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6

I tend to pour a cup of bleach down the line once a month. Without that at least in Florida you WILL get an algae backup in the line, which if you have bad overflow sensor can cause all kinds of fun water problems. If it is already blocked, just pour the bleach and let it sit. Eventually enough algae will die and the block will clear itself out.


6

Can you do this? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! Aside from (likely multiple) code violations you will never filter the lint out and will create a dangerous situation inside the furnace plenum, aside from clogging the furnace filter probably weekly.


5

The reason furnaces (as opposed to heat pumps) keep running is to cool them back off since the burner is pretty hot. It may be a safety issue (too much undistributed heat could make the furnace hot to the touch and possibly result in a fire), but I suspect it's also done to extend the life of the furnace from large temperature swings with the side benefit of ...


4

Based on the comments, I think you are talking about the condensation line from the air handler. For the condensate, you shouldn't need to worry about bacteria. It's not like you are drinking from it, and it doesn't form a pool of stagnant water in your system (unless it is plugged). You do need to worry if the condensation line gets plugged up, however. ...


4

If both your central air handling fan and outdoor compressor are running and your not seeing any sort of cooling after a 10-20 minutes than I'd venture a guess and say it's time to call an AC repair service. I'm curious what you are pushing in that makes the compressor turn on? Are you somehow bridging the main capacitor? Capacitors tend to be a common ...


4

You need to restrict the flow through that duct, either by installing a damper like this in the duct, or by installing an adjustable register at the duct outlet, and closing it off until you get similar flow out of all three ducts.


4

You should contact an Electrician or HVAC technician. There seems to be a short-circuit somewhere in the circuit supplying the heating unit. DO NOT reset the breaker again until the problem is fixed. The reason I suspect a short-circuit, is because the breakers are reacting so quickly. If this was an overcurrent situation, the main breaker would likely ...


3

Heat pump? Keep salt away from the unit. Salt will attack and totally decompose the fins and will create electrolytic corrosion in the joints between aluminum and copper leading to destruction of the system. Icing during operation in a damp climate is normal, it's supposed to have a defrost cycle it runs through to remove the ice. Heat Pump Operation: ...


3

Warm climates are good candidates for heat pumps. Heat pumps have more efficiency in heating mode when the ambient temperature is warmer, less efficiency when the ambient temperature is colder. If the outside temp falls too low, the heat pump stops providing useful heat. This is why heat pumps are often supplemented by "emergency" electric heaters that ...


3

Some newer compressors have a built-in delay to protect them from damage. You should check the number of recommended cycles per hour in the manual to find out if this is an issue for your unit. Damage could be caused by overheating over time, or a flooded start - depending on the design of the unit.


3

You're right, but only because oil is the worst, most expensive way to heat a home. Pretty much anything beats it, except maybe electric resistance in places with high electricity prices. Wood, gas, and heat pump electric will all beat the pants off oil. That said, even 80% efficiency may be optimistic for a modern high efficiency wood stove. But even if ...


3

What you’re describing sounds like a combination of negative pressure in the compartment that the drain pan connected to and an incorrectly sized p-trap on the condensate drain. The depth of the t-prap has to be greater than the negative pressure in inches of water column of the compartment where the drain is connected to. A t-prap with insufficient depth, ...


2

Sounds like the ducts expanding and popping against themselves and the wood framing as they heat up. If that's the case, it's nothing to be concerned of since they are designed to expand/contract.


2

ice usually means either your air handler isn't pushing enough air across the coil, or your system is out of refrigerant. so first step is to set the cool/off switch to off. then set your fan switch to on. if the air handler fan does not turn on, then you have a problem with your air handler or thermostat. possibly cheap. possibly something you can fix ...


2

The point of a super insulated home or a Passive house is that they rely on the body heat of the occupants plus the heat from the various gadgets in the home to keep them warm, with the insulation slowing the heat loss. A home built to Passive house standard will usually be fitted with hydronic heating (probably as the new owners are not sure that it will do ...


2

Rheem's Digital Programmable Thermostat Model# RHC-TST411MDMS. This Thermostat is Required for Enhanced Modulating Features. Check this site to determine the exact model and specs.(PDF file) http://www.expresshvac.com/res_components/gas_furnace/hvac_rheem.asp Most of these Rheem furnaces are gas fired, forced hot air.


2

Yes, that is correct. A closed-loop heat pump work by circulating a refrigerant in a loop, where there are two heat exchangers separated on one side by a compressor and on the other by a valve. Your expectation is correct: In heating mode, the inside heat exchanger does not cause condensation and therefore does not dry out the air. Having said that, there ...


2

A blower will only work if you are content with A/C only and no heat. It's probably illegal to have a house with no heat unless you live in the tropics. AFAIK, most A/C units cannot be converted to heat pumps, so it would likely be a complete system replacement. Also, with conventional heat pumps in all but the most temperate climates, you need a source of ...


2

Check the thermostat O (orange) terminal with a multimeter to ground. Most brands energize (apply 24V AC on the terminal) in cooling mode. A bunch of things could be going on such as a wire loose, bad thermostat, bad control board in heat pump or bad reversing valve but the first thing to check is the thermostat then you can work your way back to the ...


2

Your heat pump switches between heating and cooling mode through a reversing valve. It sounds like that is where your problem is; it could be that your thermostat has gone bad, or it could be something else. The outside condensing unit is blowing 68 degrees because the system is pulling heat out of the outside air, and pumping it into the house.


2

It's illogical to compare the efficiencies of gas to heat pump systems because the way they produce heat is completely different. One directly burns fuel to produce heat, the other consumes energy only to move heat around. The source heat for heat pumps is essentially free. Thus calculating heat pump efficiencies will yield numbers well over 100%, something ...


2

A heat pump thermostat prefers to operate the heat pump under "usual" conditions as that is expected to be less expensive. It will invoke the back up (or "emergency heat") when any of several conditions occur: The current indoor temperature is more than 4 °F/2 °C cooler than the temperature setpoint. This is the blockhead approach taken by ...


2

There are a couple of ways. Are you comfortable when it's really hot or cold outside? If so, then it's sufficient. Do a Manual J heat load calculation. You can do a crude approximation of this yourself using http://www.loadcalc.net/ Use "rules of thumb." These rules depend heavily on your area and become less accurate the better or worse your house's ...


2

a heat pump has a cop or coefficient of performance. Your 48000 BTU Heat pump delivers that much heating nominally with mild temperatures outside.. To see how much power it uses you divide by COP and then convert to kWh. In my area natural gas is about half the cost of baseboard heating, and heat pump heat is half the cost of gas heat. In the winter it is ...


2

Depending on your specific equipment setup, you may have a variable speed condenser fan, variable speed compressor, or both. With a variable speed compressor and condenser, the system would ideally maintain stable superheat and suction pressure (effectively controlled by the Siemens superheat controller) and would maintain a stable temperature differential ...


1

Sounds like your defrost cycle isn't kicking in. There is a defrost circuit in most newer units that controls that cycle, in which the unit runs in reverse -- literally taking heat from your house to defrost the unit. I'd turn it off ASAP if that's the case since it's just wasting electricity and call a tech to have a look and possibly replace the circuit ...


1

I moved into a new house in upper Florida, almost to the Alabama border and when I had problems with my air conditioner I called someone to come out to fix it. The maintenance guy told me I should be running 1 cup of straight bleach through my PVC pipe that goes to the air conditioner monthly.


1

Heat pumps are quite common in Central Oregon where summer daytime highs are often over 100°F and nights below 25°F. I have been in many a heat pump rental house in winter at below 10°F in a wide range of efficiencies from below eight to over 20 SEER. They work fine. For units with a SEER of over 14 or so, the backup heat does not kick in ...


1

I'm not sure if there are versions of heat pumps that have the compressor and evaporator both outside, but mine has the compressor outside and the evaporator/air handler inside, which is about the same size as the air exchanger you have in the picture. So if you install a system similar to mine, you won't have any space savings. On another note, heat pumps ...


1

You don't have to worry about a heat pump being inadequate for cooling tasks, they are available in a large range of sizes. For really large buildings, they can be ganged together. 800 sf is a walk in the park for residential sized units. I don't know the specifics of what determines when the backup furnace kicks in. IIRC, it is the combination of a lower ...



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