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19

Yes, reversing them would be a bad thing. The cold water should be entering the bottom of the tank, the hot output at the top: I'd insist that the plumber fix this. But if they won't, I'd suggest picking up a pipe cutter, some sharkbite connectors, and just fix it yourself. Shouldn't take more than a half hour to do so.


7

RTFM After reading the user manual for this heater, as per National Electrical Code. National Electrical Code 2011 ARTICLE 110 Requirements for Electrical Installations I. General 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment. (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in ...


6

If your carbon monoxide alarm is going off, you need to assume that there's actually carbon monoxide in dangerous levels in that area. If the heater is electric it probably shouldn't be emitting CO but maybe there's a manufacturing defect that's causing the heating element or plastic to burn. CO is lethal and totally undetectable by people, so if the alarm ...


5

The first thing to do is verify where the leak is occuring. It could be occuring higher up and just dripping from the fitting (though it is very likely that it is the fitting leaking). Dry the entire pipe off and then watch for water. Assuming it is the compression fitting, the first thing I'd try is tightening it by 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn. As gregmac ...


4

For starters, I'd suggest you shut down the heater, drain it completely, and replace both electrodes. The danger with a water heater this old is that in draining it and dislodging sediment within you could expose small leaks. At 16 years old, I hate to say it, but you'll probably find it more efficient just to replace it.


4

While the lower end hotair guns often only have one or two settings, the more expensive models offer variable increments (I've seen units that do 50 degrees and a commenter mentioned 10 degrees; each model will be different so review the specs). The temperature spec gives the output temperature. Start low and increase the temperature as needed to melt the ...


4

The most important issue in a portable heater, even before the issue of heating is safety. Dangers involve tipping, brushing a hot surface, things falling into, in or on it. This risk is even more pronounced in a kitchen which is a busy place (unlike a quite reading room). People move about, often quickly and carry (and drop) things. While your particular ...


4

A larger tank does not cost more energy. The only thing that costs energy is when the water cools - and that depends only on the surface area, not the amount of water in the tank. (Mathematically volume increases by the 3rd power, but surface area only by the 2nd power.) So to save energy add extra insulation around the tank. Reducing the amount of water in ...


3

In this case, it looks like you'll have to run a new 20A circuit. As per Article 110.3(B) of the National Electrical Code (NEC), and the manufacturers instructions. NEC 2008 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment. (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with ...


3

You're asking the wrong question. The circuit breaker size is based on the wiring size, not on the application size. The purpose of the circuit breaker is to protect the wiring from fire. A better question would be "what size wiring do I need for an 18 amp load?" Then you can work out the circuit breaker, receptacle, etc. afterward, based on @HerrBag's ...


2

On second review of the photos, I don't think that the corrosion is due to electrolysis. The dielectric nipples should be adequate to prevent that and there is no sign of issues with the hot connection. As for the T&P connection, if the copper drain pipe does not come into contact with anything then there is no closed circuit for electrolysis to take ...


2

I'm thinking that the installation is missing this dialectic union. Your "dialectric" nipple has an ABS plastic coating inside a galvanized steel pipe. If the dialectic union were used in conjunction with this nipple it would provide electrical isolation from the copper - galvanize connection. This document explains this in better detail.


2

I really question the wisdom of switching just the lower heating element. Doing so is going to overwork the upper element. I assume you are trying to conserve electricity, but this tactic is not going to be a great benefit to you. The upper element is used as the "quick recovery" unit that gives the cooling water from the lower part of the tank a boost as ...


2

I wonder.....are there some water headers made where the cold water dip tube can be dropped into either pipe from the top of the unit? Strange I know answering a question with another question. Such swappable scheme would lend itself to some replacement installations where the Hot/Cold lines of the existing plumbing are opposite to the factory default ...


2

I'm not sure why you have 3 switches, and only 2 12/2 cables. But I'll give it a stab anyway. The fan unit should have 1 Red wire. 1 Black wire. 1 Blue wire. 2 White wires. 1-3 Green or Bare wires. The red wire in the unit should control the heat, so you'll hook the black from one switch to the red wire of the unit, and the white wire from the same ...


2

You can install an insulating cover on the inside of the unit. Some vendors caution against using outside covers unless the unit has been cleaned and drained first.


2

For a short term need where you'll turn on the heater when you need it and turn it off again shortly afterwards, you're probably going to be best off with some form of radiant heat. This type of heater will emit most of its heat as infrared radiation that you can direct toward wherever you're standing. A typical radiant heater will have ceramic coated or ...


2

If you remove one, the other may not be able to handle the heating demand. This could lead to a cold room, and/or a shortened life of the heater. If you still want to proceed. Shut off the breaker, and disconnect the second heater as close to the breaker as you can. Don't just cut the wires, disconnect them at a splice point inside a junction box. Cap all ...


2

Sizing conductors and breakers Almost all wire you can buy will be rated at 600 volts, so you won't have to worry about voltage when sizing wires. What really matters is current. Your wires will be sized to carry enough current for the load, and your breaker will be sized based on the wire used. When installing electrical devices, it's always a good idea ...


2

The recent studfinders have voltage detectors that are more reliable than the stud detection. Verify you have heater wire with a helper switching off the breaker while you have it under the detector. You may have to install a junction box to get enough slack or run a new wire from the t-stat to to the heater.


1

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


1

Assuming it's a hot-water baseboard heater, there should be no problem from which way the water goes. It's a rather simple machine (pipe with heat dissipators) so it couldn't care less which direction the hot water is flowing. What could be an issue is if a bleeder valve was installed on the output side and not the intake side. Typically the intake side ...


1

My furnace controller has an "accessory" terminal that carries 120VAC whenever the blower is on. I wired a receptacle to this terminal so that noisy accessories (namely a drum humidifier and a condensate pump) only come on when the blower is on. My blower is loud enough to mask the sounds of the accessories. Maybe yours is, too.


1

This type of radiator should be warm to the touch, not hot like an cast iron radiator. If you touch the fins with two or three fingers it should feel hot enough to be very uncomfortable. Lastly, go to incoming pipe coming up through the floor again, it should be very hot, too hot to touch for more than a few seconds. Usually the water moving through the ...


1

I think the key to the problem you're having is found in the following paragraph from the article that you linked to in your answer: In systems where the same thermostat controls cast-iron radiators and baseboard convectors, consumers are typically unhappy with the comfort from baseboards as compared with radiators, due mostly to the difference in ...


1

I read this article about the differences b/n baseboard and radiator and it seems to me that there are two issues: 1) The perception that you get from the two heating bodies is different, the cast iron radiators just give a sense of warmth. 2) The radiators are radiating heat long after the furnace is off unlike the baseboard heater. In addition to that ...


1

Leave it alone. The inlet and outlet threads on your water heater are plastic. It's a one time deal, you've got to do it right the first time. Wait until you need to replace the water heater. Use all copper next time. Mineral deposits can be sign of leakage, but sometimes the deposits seal the leak.


1

Simple "line voltage" T stat wiring. One wire is L1 (120V potential) from source, one wire is L2(120v potential)source connected to heating strips, then the switch, then L1 source. When the switch closes the 240V circuit is completed. If you have 240V when checking both wires together, and only two wires on switch, there is something wrong with the new fancy ...


1

That will be a fun little project. I wouldn't get overly concerned about the voltage on those wires. You're safest bet is to use a small relay to isolate that part of the circuit. Choose a relay with contacts rated for 120V and 1A and you should be good to go. This will allow you to be very flexible in your choice of coil voltage and how you drive the ...


1

I think it is one of two things. The element is getting old and between the age and the moisture in the bathroom has taken the element close to end life. The heater is 240V and maybe the breaker needs reset or it has gone bad or there is a bad connection in the heater. I've seen wire connections fry pretty bad in some cases. If it is the element and ...



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