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Respectfully, you are trying to compare apples to autos here. Burning gas makes things hot. Thermal conductivity is just how fast it takes the heat to get to you. I suggest you go try to calculate it from theory, physics is fun, calculus is interesting, the numbers will not lie to you, and you will see the logical error immediately. The heat has to go ...


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a heat pump has a cop or coefficient of performance. Your 48000 BTU Heat pump delivers that much heating nominally with mild temperatures outside.. To see how much power it uses you divide by COP and then convert to kWh. In my area natural gas is about half the cost of baseboard heating, and heat pump heat is half the cost of gas heat. In the winter it is ...


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While I have not ben able to find an example of a hardwired baseboard electric heater failing in this manner on a quick search of the web, here's a story about a freestanding but otherwise similar unit making lots of soot. The only way I can envision an electric baseboard making as much soot as you have described (short of filling it with flammables) is if ...


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Building Air Standard (BAS) is sometimes referred to as BAS - ACH This appears to be a (I begin to think deliberately, after quite a few vague web results) slippery number to track down, but it appears to be essentially an estimation of "natural air changes per hour" based on the blower door test. Simply calling it "Estimated ACH" would apparently be too ...


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You might just have to box around it, if you can mount it right against the wall, fairly low. If the line is the old black iron gas pipe, you don't have to worry about it getting crushed if something gets dropped on it. But you might have to worry about damage to the connections (and leaks) if something heavy enough is dropped on it. If it's the yellow (or ...


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We built a bucket truck garage two years ago. It has a 13' ceiling with a 5' stuccoed concrete block wall and ordinary 2"x6" studs above that. And of course the 4:12 pitch roof adds another 2' average height above that. A 15' ceiling leaves a lot of air space overhead to heat before the rest of the garage is comfortable. The garage has a 10'x10' insulated ...


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Convection in a stairway, in a reasonably tight house, is way overrated. Given the square footage of wall and ceiling space - I do not see how the stairway makes much difference. I run a fan 24/7 at the bottom of my stairs, adjust vents to the seasons, and still can not seem to get my system to play nice. I do have a single zone forced air, so it is not a ...


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The furnace tech indicated it was an improperly connected pipe used for bleeding air from the system, and it was also unnecessary as we have bleeder valves on the hot water circuits. They removed the pipe and plugged it, and we haven't had an issue since.



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