaced with a energy efficient one. The guys installed it, took the old drain line and reconnected my new furnace to it. The frigid cold weather arrived and bingo, came home to a wet carpet and the condensation pump screaming up a storm. I do not have a drain next to the furnace. Well, I called ...


1

I have an Empire brand 65,000 btu input free standing stove with blower that heats my house (about 1,000 sq.ft.) and it heats it quite well during our sometimes extremely cold northern Michigan winters. We're talking some -20 plus wind chill days where it runs every 10 minutes but it does the job. Now this is an old house which has been insulated but there ...


1

Maybe you can remove the skirting from the wall to the right of the hallway, chase pipes into the wall from existing radiator up to intersection with breakfast-room and kitchen and have radiators on the other side of the walls left and right of that intersection. You can buy skirting boards / capping designed to cover pipes fixed to the wall.


1

Use plug-in oscillating ceramic element space heaters with electronic thermostat control, you just leave them on with the temperature set. Quiet, efficient, effective, and not hot to the touch. No invasive plumbing or wiring. We use one in the guest house main room (400 sq/ft) and it's nice and toasty all winter.


1

If you prefer a fast and simple solution to heat the rooms I would suggest electric baseboards as a heating source. They install along most any approved wall and are available in different voltage. All that is needed is a electric source to tap into.


1

Ice forms in that location because 1) heat is lost where the two panes of glass are connected by the metal frame, and 2) cold air sinks to the bottom of the window opening. I don't see any red flags that indicate air leakage or other serious issues. The fact that the entire glass pane frosts up at times reinforces that position. You have simple heat ...


1

Check your local building/fire codes. Here in Ontario, Canada, blocking any possible flow of carbon monoxide from an attached garage to the house proper is a major concern. Taped drywall joints, taping of any electrical boxes, sealing of any penetrations, self-closing passage doors to the house are all mandated. A 3 or 4 inch duct leading directly to the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible